Процессы управления и устойчивость



жүктеу 30.48 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
бет26/57
Дата27.12.2016
өлшемі30.48 Mb.
1   ...   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   ...   57
 

Факультет 

прикладной математики 

прикладной математики 

прикладной математики 

прикладной математики –





–        

процессов управления

процессов управления

процессов управления

процессов управления    

призван 

увеличить знание 

математики и  

компьютерных технологий 

во всех областях 

человеческой 

деятельности! 

    


 

 

4. Технологии



программирования

 


Andriyashin* A., Miyata** K., Parkkinen* J.P.

*University of Joensuu, Finland

**National Museum of Japanese History, Finland

Spectral images archive compression

1

Introduction. Many applications seem to require spectral features.



For example in digital museums for viewing paintings under different

illumination, a spectral image of the painting and spectral characteristics

of illumination are needed. Regular RGB-color does not carry enough

information for this. Therefore, spectral image processing is becoming an

increasingly important research area. The objectives of current research

are to:


• Propose lossy compression approach.

• Introduce a new clustering technique.

• Compare convenient and new clustering.

The paper is organized as follows. First, each compression step

is proposed. Second, the implemented methods and test material are

described, and then the test results are shown. Finally, a discussion of

the results is given and conclusions are drawn.

Color spaces. We use two color spaces in this study: spectral color

space to have accurate color information of spectral images, and as a

reference, the CIE L

a



b

space, as a standard device independent color



space, commonly used in color reproduction [1]. Spectral color space

characterizes space of light reflectance. In this space, color is presented

by the reflectance spectrum of an object.

Spectral imaging has been proposed by several authors [2]. In

spectra imaging, the image I(x, y, λ) contains the complete spectral

color information of a scene. The spectral representation is independent

both on the illuminant and on the observer. Process of spectral image

acquisition is represented in figure bellow.

1

This study was supported by a research grant from the Color Research Group:



University of Joensuu

249


In this study we are interested in storing color images of paintings into

an image database to from a digital image archive for museum purposes.

This requires a compression.

Compression technique. Several color image methods for spectral

image compression have been proposed recently. Both lossy [3] and

lossless [4] compression techniques have been suggested. One of commonly

used techniques for spectra reduction is Principal Component Analysis

(PCA) applied on the spectral direction. This basic compression method

has been used as reference method in this study. PCA can express

the spectral data using a lower dimensioned subspace than the original

spectral dimension [5].

PCA transforms the spectral representation into another, presumably

smaller, spectral base while preserving as much of the information

contained in the original image as possible. As the result of reduction is

a new spectral base and matrix of multipliers for the base. The reverse

operation of the reduction can be done by multiplying the inverse of the

reduced spectrum base with the multipliers.

Measure of compression to represent ratio between sizes of the

original and compressed image is Compression Ratio (CR).

CompressionRation =

Size(I

o

(x, y, λ))



Size(I

c

(x, y, λ))



Size(I

o

(x, y, λ)) is size of the original image and Size(I



c

(x, y, λ)) is size

of the compressed image. CR is the highest with only one principal

component, but the image is grey level image, and the color information

is totally lost.

One of the ways to improve the quality of color in compression by

PCA is to introduce clustering of pixels prior to spectral compression [6].

Usually images contain areas that consist of similar colors and therefore,

one spectrum can represent the entire area instead of a group of original

spectra. To reduce this kind of redundant information in the image, pixels

can be grouped in numbered clusters. Thus, the stored compressed image

consists only of the cluster table and pixel values that are indices to the

cluster table. K-means is one of the simplest clustering methods [7]. It is

250


an iterative method, where each cluster is represented by the centroid.

To reduce the transformation error, PCA requires that the set

of transforming patterns should be found near or in a subspace. To

recognize the most suitable sets of image, the subspace clustering method

was used [8]. Method is based on the definition of a vector projection

to a subspace and clustering of each sample to the subspace, where the

projection is longest.

Subspace clustering finds clusters as elements distributed along cones

in the spectral space. Although tip of cone can only go through the

point of origin, it was hypothesized to decrease the transformation losses.

Figure below represents an example of k-means and subspace clustering

applied in the same data.

