Учебное пособие Северск 2008 (07) ббк81. 2 Англ с 593


Foreigners have souls; the English haven’t



жүктеу 2.56 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
бет8/10
Дата23.12.2016
өлшемі2.56 Mb.
түріУчебное пособие
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10

Foreigners have souls; the English haven’t.
On  the Continent if you find any amount of people  who sigh deeply 
for  no  conspicuous  reason,  yearn,  suffer  and  look  in  the  air  extremely 
sadly, this is soul.
The English have no soul; they have understatement instead.
If a continental  youth  wants  to  declare  his  love  to  a  girl,  he  kneels 
down,  tells  her that  she  is  the  sweetest,  the  most  charming  and  ravishing 
person in the  world, that she has something in  her,  something peculiar and 
individual  which only a few hundred thousand other women have  and that 
he  would  be  unable to  live  one  more  minute  without  her.  Often to  give  a 
little more emphases to the statement, he shoots himself on the spot. This is 
a normal,  week-day  declaration  o f love  in  the more  temperamental  conti­
nental  countries.  In  England the  boy  pats  his  adored  one  on the  back  and 
says  softly:  ”1  don’t  object to  you,  you  know.” He  is  quite  mad with  pas­
sion, he may add: “I rather fancy you, in fact.”
*   *   *
Fast  food  restaurants  like  McDonald’s  are  an  American  export  but 
other countries  also  have fast  food. For example,  in the Far East,  open-air 
food stalls serve hot food quickly and cheaply.
In  Britain  however,  these  open-air  food  stalls  of the  orient  became 
the Chinese takeaways, which you can find in many of the cities, towns and 
villages of Britain.
Takeaways sell hot food you carry out to eat in another place.
However, the most famous British takeaway is still the fish and chip
shop.
Wimpy is  a trademark for  a fast food  chain  in Britain.  J  Wellington 
Wimpy was a friend of cartoon character Popey who loved hamburgers.
Britain’s appetite for convenience foods is growing. Instead of meals 
many people eat crisps, snacks, nuts and cereal bars.
Less  than  half the  population  of Britain take part regularly  in  sport.
93

The  majority  of those  who  do  are  men  between  the  age  of 20  or 45.  The 
most popular outdoor sporting activity is walking (two miles or more).
The  most  popular  indoor  activity  is  snooker  ([snu:ke]  -  вид  биль­
ярдной игры) and the similar' games of billiards and pool.
This table shows the top eight indoor and outdoor sports,  games and 
physical activities that adults in Britain take part in.
Outdoor
Indoor
Walking
18,6%
Snooker/billiards/pool
8,0 %
Swimming
3,7 %
Swimming
7,2 %
Football
2.7 %
Darts
6,9 %
Golf
2,2 %
Keep fit/yoga
3,0 %
Athletics (incl. jogging)
2,0 %
Squash
2,5 %
Fishing
2,0 %
Badminton
2,2 %
Cycling
1,8 %
Table Tennis
1,4 %
Tennis
1,1  %
Bowls
1,1  %
Football  fans  sometimes  damage  trains  and  property  near  football 
grounds,  attack  supporters  of other  teams  and  fight  on  the  terraces  of the 
football stadiums.
In Britain they are known as ‘football hooligans’.
In Europe,  football hooliganism is known as the English disease,  al­
though there are hooligans in other countries too.
In Britain, a twenty-first birthday party traditionally marks  ‘the com­
ing of age’. Today, this tradition is less important because young people get 
so  many  rights before they  are twenty-one.  For example,  in Britain young 
people  have  the  right to  vote  at  the  age  of eighteen.  Now,  the  eighteenth 
birthday is becoming as important as the twenty-first.
There are six and a half million dogs and six to eight million cats in 
Britain.  This  means  that  approximately  one  in ten  people  own  a  dog  or  a 
cat.  Every year the British spend  over  1,5  billion pounds  on pet food such 
as  tinned  dog  food.  They  also  support  over  380  charities  and  societies 
which  aim  to  protect  animals.  These  include  donkey  sanctuaries,  horses’ 
rest  homes,  and  dog  and  cat  sanctuaries.  The  RSPCA (The  Royal  Society 
for the Prevention  of Cruelty to Animals)  is the  largest animal  welfare  so­
ciety  in  Britain.  It  provides  practical  help  to  animals  in  homes,  hospitals 
and clinics.  However,  it also campaigns against animal  cruelty.  It has over 
250  inspectors  who make  sure  nobody breaks  the  laws  which  protect  ani­
mals.
In Britain,  marriage is a relationship where a man  and woman make 
a legal agreement to live together.
The  agreement  can  be  religious  (such  as  in  church)  or  in  a  civil 
ceremony. Today only 50 % of people get married in church. Young people
94

