Абай атындағы Қазақ


ATTRACTING AND RETENTION THE BRIGHTEST AND THE BEST



Pdf көрінісі
бет276/464
Дата31.12.2021
өлшемі5.18 Mb.
#21079
1   ...   272   273   274   275   276   277   278   279   ...   464
ATTRACTING AND RETENTION THE BRIGHTEST AND THE BEST  
INDIVIDUALS IN TEACHING 
 
Nursapinova M.K. – MA Education, senior lecturer at KAZGUU, Astana 
 
Kazakhstan  is  located  in  Central  Asia  and  by  land  surface  it  is  the  ninth  largest  country  in  the  world, 
about  the  size  of  Western  Europe.  The  republic  of  Kazakhstan  has  an  upper-  middle  income  economy.  In 
2011  the  population  numbered  16.4  million  and  a  quarter  of  them  were  14  years  old  or  younger  age.  The 
population  is  well  educated  and  this  can  be  attributed  a  positive  influence  of  the  USSR.  According  to 
statistics  from  UNESCO  in  2010,  Kazakhstan  has  attained  99.6  percent  in  universal  adult  literacy,  99.0 
percent in universal primary education and 99.3 percent in gender parity. Twenty five percent of adults have 
completed higher education, thirty percent have post-secondary and forty percent have vocational education. 
The government is making considerable efforts in improving learning conditions and the capacity of schools, 
and reforming Kazakhstan’s education system to meet the needs of a modern competitive society. 
The  national  system  of  education  includes  pre-school,  primary,  secondary-basic,  vocational  or  general 
secondary, post-secondary and tertiary education. From the age of three to six children attend kindergartens, 
then usually they start school at the age of six or seven and study eleven years of compulsory education. The 
primary phase of education, grades 1 to 5, takes pupils up to age 11; secondary education up to age 17, when 
almost all students take the Unified National Test (UNT), which is counted as a test for school-leaving and 
for entry into tertiary education.  
According  to  an  OECD  review  (2014),  on  average  education  in  Kazakhstan  is  more  equitable  in 
comparison  with  other  OECD  countries.  However,  the  learning  results  in  secondary  education,  which  are 
measured  by  the  Trends  in  International  Mathematics  and  Science  Study  (TIMSS)  and  Programme  for 
International  Student  Assessment  (PISA),  are  below  the  international  average.  These  results  are  the  main 
factors  for  motivating  development  and  reforming  the  education  system  and  Kazakhstan  plans  several 
important  measures:  restructuring  the  system,  raising  the  level  of  excellence,  developing  teachers’  skills, 
expanding  pre-school  education,  introducing  new  mechanisms  of  financing,  improving  infrastructure  and 
modernising vocational education (OECD, 2014). 
Undoubtedly,  teachers  are  the  most  important  part  in  the  success  of  an  educational  system.  The  state 
Programme for Education Development of the Republic of Kazakhstan for 2011-2020 states that “education 
quality  is  determined  primarily  by  highly  qualified  teachers”.  The  international  research  of  Darling-
Hammond  (2000);  Rivkin  et  al.  (2005),  Rockoff  (2004)  and  others  suggests  that  the  most  considerable 
factors,  influencing  students’  outcome,  are  factors  concerning  the  teacher  and  teaching,  and  they  need  a 
strategic  emphasis  in  the  efforts  of  improvement  in  education.  Most  challenges  of  teacher  policy  in 
Kazakhstan are not unique and have the same tendencies as around the world. The schools of the republic are 
experiencing a shortage of teachers and this is the same situation in many other countries too (OECD, 2005; 
Schleicher, 2012).  
The  fact  that  schools  are  suffering  from  teacher  shortages  was  cited  in  the  report  of  the  Ministry  of 
Education and Science of the Republic of Kazakhstan (MESRK) when in the beginning of 2010-2011 school 
year there were vacancies for 1362 secondary teachers (OECD, 2014). As well as in the UK, according to the 
statistics  of  DCSF  (2008),  the  data  on  teacher  vacancies  indicates  a  growing  tendency  of  shortages  as  the 
number  of  unfilled  teaching  positions  rose  from  2,040  in  January  2007  to  2,510  in  January  2008.  This  is 
unfortunately getting worse, in 2010-2011, 47,700 teachers quit teaching; an increase from the 40,070 in the 
preceding year (Burns, 2012).  
Similar to the situation in Kazakhstan, teachers worldwide suffer from low status, feel undervalued, and 
are concerned about the image of their profession (OECD, 2005). The income of teachers in Kazakhstan is 
low and they are inequitably distributed among schools with highly qualified teachers working in advantaged 
schools (OECD, 2014). 
Ingersoll  (2003)  claimed  that  all  teachers  after  long  years  of  study  are  thinking  of  the  future  and  the 
enthusiasm of embarking on the process of teaching, and becoming a professional in their field. In this way 
there  is  a  lot  to  learn,  a  lot  to  do,  a  lot  to  absorb  and  a  lot  to  start  in  their  new  lives.  However,  there  are 
statistics that demonstrate that most of them would not be at school in five years. 




Достарыңызбен бөлісу:
1   ...   272   273   274   275   276   277   278   279   ...   464




©emirsaba.org 2022
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

    Басты бет