Fig. 1. Example of k-means clustering result (a) and Subspace clustering result (b)

Given samples {λ

j

}

N



j=1

in R


n

which are presumably grouped along

N

c

centers subspaces M



1

, . . . , M

N

c

). Algorithm calculates the centers



iteratively. The main criterion that vector λ

j

belong to class C



i

is

the maximum of absolute value of projection λ



ji

to the subspace M

i

comparing with projections to the other subspaces.



Dimension of PCA transformation is the minimal (is equal to one)

251


to increase compression ratio maximally. Clustering method is aimed to

find such cluster that elements of it are the most suitable to be projected

to the one dimension space (i.e. line). The absolute value of projection

λ

ji



of vector λ

j

to the line (based on vector



M



i

) is equal to scalar

product of vector λ

j

and basis vector of line divided it to absolute value



of line basis vector [9]:

λ

ji



=

λ

j





M

i



M

i



(1)

Test material and results. A goal in compression is to save color

information of painting as completely as possible. Root Mean Square

Error (RM SE) was chosen as one of the compression threshold. The

CIE L



a



b



model is a common color space, defined in 1976. It is based

on the trichromatic human perception of color. Сolor difference or ∆E

in CIE L

a



b



uniform color space was defined [10], to evaluate a color

reproduction.

The compression methods used in this study can be realized into the

following categories:

1. Compression based on K-means clustering in L

a



b



and Spectral

spaces;


2. Compression based on Subspace clustering in L

a



b



and Spectral

spaces;


The compression methods were tested with nine old orthodox icons. That

were measured by spectral imaging system [11]. The spectra were taken

on the range 380 nm -– 780 nm by 5 nm resolution. This means that

each image was represented by 81 spectral components. The values in all

components were normalized into [0, 1] and coded by 8 bits.

The error measure for the decompressed image is based on the

pixelwise reconstruction accuracy. For each method, the CR, ∆E and

RM SE were calculated.

Diagrams in Figure below represent average result over all tested

images with different parameters, spaces and methods of clustering. To

have comparable results, the compression ratio for all experiments was

set equal to about 71.

252


Fig. 2. Relationship between average over all images (a) RM SE, (b) ∆E and

number of clusters

Discussion. This paper hypothesized the most suitable technique

for an application in a historical archive system. For more quantitative

evaluation, compression technique was tested with different parameters.

As results of experiments, one can see that relationships between the

number of clustering and ∆E (RM SE) are negative at the same time

when CR is approximately the same. Also, we can see that compression

based on Subspace clustering applied in Spectral space represents the

lowest RM SE at each number of clustering. And for eight icons of ten

it represent the lowest ∆E at each number of clustering in L

a



b



.

References

1. Plataniotis K.N., Venetsanopoulos A.N. Colour Image Processing and

Applications / Ed. by Springer–Verlag, 2000.

2. Chang C.I. Hyperspectral Imaging: Techniques for Spectral Detection

and Classification / Ed. by Kluwer. New York: Academic/Plenum

Publishers, 2003.

3. Abousleman G.P., Marcellin M.W., Hunt B.R. Hyperspectral

image compression using entropy-constrained predictive trellis coded

quantization // IEEE Trans. Image Proc., 1997. V. 6, № 4. P. 566—

573.

4. Memon N.D., Sayood K., Magliveras S.S. Lossless compression of



multispectral image data // IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sensing,

1994. V. 32. P. 282—289.

253


5. Aderson T.W. An Introduction to Multivariate Statistical Analysis /

Ed. by Wiley&Sons. New-York, 1958.

6. Kaarna A., Zemcik P., Kalviainen H., Parkkinen J.P.S. Compression

of multispectral remote sensing images using clustering and spectral

reduction // IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sensing, 2000. V. 38, № 2.

P. 1073–1082.

7. Duda R.O., Hart P.E., Stork D.G. Pattern Classification. 2nd edition

/ Ed. by Wiley&Sons. New-York, 2001.

8. Parkkinen J. P. S., Oja E. On subspace clustering // Proc. 7th Int.

Conf. on Pattern Recognition. Montreal, Canada, 1984. P. 692–695.

9. Kwak J.H., Hong S. Linear Algebra / Ed. by Pohang, Korea 2002.

10. Robertson A.R. The CIE 1976 color-difference formulate // Color

Res., 1977. V. 2. P. 7–11.