under  sixteen  can’t  get  married.  When  you  are  sixteen  or  seventeen  your 
parents must agree.  The number of teenage wedding is dropping. Only 28% 
of brides and  11% of bridegrooms are under 21. 32% of brides and 33% of 
grooms are aged 21-24.
The average age for men to get married  is 25,5.  The average age for 
women is 23.
One  in  ten  British  couples  get  divorced  in  the  first  six  years.  The 
younger the couple, the more likely the divorce.
In a church the bride and the groom take the marriage vow  :
“I  James take thee Carol to  be my  lawful  wedded  wife,  to have and 
to hold from this  day forward,  for better or worse, for richer for poorer,  in 
sickness  and  in health, to  love and to  cherish, till  death do us part,  accord­
ing to God’s holy ordinance;  and thereto I plight thee my troth.” The vicar 
blesses the wedding ring and places it on the third finger of the bride’s left 
hand.  These  days,  the  groom  often  wears  a  ring  too.  As  they  leave  the 
church together,  their friends throw confetti and rice.  The friends and fam­
ily  go to  a reception  where  there  is  a lot  of food  and  drink.  They  drink  a 
toast to  the bride  and groom,  eat a slice  of wedding  cake  and  listen to the 
speeches.
16. Food and Drink
English  cooking  is  heavy,  substantial  and  plain.  The  ideal  English 
breakfast consists  of cereals,  either porridge  (borrowed  from the  Scots)  or 
com  flakes  with  milk  and  sugar  followed  by  bacon  and  eggs,  or  sausages 
and tomatoes, toast and marmalade, and finally, of course, a cup of tea.
Tea  is  part  o f the  prose  o f British  life,  as  necessary  as  potatoes  or 
bread.  It must be made  "just like mother makes  it",  one teaspoonful  of tea 
for each person and  "one for the pot".  Boiling water is added and the tea is 
allowed to stand, brew or draw. It is drunk with or without sugar but almost 
always with milk. No self-respecting Briton would drink a cup of tea which 
has not been  made in a teapot in a civilised way; he would certainly never 
accept a cup with that monstrosity, a tea bag, dangling in it.
The  midday  meal  is  called  lunch.  This  meal  consists  on  week-days 
for example, o f stew, fried fish, chops,  liver, or sausages,  and some kind of 
vegetable, usually carrots, cabbage, cauliflower or peas, and potatoes. Meat 
is rather expensive in Britain and the working class tend to buy the cheaper 
cut  and  imported  rather  than  homeproduced  meat.  Rice  and  macaroni  are 
seldom served. Vegetables such as carrots, peas and cabbage are cooked for 
long  periods  in  lots  of water,  then  strained  and  served.  They  are  not  sea­
soned  with  sweet-sour  sauces  or  with herbs.  The  sweet,  sometimes  called 
dessert,  may  consist  of fruit  and  custard  or the  famous  steamed  or  boiled 
pudding.  Another favourite  sweet is rice pudding or sago.  There are many 
varieties o f pie.  Fruit baked  in  a covering of pastry  with  a "lid"  is called  a
95

