Іі халы аралы ылыми-тůжірибелік конференциясы а



жүктеу 24.47 Mb.

бет19/129
Дата15.03.2017
өлшемі24.47 Mb.
1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   129

ů

 

1.  М


а

  а


а

а  


а

  // 


а а

а   Р


а

 

а



 

 

 



 

а

 



  а

 

а



  а

а

а а



.  «На а

а

  З



 

»  ДББ , 

К

 

, 48-50, 53- .



2. К

 Д. Ч


  а

 

 



? http://testolog.narod.ru/Other15.html (05.11.2012)

3. Б


а Б. . С

 

а  



а  

 

  а а



а 

а

 



а

 // 


Б

  а а


а  

. №2 (44). 2012., 13- . 



83

АКМЕОЛОГИЧЕСКИЙ ПОДХОД К ОРГАНИЗАЦИИ ИССЛЕДОВАТЕЛЬСКОЙ  

ДЕЯТЕЛЬНОСТИ УЧАЩИХСЯ 

А

а И.В.

КГУ «О

а

а  

а-

а  «Да

» 

 

 

а

 

» 

   У

а

 

а

а

 а

а а Жа

 

а

Р

а Ка а

а

А

а а

Ма а а а  а

  а

  а

 

а

 

 

 

а

 

а  

а а  

а .    А а

 

 

 

  а а

    - 

а

 

 

ǩ

  а

 

ǩ

 

а



  - 

 

 

ǩ

 

а

 

ǩ

.  А   а

 

а а

а а а  

ǩ

 ǩ

 

  а а а

 ǩ

 

 

  а

а

.

А

а

С а

  а

а

 

а

 

   

а

 

 

а

 

 

а

 а

.  К

 

 

  а

  

 

 

а

    

  

 

   

а

.  О

  а

 

а 

 

а   а

а   

а  

а

.  М

 

 

  а

 

а   а

 

а

   

 

.

Аbstract

  The  article  reveals  an  innovative  approach  to  student’s  research  work  through  acmeological  aspect.  The 

ultimate goal of the work is the desire of students to high and successful outcome. A feature of this experiment is the 

group work and good results. Methodology is based on the work are the author’s programs and teaching centers.

Л

 



   

 

 



 

 

а



 

 

а



а, 

 

 



 

а

 



 

 

а  



а

.  Б


 

 

а



 

а

 



 

 

а



а

 

а



 

.  П


 

а 

 



а

   


 

 

а  



 

 

.  О



 

 

 



а

а

 



 

а

а



 

 

а



а

   Ка а


а

 

 



а 

а

 



 - 

 



  а

 

 



а   

а

 



а

,  а





В  а

 Н.А. На а

а а «С

а

а  



а

 Ка а


а а:  а

а   а


   

 

 



а», 

 

а , 



 

 

-



а

 

    а а



а

 

  а



 

  а


 

  а


  а 

а

 



а . П  

 

а ,    а



 

а

 « а



 

 

 



а

  «


» 

 



,  а

а

   



а

 

» [1]. «Г а



а  

а 

 



 - 

а

 



а

 



а  

   


 

а

а



  а  


а   а 

 

   



а

 

 



», - 

 



О

 

 



  

 

а



,  Н. А. На а

а

 



 

 

   



  а

 

 



а

  

  



 

 



    а

  а


 

 «О


 

а



   

а

 



а».  А

 

    а



 

 

 



 

 

   



 

 

 



 

 



 

   


 

а

 



 

а

 



 

 

 [2]. 



П

 

а



 

  а


   

 

    а



 

а

а



 

а   а





а

   


 

а

 



.  В 

 

а



 

 

а 



  а

а  


   

 

а



 

а



   

а

,   



 

а а  


 [3]. Э а 

   


   

 

 



  а

 

 



а

а

 



а

 

 



а

.

С



а 

а

 



а

:


84

1. П


 (

 

а



).

2. О


 (

а

а 



а

а



а  а а )

3. За


а

 (

а



а   а

а).