11. Laamanen H., Jaaskelainen T., Hauta-Kasari M., Parkkinen J.P.,

Miyata K. Imaging spectrograph based spectral imaging system //

Proc. 2nd European conf. on color in graphics, imaging, and vision,

and sixth international symposium on multispectral color science.

Aachen, Germany, 2004. P. 427–430.

254


Jetsu T., Heikkinen V., Hauta-Kasari M., Parkkinen J.P.

University of Joensuu, Finland

Estimation of n-dimensional reflectance spectra

from RGB data using polynomial model

Abstract. In the case of digital cameras, device dependent values

describe the camera’s response to incoming spectrum of light. Transforma-

tion from one device space to another has to be defined separately

in each case. Device dependent values are not colorimetric and don’t

necessarily provide a good starting point for transformation between

device spaces. We converted the device dependent digital camera RGB

values to reflectance spectra, which is used as the device independent

color representation. We calculated the corresponding results also for

direct RGB-CIELAB conversion. We have modeled the conversion from

one color space to another as a regularized polynomial regression

problem.

1. Introduction. Digital color cameras capture the spectrum of

physical stimuli by filtering the incoming color signal through color

filters with different spectral transmittances. In the case of digital

cameras (non-colorimetric), the device dependent RGB values describe

this response to color. If we want to transform camera RGB values to

device independent space, we need to define the mapping separately for

each device. This mapping can be done for example via least-squares

regression method. Values in device independent color spaces like CIE

XYZ, CIELAB and sRGB are light source dependent, so we should

calculate separate representations for each illumination condition. If we

convert the device dependent RGB values to reflectance spectra, by using

spectra it is possible to calculate any needed color information using

arbitrary light sources.

We have modeled and tested the conversion between color spaces as

a regularized polynomial regression problem [1]. The goal of our study

was to investigate whether reflectance-estimation method can be used

for color camera calibration. We tested the model using training sets of

different sizes. We calculated the results for polynomial transformation

in explicit spectral reconstruction and in CIELAB reconstruction. This

method has been used for example in [3] and [4]. Method was evaluated

255


by using a colorimetric measure and a spectral measure with values from

two digital cameras.

2. Color Science Terms. When we want to calculate different color

coordinate representations [5] from measured spectra φ(λ), the CIE XYZ

tristimulus values are used as a starting point. Tristimulus values X, Y

and Z can be calculated using formulas (1) – (3):

X = k

λ

φ(λ)x(λ)S(λ)dλ,



(1)

Y = k


λ

φ(λ)y(λ)S(λ)dλ,

(2)

Z = k


λ

φ(λ)z(λ)S(λ)dλ,

(3)

where parameter



k =

100


λ

S(λ)y(λ)dλ

,

(4)


φ(λ) is examined spectrum and x(λ), y(λ) are z(λ) color matching

functions of CIE standard observer. Relative spectral power distribution

of light source S(λ) is also needed in calculations.

In CIELAB color space L

axis describes the lightness of color, a



is red-green axis and b

is blue-yellow axis. CIELAB coordinates can be



calculated from tristimulus values using formulas (4) – (6), where X

N

,



Y

N

and Z



N

are tristimus values of the reference white.

L



= 116 · f



Y

Y

N



− 16,

(5)


a

= 500 f



X

X

N



− f

Y

Y



N

,

(6)



b

= 200 f



Y

Y

N



− f

Z

Z



N

,

(7)



f (ω) =

(ω)


(1/3)

,

ω > 0.008856



7.787(ω) +

16

116



, ω ≤ 0.008856

,

(8)



We have used the following error measure for evaluating the CIELAB

and spectral estimation:

256


∆E =

(L



− ˜

L



)

2

+ (a



− ˜a


)

2



+ (b

− ˜b



)

2



,

(9)


where L

, a



, and b


are the original CIELAB values, and ˜

L



, ˜a



, and ˜b


are in CIELAB case the estimated CIELAB values and in spectral case

CIELAB values calculated from estimated spectra. Color difference ∆E

in CIELAB space is widely used in industrial applications for example

in quality control purposes. ∆E limit for accurate color measurements is

usually around 0.5 – 1. If ∆E value is below 3, difference between colors

in practical applications is considered quite small. ∆E values between 3

and 6 are still reasonable, and values over 6 describe usually disturbing

color difference.