pie;  without a lid it is called a tart. These pies or tarts are eaten hot or cold, 
often with custard.
Sunday dinner is a special occasion, a week-end joint of beef or lamb 
being  bought and  eaten  hot  with  vegetables.  After this  there  will  probably 
follow  a  large,  heavy  pudding  with  custard;  a  cup  of tea  completes  the 
meal. The English occasionally like to drink water or beer with their meal, 
but only in the expensive restaurants or among upper class people are spir­
its taken  with  the  meal.  Spirits  are  generally too  expensive for the  normal 
household,  except  at  Christinas  time.  Supper  is  usually  a  snack  of bread 
and cheese and cocoa. The English have a popular speciality known as fish 
and chips. This meal,  fit for king,  is only appreciated by those with  a spe­
cially trained palate. Fish and chips can be made at home but the best fish 
and  chips  are  sold  in  fish  and  chips  shops.  Fish  coated  in  batter  are  fried 
golden-brown  and  served  with  chips  on  a piece o f paper,  salt and  vinegar 
are added and the meal is then wrapped in a final  sheet of newspaper.  One 
hurries home with the precious bundle,  its delicious odour wafting through 
the newspaper,  or else the fish and chips  are simply eaten out of the news­
paper, in the street, with one's fingers. This is one of the joys of being Eng­
lish!
17. Invitation to Dinner
The  two  features  of life  in  England  that  possibly  give  visitors  their 
worst  impressions  are  the  English  weather  and  English  cooking.  The  for­
mer is  something that nobody can do  anything about but cooking is some­
thing that  can  be  learned.  English  food has  often  been  described  as taste­
less. Although this criticism has been more than justified in the past, and in 
many instances still is,  the situation is changing somewhat. One of the rea­
son  that  English  cooking  is  improving  is  that  so  many  people  have  been 
spending  their  holidays  abroad  and  have  learned  to  appreciate  unfamiliar 
dishes. However there are still many British people who are so unadventur­
ous when they visit other countries that they will condemn everywhere that 
does not provide them with tea and either fish and chips or sausage,  baked 
beans and chips or overdone steak and chips.
One  o f the  traditional  grouses  about  English  food  is  the  way  that 
vegetables  are cooked.  Firstly the  only  way that many  British housewives 
know to cook green vegetables is to boil them for far too  long in too much 
salt water and then to throw the water away so that all the vitamins are lost. 
To  make  matters  worse,  they  do  not  strain  the  vegetables  sufficiently  so 
that they appear as a soggy wet mass on the plate.
It  would  be  unfair  to  say  that  all  English  food  is  bad.  Many  tradi­
tional British dishes are as good as anything you can get anywhere. Nearly 
everybody knows about roast beef and Yorkshire pudding but this is by no 
means the  only  dish that is  cooked  well.  A visitor if invited to  an English
96