На 

 

а



 

   


 

 

   



   

 

 



 

а

   



а

 

 



 Х. Га

а. А а


 

  а


  

а а , 


 

 

а



 42,97% 

а а


 

 

 



а

, 26,62%  - 

а

-

а



, 15,96 % - 

а

, 12,17% - 



- а

а

, 2,28% - 



О

 



 а

а

  а 



 

а

 



 

а

 –   8 



а

,   


 

 



   

а

 



  а

а

 



   

 

.



Да

 

а



 

 

   а 



 – 

  а


а

1. Ж



а

 (

а



 

   


а  

а

а);



2. И

а

 ( а



-

а

а  



);

3. К


 (

а

   



а

а

 



 

а



 

  а



 

 



а

 



а

 (

 



   


);

4. Т а


а

 (

  а



);

5. М


а

 (

 а



а

 

   



 

а

);



6. К

 (

а 



  а  а а

   


 

а );


7.  О

  ( а


а    а

а



а

   


 

    а


а а


а 

).

Ка



а   а

а

 



а  

 

а



,  а

 

 



а

 

 



 

а   а



   

а

а  



 

  (


  а

а  а  


   

 

 



 

).  И


а

 

а а  



а

 

а



-

а



 

 

а



 а а

а

 



.

Д

 



 

 

а



 

 

 



  а


а  

а

 



а

 

 



а

.  П


а

 

 



а

 

   



 

а

 



   

   


 

а а  а


  а  

.  Ма


а

 

а  



 

 

а



-

а

 



   И

. П


  а а

 

а



,  а



  а

 



  а

 

а



 

  а  Microsoft Offi ce, PowerPoint, 

Microsoft Offi ce Publisher, Microsoft Movie Maker, Microsoft Offi ce FrontPage. Д

 

а



 

а

 



а

 

  Photoshop, Macromedia Flash, CorelDraw, Deep Zoom-



 

Microsoft research auto collage  2008.



Б а

а

 



а

 

 



  а

 

а,  а  



а 

а



  

а

 



  а

а

   



 

а



а

 

а



 

а

а



 

 

 



а

а

а



 

  а


,  а  

  

 



   

а



 

 

 



.  К

 

 



  а

 

 



а

а

 



а

 

 



а

 

  а



а 

а

  а 



   

 

а .



  На 

 

а



 

а

 



 

а

а 



а

 

   



а

а  а а  


а

 

. Ка  



а

,  


а а

а

  а



   


,  а



а

 

а



,  а

  а 


 

  а



а

 



 

а

а    а



а 

а

 



а

.



Б

 

а



  а

 

 



 

 

. В 



 

а

 



а , а

а

 



   

 

а



.  У  а

 

 



 

 

.  Р



а 

а

  а



 

а

 



 

 

.    О



  а

а

,  а



а

а



а

а

,  а



а

   


 

 

 



а

 

. В  а



 

 

а



а   а

а

. П



 

 

а  а



 

а

 



а

 

а



.  У

а

  а



а 

 

а     Р



  а

а  Жа


 

а

. О а 



а а 

 

 



а

. На 


 

а

а 



а Жа

 

а



В  


  а

 

а



  а

а   а


. Ка

 

 



 

а

   



а

 



85

В 

 



  а

  а


 

 

  а а



 

а

  а а



а. Д

   


 

70% 



а

 

а а 



а

    а   а 

    

 

. П



 

а

а



 

 

а  



а

  а


а    

а , 



а

   


 

а  Жа


 

а

.  Г



 

 

 



  а

,   


а  

  а


 

а.  В


 

а

  а а



 

а

 



а  

а

.  Т



  а

 

а 



 

а

а



    а а

  а


-

а

 



.  Д

 

 



 

а

  а а



 

 

а



 

,  а 


а   – 

а

 



. В 

 

 



а 

а

  а



а

 

  а



   

а

 



.