3. Polynomial Model. In polynomial transformation we have

equation

XW = Y,


(10)

where the transformation matrix W maps the camera response values

(matrix X ∈ R

l×3


) to CIELAB values (matrix Y ∈ R

l×3


) or high-

dimensional spectra (matrix Y ∈ R

l×n

). Here l is the number of



samples and n denotes the number of components in the spectrum.

Unknown coefficients of this model can be obtained from least squares

approximation using pseudo-inverse approach and known RGB-CIELAB

or RGB-spectrum pairs for calculation. So the solution for the problem

10 can be calculated as

W = (X


T

X)

−1



X

T

Y.



(11)

Method solves for the training set min

W

XW − Y


F

, where


F

denotes the Frobenius norm. This linear model can be extended to

higher order polynomials by adding terms R

2

, G



2

, B


2

, RG, RB, GB, . . .

to matrix X [3], [4]. In testing phase, we used 1

st

, 2



nd

, 3


rd

and 4


th

degree


polynomials with 3, 10, 20 and 35 terms, respectively. Models with 10,

20 and 35 terms include also a constant term 1.

It is possible that for the higher order polynomials, the solution

starts oscillating and overfitting is obtained because the polynomial

adapts to the given training data too accurately but fails to generalize

257


well for test data. Effect of noise in the measured data also provides

false information for the estimated function. Regularization is a method

where we use some additional constraints for limiting the capacity of

the resulting function to overfit the data. In Tikhonov regularization

[2] we add the regularization parameter λ to normal equations. The

corresponding matrix equation is

(X

T

X + λI)W = X



T

Y,

(12)



where we can solve the matrix W . Truncated singular value decomposition

[2] (or principal eigenvector method) is another simple regularization

method for the capacity control. This means that we discard small

singular values of matrix X, when computation for matrix W is

performed

X = U SV


T

=

k



i=1

σ

i



u

i

v



T

i

=



p

i=1


σ

i

u



i

v

T



i

+

k



i=p+1

σ

i



u

i

v



T

i

=



= U

1

S



1

V

T



1

+ U


2

S

2



V

T

2



.

(13)


We can use only first p singular values for the calculation of matrix

W . Pseudoinverse X

for matrix X is calculated as X



= V


1

S

−1



1

U

T



1

.

We tested these both methods, and concluded that the Tikhonov



methods performs slightly better than the truncated SVD. Generally

the difference between these two methods was very small, so the final

results have been presented only for Tikhonov method.

4. Experiments. We tested the performance of polynomial model in

two cases: when estimating 1) CIELAB values and 2) spectra from RGB

[1]. We evaluated the color difference between original and estimated

data using CIELAB ∆E error measure. We tested how the number

of polynomial terms affects the estimation performance, and if the

regularization by Tikhonov regularization would improve the results.

For testing purposes, we had RGB data of GretagMacbeth Color-

Checker (24 samples) and Munsell Book of Color – Matte Finish

Collection (1269 samples) acquired with Fujifilm Finepix S1 Pro and

Canon A20 Powershot digital cameras under daylight simulation light

source. Spectra of both sets were sampled from 400nm to 700 nm with

5 nm step. Munsell spectra are from University of Joensuu Color Group

Spectral Database [6].

258


At first, Munsell set was divided into 3 parts: training, testing and

validation set consisting of 635, 317 and 317 samples, respectively. We

used random sets of 200, 50, and 24 samples from Munsell training set

and Macbeth set as final training sets. For each set size, we tested two

different sets picked randomly from Munsell training set. Regularization

parameter for Tikhonov regularization and degree of polynomial were

chosen so that ∆E errors for test set were minimized. Chosen model

parameters were validated using a separate validation set. Numerical

results for validation set are presented in Tables 1 and 2.

Table 1. Error values for Fujifilm camera

∆E / CIELAB est.

∆E / spectral est.

Training Set

Avg.


Std.

Max.


Avg.

Std.


Max.