home might well  enjoy  steak and kidney  pudding or pie,  saddle of mutton 
with  red-currant jelly,  all  sorts  of smoked  fish,  especially  kippers,  boiled 
salt beef and carrots, to mention but a few.
A strange thing about England that the visitor may notice is that most 
of the  good  restaurants  in  England  are  run  and  staffed by  foreigners  -  for 
example there is a larger number of Chinese,  Indian and Italian restaurants 
and to a less extent French and Spanish ones.
Scottish Food
Have you ever heard about a Scottish breakfast?
The  first  thing you  have  for  breakfast  in  Scotland  is  porridge.  It  is 
made  from  oatmeal,  and  the  Scots put  milk  and  salt on  it.  Then you  have 
eggs (or fish,  or sausages),  with bread or toast;  and then toast and marma­
lade.  With your breakfast you drink tea.
When people from other countries eat a Scottish breakfast, they don't 
want to  eat  anything else  for the rest of the  day.  But the  Scots are hungry 
again by lunch-time.
One of the most famous Scottish dishes is haggis.  It is made of meat 
and  oatmeal.  It  is  large  and  round,  but  looks  like a  pudding.  You  usually 
buy haggis at a butcher's. You can also buy haggis in tins.
18. Gardening
"Если бы Вам вздумалось вскрыть сердце англи­
чанина,  Вы  обнаружили  бы  в  самом  сердце  его 
клочок подстриженной лужайки". Н. Казантаакис
Perhaps the  commonest  of all  hobbies  in Britain  is  gardening.  Most 
English people love gardens and have many times been described as "a na­
tion of flower-growers".  This may be one of the reasons why people prefer 
to  live  in houses  rather than  flats.  Nearly all  houses  have  a small  piece  of 
garden  at the  front  of the  house  and  a  small  enclosed  garden  at the  back. 
The  garden  usually  consists  o f a  small  well-kept  lawn,  a  garden  path  and 
some  flower  beds  or  flower  border.  There  might  be  a  "kitchen  garden", 
where vegetables and herbs are grown, hidden away not to spoil the attrac­
tiveness  of the  rest.  People  who  have  no  garden  of their  own  sometimes 
have  patches  of land,  often  in  specially  reserved  places,  known  as  "allot­
ments", where they grow vegetables.
You can hear gardening being discussed on trains and buses and over 
the  garden  fences,  as  well  as  at  the  innumerable  flower  and  vegetable 
shows  of the  spring  and  the  summer,  from  the  famous  Chelsea  Flower 
Show,  to  the  small  local  affairs  which  cause  such  deadly  rivalry  among 
gardeners. Prizes are awarded for the best exhibits. Frequently it is the gar­
dener's aim to grow the biggest carrots or cabbages, but this does not mean 
that the quality and taste  will necessarily be the best.  Gardening clubs and 
evening classes attract a large number of enthusiasts.
97

One of the newer forms of entertainment is Bingo, a game of chance, 
played by groups of people for money-prizes. It is organized throughout the 
country  in  converted  cinemas,  club  rooms  and  village  halls,  providing di­
version  for  the  elderly  and  lonely,  and  does  not  involve  large  sums  of 
money.
19. Special Days
MOTHER'S DAY
Mother’s day is celebrated on the second Sunday in May in England. 
On Mother's Day people visit their mothers if possible and give them flow­
ers and small presents.  If they cannot go, they send a "Mother's Day card". 
The  family  try  to  see  that  the  mother has  a  little  work  to  do  as  possible. 
Sometimes  the  husband  or  children  prepare  breakfast.  They  help  with the 
other meals  and  do the  washing  up.  They try to  make Mother's  Day  a day 
of rest for their mothers. On Mother's Day children say "thank you" to their 
mothers for taking care of them during the whole year.  They give a card to 
their mother, and a little present - some flowers or a box of sweets.
ST. VALENTINE’S DAY (February 14)
"I'll be your sweetheart, if you will be mine,
All of my life I'll be your Valentine..."
On  this  day  greetings  of affection,  sometimes  of a  comic  character 
are  sent  in  the  form  of Valentine's  cards  to  a  person  of the  opposite  sex, 
usually anonymously. The first Valentine was said to be a Christian martyr, 
who before he  was put to death by the Romans sent a note of friendship to 
his jailer’s  blind  daughter.  The  Christian  Church  took  for  his  saint's  day 
February  14, the date of the old pagan spring festival,  when young Roman 
maidens threw decorated love missives into an um to be drawn by their boy 
friends.
HALLOWEEN
Halloween  was  first  celebrated  many  centuries  ago  in  Ireland  and 
Scotland  by Celtic priests called Druids.  They observed  the end o f autumn 
and  the  beginning  of winter.  The  Druids  thought  that  Halloween  was  the 
night when the witches  came  out.  As they  were  afraid  of the  witches they 
put  on  different  clothes  and  painted  their  faces  to  deceive  the  evil  spirits. 
They  also  placed  food;  small  gifts  near  the  door  of their  houses  for  the 
witches.  This  was,  as they say now, the beginning o f the  expression  "trick 
or treat" (meaning "give me something or I'll play a trick on you").
BONFIRE NIGHT (GUY FAWKES' DAY)
Remember, remember 
For I see no reason
The Fifth of November Gunpowder, 
Why gunpowder treason 
Treason and plot, 
Should ever be forgot.
98