В

   



а

 

 



 

. Н     а

 

а 

 



 

 

а



О

  а



а

    а


  а а

 

   



а

 

 



 

а. В ,  


 

 

:



• 

а

а а



 

;

• 



 

  а


 

 

  а



а

  (


 

   


а ),  а  а 

 

 



 

а

 



а  а

 

 



 

 

;



• 

 

 



 

а

 



: «В

а  


 

а

 



!»;

• 

 



а  а

а

а;



• 

 

а   



 

;

В



 

 

 



 

а

 



а

 

 



 

 

  а



а

 

а  



 Жа

 

а



. Э

  а  


,  а    

. О


 

 

 



а  

а

 



:

1. 


С

а

  а



  а

а.

2. 



О

 

 



  а

   


 

 



3. 

О

 



 а

  а


  а 

а

 



.

4. 


И

  а


  а 

 

а



 

 

   «



а

» 

а



.

П  


 

,  а


 

а

 



,   

 

,   



а

 

а



В 

 



а

 

а



 

 

 



а

.  Е


,  а  Д

 



 

а 

а



   

 

а



.  Ка

 

а  



а

 

 



а

:  10 


.  О

 

а



 

а

 



   

а а


 

а

   



а  

  а


.  П

 

 



а

 

 



 

а

а



 

 

а



а , 


а , 

а

а , 



а

а , 


 

а



а     .  .  П

 

 



  а а

 



а

  а


.  В 

 

 



   

 

.



У а

   


  а

а

  а  



а

 

 



  а

     


 

. С


а  

  а , 


  а   а

а

  а М



а

 

 «З



а   а

а». 


Д

 

 



,  а


 

а



   

 

а



 

 

  а



а 

 

а а



 

. С


а

 

а



 

а а 


 

 а

а



,   

 

а



 

а

а



 

Б



  а

 

 



    а

а

 



а

 

 



.  На а 

а 

 



а

  М


а

 

 



а 

 

  «ШПИРЭ».    Р



а 

 а

а



-

а

  а



 

 

а а



 

а



 

 

 



  а

Н



 

а

 



а

  а 


 

а 

а



, а 

а   а


 

а

    а



а

 

  а



-

а

 



. В 

 

 



 

а



,  

 

 



 20  а


-

а

 



. В

 

 



 

:

1. 



Б

 

 



а

 

 Та а



 А а а  ( а 

 Жа


 

а

). А



: М

а а а Р., А

 А.

2. 


М

 

а а 



 

а а


   

 Ша


 К

 А а а  ( а 

 

Жа

 



а

). А


: М

а

 М.



3. 

В

 



а

  а


а

а

    Б



а

 

  а а



.  А

С



а а

 А.


4. 

В

а



 

 

 



   

  С а


  К

  А а а .  А

И

 А.



86

Г

а



а  

а

 



а

а

  Жа



 

-

 



   

 

 



а

. А


: А а

а А.


На  а

а

 



а

 

а



а  

 

 



 

а

 



а

а

 



 

    Р


а

  Э


  Ц

    Ц


а

  А


,  Та ГПИ, 

М

  Ц



  В

,  ОО «Э


О

а »   НПО «О

а

» ( . Ка а а



а).

П  


а  2011-2012 

 

а 92% 



а

 

а



  

а

а



 Learning Content Devolopment 

System,    EaasyQuizzy,    Deep  Zoom-

  Microsoft  research  autocollage,  31% 



а

 

а



а

 

а



 

а  


 

   


, 65%  а

  а


а    

а

а



 

 «З


  а

» РЭЦЦА, 14% 

а

а

   



а

 а

а



   

  а 


 

а , 


 25% 

 

   



а

 

 



 

а

 



- а

 «Э


».

Н.А. На а

а

   


 

 П

а



 

а а    


  

а



а

 

  а а  



 

 

 



а

   



 

 

а    



 

а

  а а



а

.  П


 

 

 



  а

 

 



а

 

   



 

а

а  



а

 

а



 

 



 

а  а


 

   


-

 



 

а

  II    III 



  а    Р

а

 



а .  За 

 

 



 

а

 



 

 

а



:

• 



 

а

 



а

 

 



 (Ч

,  . П а а);

• 



      3 



а

а 

а



 

  а


 

  (США,  Г

а



Р



);

• 



 

а

 



а    

а

  а



 

 

 



   

;

• 



25 

 

а



 

а    


а

  а


 

 

 



   

.