Munsell 200 / I

1.95

1.06


7.84

2.56


1.92

11.07


Munsell 200 / II

1.98


1.06

6.90


2.11

1.23


7.72

Munsell 50 / I

2.20

1.26


11.60

3.37


2.47

13.18


Munsell 50 / II

2.31


1.36

10.40


4.10

3.71


20.21

Munsell 24 / I

2.73

1.48


9.99

4.29


3.70

19.60


Munsell 24 / II

2.66


1.60

11.63


3.50

3.00


18.24

Macbeth


4.99

2.80


16.85

6.49


3.26

17.80


Table 2. Error values for Canon A20 camera

∆E / CIELAB est.

∆E / spectral est.

Traning Set

Avg.

Std.


Max.

Avg.


Std.

Max.


Munsell 200 / I

3.66


2.40

13.65


3.07

2.11


12.45

Munsell 200 / II

3.16

1.94


12.18

2.87


1.83

11.87


Munsell 50 / I

5.24


3.89

23.32


4.74

3.15


22.16

Munsell 50 / II

4.52

2.78


15.77

4.74


3.57

19.91


Munsell 24 / I

6.92


4.56

23.64


5.33

4.49


27.81

Munsell 24 / II

6.65

4.44


25.36

5.24


3.56

18.49


Macbeth

6.43


3.50

19.59


6.20

3.48


20.02

5. Conclusions. The performance of color calibration via spectral

estimation depends on camera. For Canon A20 camera, the spectral

estimation gives better results than the direct CIELAB estimation. The

behavior is opposite for Fujifilm camera, which clearly shows stronger

results in direct CIELAB estimation in terms of maximal color difference.

There are large differences between the two cameras. In overall, the color

calibration results for low-cost Canon are worse than for the Fujifilm

camera.

259


Regularization is important when we use higher order polynomials

and small training sets for the transformation. On the other hand, large

regularization terms have to be used usually only in cases when the

degree of the polynomial is already too high for the training set. If the

degree of polynomial was properly chosen, the effect of regularization

was small or it wasn’t needed at all.

Size of the training set is obviously a very important factor in the

training process. Also the "quality" of the training set is an important

part of the model. As the size of the training set becomes larger, the

performance of polynomial model improves. When small training set is

used, it must be chosen carefully. It can be seen that there are quite

large deviations between results for the smaller training sets with same

size. With randomly chosen small training sets polynomial model is a

very unstable method.

References

1. Jetsu T., Heikkinen V., Parkkinen J.P., Hauta-Kasari M.,

Martinkauppi B., Lee S.D., Ok H.W., Kim C.Y. Color calibration

of digital camera using polynomial transformation // Accepted to

CGIV06 – 3rd European conference on colour in graphics, imaging,

and vision in leeds, UK, June 19 – 22, 2006.

2. Neumaier A. Solving Ill-conditioned and singular linear systems, a

tutorial on regularization // SIAM Review, 1998. V. 40. P. 636–666.

3. Stigell P., Miyata K., Hauta-Kasari M. Wiener estimation method

in estimation of spectral reflectance from RGB images // Pattern

recognition and image analysis, 2004. V. 15, № 2. P. 327–329.

4. Connah D.R., Hardeberg J.Y. Spectral recovery using polynomial

models // Proceedings of the SPIE, 2005. V. 5667. P. 65–75.

5. Wyszecki G., Stiles, W.S. Color science: concepts and methods,

quantitative data and formulae. USA, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1982.

6. University

of

Joensuu


color

group,


spectral

database.

http://spectral.joensuu.fi/

260


Krasavin K., Parkkinen J.P., Jaaskelainen T.

University of Joensuu, Finland

Digital watermarking of images

Abstract. In this study we evaluate different techniques for digital

watermarking of images. Specifically we study watermarking for RGB

images in mobile applications and watermarking for spectral images

in industrial applications. In digital watermarking for mobile devices

we consider a watermarking technique in spatial domain. We tried to

find out is there a difference in human evaluation of visual quality

of watermarked image, depending on image properties and properties

of a display. In digital watermarking for spectral images we study a

technique for embedding a watermark in frequency domain and evaluate

it’s robustness for compression attack.