These  are  the  words  of a  song  children  sing  on  November  5.  The 
Gunpowder Plot (1605)  was conceived by Robert Catesby,  who  organized 
a Roman Catholic attempt to blow up the Houses of Parliament, during the 
ceremonial state opening o f Parliament by James I.  Guy Fawkes, an experi­
enced soldier stored the barrels  of gunpowder in a vault under the Houses 
of Parliament.  The  plot  was discovered  in  time  and the  conspirators  were 
arrested and  executed.  Right up to the present time the  Gunpowder Plot is 
commemorated  in  Britain  on  the  fifth  o f November  and  marked  by  fire­
works displays and bonfires on which the "guy" is burned.
20. Christmas
What  does  it  mean  to  you?  Cards  and  presents,  good  things  to  eat, 
trimmings  and  decorations,  carols  and  nativity  plays,  crackers  and  panto­
mimes?
The  word  Christmas  means  Christ's  Mass.  The  Mass  is  an  ancient 
Christian  church  service  at  which  people  give  praise  and  glory  to  God. 
Christians believe that Jesus Christ was born in a stable in Bethlehem about 
two thousand years ago and was the Son of God.
The story o f Jesus' birth explains many of the things we see and do at 
Christmas  time.  It  explains  why  we  sing  carols  about  Jesus,  and  why  we 
sometimes  put  a  star  on  top  of the  Christmas  tree,  like  the  star  the  three 
Wise  Men  followed.  It  explains  why  we  put  on  nativity  plays,  why  we 
make Christmas cribs and why we give presents, just as the Wise Men gave 
gifts to Jesus.
All  over the  world,  traditional  gift  bringers  visit  children  at  Christ­
mas.  Santa  Claus  is  the  best  known  o f these.  His  name  comes  from  the 
Dutch  for  'St.  Nicholas',  which  is  Sinterklaas.  St.  Nicolas  was  Bishop  of 
Myra,  in Asia Minor.  He was a rich man who used his wealth to help oth­
ers.  Although  his  feast  day  is  on  6th  December he  was  so  famous  for  his 
generosity that his name is always linked with Christmas itself.
On Christmas Eve the final preparations are made for Christmas Day 
(December 25).  Some families may have  a young fir tree.  This  is  "Christ­
mas tree", its branches draped with tinsel and hung with shining ornaments, 
and perhaps coloured lights. Paper chains hang across the rooms and paper- 
balls  bob  up  and  down  from  the  ceiling.  Sprigs  of holly  and  ivy  decorate 
the rooms and a large bunch of mistletoe hangs in a prominent place in the 
hall,  or over the  door.  It is  a custom to kiss under the mistletoe.  Christmas 
cards  are  displayed  on  the  mantelpiece,  i.e.  the  shelf over  the  fireplace. 
They bring good wishes to the family -
A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year
or
The Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for the New Year.
Carol-singers  come  round after dark,  and are invited  in for some re­
99