К



 

 



   а

а

 



 200  а

   


  а 

а

   



 

а . В 


 

 

 



 

 

а



 

а

а



  М

а

 



а 

а

а



 

а

 



а

а

 



а PEC (Ч

)   


   а

 

а Р



 Ф

а

 



«И

  - 


»,  а

а а


  М

а

 



а 

 

  «Б



», 

а

 



М

а

   



а 

 

 



  «ШПИРЭ»  (Н

)    М


а

 

а  «З



а  

а

а», 



а

 

    Р



а

   


   

 

-



 

 

,  



а

 

а



а

 М

а



 

а

  а



 

 

 



    . У

 

О



 К

а Н


а

,  


а

 Р

а



  

а 

-



а РК 

К. Ма


а  «Та а 

а  а


а  – а а  

а а а


а ».

В  а


а  

а

 



 

а «ШПИРЭ» 

 

а

 



а

 

 «М



 

а  


а»   

а

  а 



 216 

 



В 

 

-



а а 

  а


а

 а

 



 

 

а



а

 

 



   

  а


 

  



 

   


  20 

а

   4  а



 

а

. Б а



а

 

  а



   

  а


а

 



 

  100%  а

 

а

  



 

а  ЕНТ. В  

 

а

   ВУЗа   а 



 

а

 



а

а

 



а

, а 


 

 

а



 На а

а

 У



а.

И

а

а  

а

а

1. На а


а

 Н.А. С


а

а  


а

 Ка а


а а: 

а

а   а



   

 

 



а.

- http://www.kazpravda.kz/c/1341882404 (5.10.2012)

2. П

. В.В. А


  а  

 

  а



а 

а

а



.

- http://festival.1september.ru/articles/532318/

3. П

 А. Н. М


 

 

    а



 

а

 



-http://researcher.ru/issledovaniya/psihologiya_issl_deyat/a_3jpfi 2.htm(15.09.2012)

87

TO INCREASE PUPILS’ INTEREST TO THE SUBJECT THROUGH

DIALOGIC TEACHING 

Alimbekova H.P.

secondary school-gymnasium with a preschool mini centre, 

Kapchagai, Almaty region

Kazakhstan

А

а

а

 Е



  а

а   а

 

  а

 

 

,  а   а

  ǩ

 

 

а а   а

. С

а  

а 

 

 

 

а

 

ǩ

 

а

  а

 

а а  

а

 

ǩ



а а

а , 

а а

  ǩ

 

 

а  

а  а а

а  

 

а 

  ǩ

. О

 

а

 

 

ǩ

 

а

 

а   а

  а

а 

  а

. О

а

  ǩ

  а

а 

ǩ

 

  ǩ

 

  а а

 

а

 

  а

 

.  З

 

а

 

 

а

 

 

а  

а

а 

ǩ

 

 

 

 

а  

 

ǩ

 



А

а

На а 

а а 

а

  а

а

   

 

 

   

 

.  В 

 



а

  а а

 

 

 

а

 

а

,  а

а



 

а    а

 

 

. О

 

  а

  а  а

 

 

 

.  О

 

 



а

 



 

 

а

а.  О

а  

а

а 

а а а, 

 

 

 

а

 

  

  а

 



 

  а



Abstract

Our country is one of the highly developed countries and it needs the stable future. The most important thing 

is to use the process of education that let pupils be independent, self-motivated, engaged, responsible and critical 

refl ective learners. Teaching must include a way of thinking and set of core beliefs on the part of the teacher, and 

knowledge of a set of alternative actions that relate to these beliefs. One of the proved useful teaching methods is 

to teach pupils through the dialogic teaching. Research evidence suggests dialogue occupies a critical position in 

the classroom in relation to children and learning.