1. Introduction. Copyright protection is becoming more important

as the digital imaging is dominating over the analog one. Digital

presentation allows preserving the quality of images after image processing

operations. Copying can be done easily and fast and the quality of

the copy does not differ from the original. Digital watermarking offers

a possibility to prevent illegal copying and distribution of the digital

media [1]. As a complementary part to cryptography, the watermarking

technique is protecting the data by embedding a watermark in such that

it does not disturb the image in normal image perception conditions.

The embedded watermark can be extracted for authenticating purposes.

Some of the techniques are embedding the watermark in the spatial

domain, others embed the watermark in the transform domain. Spectral

color imaging is an imaging method, where color of an object is

represented more accurately than in the traditional RGB images.

Spectral imaging is becoming a practical tool in many applications, e.g.

digital commerce, industrial quality control, and digital museum. For

spectral images the requirements set by the various applications may be

diverse.This study confesses the requirements of the reality and as such,

provides a practical approach to watermark embedding.

2. Digital watermarking for mobile devices. In this study

we consider a technique for watermarking in spatial domain presented

by Bruyndonckx [2]. The method is based on the modification of the

luminance values inside blocks. The size of the block depends on the

261


size of the watermark and the size of the original image. The choice

of the block which will contain watermark information is determined

by a secret key. The pixels of the selected blocks are classified in three

groups of homogeneous luminance. Pixels are grouped also based on their

spatial position in the block. The robustness of the embedded watermark

is defined by a required difference αbetween the mean values. For our

experiments we chose α= [5,7,10,12,15].

Test images. For our experiments we selected three different images

that represent a range of characteristics: one image is an image of human

face, the second one is a technical and artificial image, and the third one

is a high detail image (Fig.1). We chose an image "Lena"as a human

face image, map image as an artificial image, and an image "Sailor

boats"as a high detailed image. Every image is watermarked with five

different magnitudes. For experiments, we used images with sizes relative

to display resolution of a particular device. In order to have a similar

image distortion of watermarked image on different devices, we increased

the size of watermark according to dimensions of a particular image.

Fig.1. Test images: Lena, Map, Sailorboats. At the upper row are the original

images, and at the bottom row are the watermarked images with magnitude

equaling to 15

Visual assessment testing. We tested a number of watermark

magnitudes for a range of image types. For the visual assessment test we

chose three images and five magnitudes of watermark. The watermarked

262


image was shown on a mobile phone, PDA, and CRT display with

176x208, 240x320, and 1024x768 display resolutions, respectively. The

quality of watermarked image was evaluated by 20 human observers.

In an image quality assessment experiment, the subject is asked to

classify watermarked images into a number of descriptive categories. A

modified subjective mean opinion score (MOS) is used for measuring

the quality of a watermarked image.For each watermarked image, the

scores are averaged among all observers to obtain the MOS grade for

a specific image. In Fig.2,left, the MOS-scores for a specific image are

shown. The normalization of individual quality scores is done using the

z-score transform, which indicates the deviation from the mean score as

a number of standard deviations. In Fig.2,right, the z-scores for an each

image are shown.

Fig.2. MOS-scores and z-scores

263


3. Digital watermarking for spectral images. Compared to

RGB images, spectral images have higher dimension of the data.

This gives us more possibilities for watermarking purposes itself. The

watermark can be a binary image, a gray-scale image, or a spectral

image. In this study we used a gray-scale image as a watermark.

The embedding procedure follows the method described in [3]. The

watermark is embedded in the 3D wavelet transform domain. First,

a three-dimensional wavelet transform I

wt

of the spectral image is



computed. Then, a two dimensional wavelet transform W

wt

of the



watermark W is computed. The spatial size of the watermark is equal to

the spatial size of the transformed block of the image. The transformed

values of the watermark are added to the values of the transformed block

B

wt



of the spectral image, resulting to the watermarked block:

B

wt,wm



= B

wt

+ α · W



wt

.

(1)



For each pixel of the watermark a suitable band from the transformed

block is selected. The band holding the median of the respective pixels

among all the bands is selected to store the watermark pixel. In this way

we try to ensure that the watermark is not stored in a high-energy or a

low-energy component of an image. The strength of the watermarking is

controlled by a parameter α, which is calculated as a multiplication of

three parameters:

α = α


1

· α


2

· α


3

.