freshment.  They  usually  collect  a  few  coins  from  each  house,  either  for 
themselves or some charity.
On  Christmas  Eve  tired  but  reluctant  the  children  go  to  bed  early, 
looking forward to the morning.  Young children  hang  up  a large  stocking 
or a pillow-case at the foot o f the bed, hoping to find it filled with presents 
when they awake.
Christmas dinner on December 25  is a great occasion. There is roast 
turkey  with  chestnut  stuffing  and  roast  potatoes  and  Christmas  pudding. 
Plum  pudding  is  sure  o f honour  on  the  Christmas  dinner  table.  We  could 
dispense  with  turkey  and  goose,  we  could  even  dispense  with  mince-pies, 
but a Christmas dinner in Britain without the traditional Christmas pudding 
would be strange indeed.
Nowadays,  in  addition  to  the  basic  mixture  of flour,  breadcrumbs, 
suet  and  eggs,  the  ingredients  of Christmas  pudding  include  raisins,  cur­
rants,  sultanas,  candied peel,  chopped  almonds and  walnuts,  carrot and (in 
place of the discarded mutton  broth) a good measure of brandy,  whisky or 
old ale. In many households the mixing of the pudding is quite a ceremony, 
with all the members of the family taking turns to  stir and make a wish.  A 
wooden  spoon  is  normally  used  -  in  accordance  with  the  old  custom  by 
which our ancestors honoured the memoiy o f the wooden manger at Beth­
lehem  -  and the  mixture  is  still  stirred  from  east to  west to  commemorate 
the visit of the Wise Men. After being boiled for several hours, the pudding 
is  stored until  the time  comes  for heating  it on Christmas  Day,  when  it  is 
brought  to  the  table  adorned  with  sprigs  of holly  and  glowing  from  the 
flames of lighted brandy.
There is a legend about how Christmas puddings were invented.

One Christmas Eve, a king of England found himself in a forest with 
no food. Night was drawing on, so he stopped at a woodcutter's cottage and 
asked  for food  and shelter.  The woodcutter was very poor,  but he  and the 
king mixed together all the food they had. The king had only some brandy. 
The  result  was  a  sweet,  sticky  mixture  which  they  put  into  a  bag  and 
boiled. Lo and behold! They had made the first Christmas pudding.
A traditional  kissing  bush  is  easy  to  make  -  simply  cover  a  frame­
work o f hoops with evergreens and hang a sprig o f mistletoe йот  the cen­
tre. Any girl who is kissed beneath the bush will be sure of good luck and a 
happy marriage.
Some  nations  celebrate  the New Year,  but  for the  English the  most 
important festival is Christmas.
Telling your fortune in the pudding.
Some cooks put silver coins and lucky charms into the pudding mix­
ture.  But  many  years  ago,  other  simple  things  were  added  and  it  became 
part of the  fun  to  see  who  got what!  A  dried  bean  in  your  portion  meant 
that you were going to be a king.
100

A dried pea meant that you were going to be a queen, A clove meant 
that you would grow up to be a rascal.  A twig meant that you would grow 
up to play the  fool.  A bit of rag in your pudding meant that you were  lazy 
and would rather buy a Christmas pudding than go to the trouble of making 
one!
In parts of Northern England and in Scotland the old custom of First- 
Footing  is  still  observed.  Tradition  says  that  the  first  person  to  enter  a 
house on New Year's  Day  should be a dark-haired  man,  otherwise  ill-luck 
will follow.  It is also advisable that the person should bring with him a gift
- a piece of coal, a fish, a bottle of whisky or a piece o f bread are traditional 
gifts. Curiously enough, in a few other parts of the country, the First-Footer 
is  required  to  beat  fair-haired  man.  In  the  past,  a  young  man  of the  right 
colouring  and  with  an  eye  to  business  would  offer  his  service  as  First- 
Footer to house holds in the district - for a small fee.
Making spirits bright.
What fun it is to ride and to sing 
A sleighing song to night.
Каталог: library
library -> Қазақ тіліндегі ономастикалық топтастырудың салыстырмалы-аналитикалық сипаты
library -> Тілі орыс бөлімдері студенттеріне арналған
library -> И. Р. Гросс СҰлтанмахмұт торайғыров шығармашылығының тілі
library -> Қазақстан республикасы білім және ғылым министрлігі
library -> Магистратура «Журналистика және қазақ филологиясы» кафедрасы магистрлік диссертация сын есім шырай категориясы теориясының қалыптасуы
library -> Гуианигарлық серия серия I'уманитирпых паүк 31 (574. 25) Семей облысы, павлодар уезіне
library -> Батыс қазақстан облысы ұлы отан соғысы жылдарында
library -> М.Өтемісов атындағы БҚму ғалымдарының ғылыми еңбектерінің сериясы / Тарих


Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10


©emirsaba.org 2019
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

    Басты бет