(2)



The multiplier α

1

depends on the frequency content of the wavelet



transformed band b and it is calculated with respect to a contrast

sensitivity function of the selected band to minimize perceptual error

in the watermarked image:

α

1



=

S

b



max

b



S

b

,



S

b

=



u,v

C(u, v)|F

b

(u, v)|


2

,

264



C(u, v) = 5.05e

−0.178(u+v)

(e

0.1(u+v)


− 1),

where C(u, v) is the contrast sensitivity matrix with frequencies u and v.

F

b

(u, v) is the discrete Fourier transform of the band b in the block.The



multiplierα

2

controls the strength of the watermark. The larger the



multiplier α

2

is, the better the watermark survives from attacks. The



value for α

3

is calculates as mean over all pixels and channels of the



original image I. Increasing of α

2

value makes embedded watermark more



robust, but at the same time the signal to noise ratio for the watermarked

image is decreasing.The spectral image is reconstructed by the inverse

3D DWT now containing the watermark.Watermark extraction is an

inverse operation to the embedding procedure.

Resistance to compression attack. The proposed embedding

procedure was applied to watermarking. In the experiments, a large

number of spectral images was watermarked and then compressed

with different bit rates. The embedded watermark was extracted from

the compressed and reconstructed watermarked images. The signal

to noise ratio was calculated between the original image and the

compressed watermarked image. For the extracted watermark, the

correlation coefficient between the original and extracted watermark was

calculated. Also the signal to noise ratio for the extracted watermark was

calculated as a measure of quality. The compression procedure described

above was applied to the watermarked images. We used 8 principal

components of the spectral image and wavelet compression with bit

rate [4 0.25 0.01562] bits per pixel, which result to compression ratios

[16, 256, 4096]. In the first experiment we wanted to find a reasonable

range for α

2

.In this experiment we used a large set of spectral images,



but the results were averaged to define only one common value of α

2

for all images.For the watermarked images, the signal to noise ratios



were calculated. In Fig.3, left, SNR of the compression is shown. SNR

was calculated between the watermarked image and the compressed

watermarked image. The α

2

coefficient increasing results in small SNR



degradation compared to compressed with the same bitrate image. In

265


Fig 3, right, SNR of watermarking is shown. For both figures, at x-

axis there is the α

2

coefficient, and y-axis there is the value of the



SNR. For the extracted watermarks, the signal to noise ratios and the

correlation coefficients were calculated. In Fig 4, left, SNR between the

original and the extracted watermark is shown, and in Fig 4, right, the

correlation coefficient between the original and the extracted watermark

is shown with respect to α

2

, averaged over all images. At the figures,



the x-axis represents the α

2

value. The y-axis represents the SNR or



correlation coefficient respectively, between the original watermark and

the extracted watermark. According to the experiment the reasonable

range for α

2

would be from 0.01 to 0.08. With smaller values the



embedding is too weak against compression and the quality of the

extracted watermark is too low for registration. The values larger than

0.08 would output an image with a visible watermark.

Fig.3. SNR of the PCA/Wavelet compressed images without watermarks(left),SNR

of compressed images with watermarks(right)

Fig.4. SNR (left) and correlation coefficient(right) of the extracted watermarks

with respect to α

2

value



266

4. Conclusions. Digital image watermarking is becoming a practical

tool in many areas. In this study we considered both mobile and

industrial applications of watermarking. In watermarking for mobile

devices we evaluated visual quality of watermarked images, displayed

on mobile devices.In watermarking for spectral image we embedded

the gray-scale watermark in a spectral image in the three-dimensional

wavelet transform domain. The properties of the watermarking on a

large set of spectral images were studied. Especially we studied the

robustness of the embedded watermark against PCA/wavelet-based

compression. For embedding parameter values we defined a range where

the embedding shows robust operation.

References

1. Ingemar J. Cox, Matthew L. Miller, Jeffrey A. Bloom. Digital

Watermarking. USA, San Diego: Academic Press, 2002.

2. Bruyndonckx O., Quisquater J.J., Macq B.M. Spatial method for

copyright labeling of digital images // Proc. of IEEE Workshop on

nonlinear signal and image, 1995. P. 456–459.

3. Kaarna A., Parkkinen J.P. Digital watermarking of spectral

images with three-dimensional wavelet transform // Proc. of the

Scandinavian conference on image analysis, SCIA 2003, Goteborg,

Sweden, June 29 – July 2, 2003. P. 320–327.

4. Krasavin K., Parkkinen J.P., Jaaskelainen T. Digital watermarking

for mobile devices. Society for information display, 2006.

267


Lehtonen J., Hauta-Kasari M., Parkkinen J.P.,

Jaaskelainen T.

University of Joensuu, Finland

Spectral image format for data communications

Abstract. Spectral images are becoming more and more common.

However, these images require a lot of memory and therefore, those can

not be transferred efficiently in ordinary network. Here, an image format

for data communications is presented.

1. Introduction. Color is usually represented on three-dimensional

color coordination For example, RGB coordination is widely used.

However, many applications need more accurate color information like

in telemedicine, e-commerce, quality control, or archiving images of

cultural heritage objects [1]. Three-dimensional color representations

have a lot of limitations. One problem is controlling color under

different illuminations. Two different colors may look the same in certain

illumination and different in other illumination [2]. This phenomenon

is called metamerism. Three-dimensional color gamut is also device

dependent, and all needed colors cannot be displayed [3]. However, these

problems can be solved by using a spectral representation [2, 4]. Here, the

light intensity in different wavelengths are measured and digitally saved.

For example, color measured from visual 380. . . 780 nm wavelength range

with 5 nm interval gives a vector of 81 light intensity values that

represents the measured color spectrum.

Spectral image is a digital image that contains a saved color spectrum

in every pixel. However, these kind of images take a lot of memory

and transferring them trough an ordinary network is time consuming.

Therefore, spectral image compression is needed, and it is coming more

and more important [5, 6, 7]. In the literature, some compression

methods use Principal Component Analysis (PCA) [8, 9] or Independent

Component Analysis (ICA) [10, 11]. From these studies, it can be seen

that 5. . . 10 basis vecors is needed for saving the color spectra with high

accuracy.

Human visual system is more sensitive to spatial resolution in

acromatic channel than in chromatic channels [12]. In JPEG compression

method, colors are represented in YCbCr color coordinate system, where

acromatic information is in Y channel and cromatic information is in Cb

268


and Cr channels. The subsampling is done only to Cb and Cr channels

[13].


In this paper, a simple compression method based on PCA and JPEG

based subsampling is shown. Because of the simplicity, this is a good

method for spectral image browsing, where the compressed images are

stored in a server and the user browses the images in the client side

[14]. The theory of this compression method is explained and some test

results of compressing two small spectral databases are shown.

2. Spectral image compression. The compression of spectral

images is a two phase method. At first, PCA is used to spectral images to

form eigenimages. Then, spatial subsampling is used to the eigenimages.

These steps can also be done vice versa, giving also faster algorithm, but

the steps are same in both ways [14]. Also ICA can be used instead of

PCA.


Let I be the spectral image with k pixels, where the pixels are ordered

to a vector. Each pixel value is a n-dimensional color spectrum. Let R

be the correlation matrix of image I

R =


k

i=1


I

i

I



T

i

,



(1)

where I


i

is ith spectrum in image I. Next, we can calculate the

eigenvectors τ of the image. From this set of eigenvectors, the m first

eigenvectors ordered by the largest eigenvalues are saved to form the basis

vectors (τ

1

, . . . , τ



m

) of the spectral image, where τ

i

is the ith eigenvector



of the ordered set. The eigenimages P are then formed with equation

P = (τ


1

, . . . , τ

m

)

T



I.

(2)


In JPEG compression, the following subsampling schemes are used

for Y CbCr images: 4:4:4, 4:2:2, 4:2:0 or 4:1:1 [13]. The marking A:B:C

defines that every row is divided to blocks of A pixels, where B pixels

are chosen from every block in odd rows and C pixels from every block

in even rows. The subsampling is done only to chromatic channels Cb

and Cr. For example 4:2:0 scheme is then same as dividing the image in

2×2 blocks and saving the upper-left corner values from every block. See

figure 1. Here, the size of blocks in different schemes are shown. The black

circles shows the pixels that are saved. Here, we use the subsampling for

eigenimages so that the first eigenimage carrying the highest amount

269

1   ...   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   ...   57


©emirsaba.org 2019
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

    Басты бет