Our country is developing now that’s why it needs the stable future to take a high position among the highly-

developed countries of the world. The most important thing is to use the process of education that let pupils be 

independent, self-motivated, engaged, responsible and critical refl ective learners who are able to communicate in 

Russian, Kazakh and English. Today teaching must develop deep understanding of the subject on the part of the 

pupil so that they can use and apply knowledge beyond the classroom. To reach high results teachers must improve 

their teaching methodology based on the experiences of successful teachers throughout the world. Teaching must 

include a way of thinking and set of core beliefs on the part of the teacher, and knowledge of a set of alternative 

actions that relate to these beliefs. 

In my pedagogic way now I pay great attention to my teaching and try to use all the methods that give good 

results. One of the the proved useful teaching methods is to teach pupils through the dialogic teaching. As the 

Kazakh say that the language stands above all art I also approve that we can develop pupil’s knowledge through 

the language.       

Research evidence suggests dialogue occupies a critical position in the classroom in relation to children and 

learning. Merser and Littleton (2007) have shown that classroom dialogue can contribute to children’s intellectual 

development and their educational attainment. The interaction with adults can provide opportunities for children’s 

learning  and  for  their  cognitive  development.  Vygotsky  describes  the  young  child  as  an  apprentice  for  whom 

cognitive development occurs within social interactions; in other words, when children are guided into increasingly 

mature of thinking by communicating with capable others and through interactions with their surrounding culture 


88

and environment. Vygotsky further argued that cognitive ZDP defi nes skills and abilities that the child is in the 

process of developing; a range of tasks that the child cannot yet perform independently. To perform such tasks 

children need the help of adults to support them as they learn new things. Such scaffolding involves communication 

and Vygotsky considered language to be the main vehicle for learning. [1] 

Vygotsky’s model of learning suggests that knowledge is constructed as a result of a pupil’s engagement in 

dialogue  with  others.  The  teacher’s  role  in  facilitating  social  engagement  in  the  learning  process  is  therefore 

crucial for developing pupil learning. Pupils are more likely to learn where there are opportunities dialogue with 

more  knowledgeable  others.  Teachers  can  offer  such  opportunities.  Learning  will  take  place  where  ideas  are 

discussed by the pupil himself. Barnes (1971) established that the way in which language is used in classrooms 

as  major  impact  on  pupils’  learning.  Barnes  demonstrated  that  pupils  have  the  potential  to  learn  not  only  by 

listening passively to the teacher, but by verbalizing, by talking, by discussing and arguing. More recent research 

by Merser and Hodgkinson (2008) built on the earlier work of Barnes to establish the centrality of dialogue in the 

learning process. There is now considerable evidence that suggests that getting student to talk together in class has 

numerous benefi ts in: 

• 

allowing students to articulate their understanding of a topic;



• 

helping them to understand that other people may have different ideas;

• 

enabling students to reason through their ideas;



• 

assisting the teacher in their understanding of ‘where their students are’ in their learning.

A characteristic of much classroom talk is the extent of the teacher’s conversational control over the topic, the 

relevance or correctness of what pupils say and when and how much pupils may speak. Pupils in many classrooms 

have  few  conversational  rights.  For  example  pupils  cannot  say  their  opinions  about  their  teacher’s  thoughts. 

According  to  the  research  when  the  teacher  controls  the  discussion,  as  we  used,  does  not  give  good  results  in 

developing pupils’ speech. 

Alexander (2008, p.48) argues that “talk in learning is not a one-way linear communication but a reciprocal 

process in which ideas are bounced back and forth and on that basis take children’s learning forward.” In dialogue 

children and their teachers are equal partners who try to reach an agreement. Interthinking can be achieved through 

dialogue with pupils, however pupils can do it with each other in a process of joint enquiry. [2]

 Merser’s research asserts that talk is a vital apart of students’ learning and that there are three broad types of 

talk that people engage in: Disputational talk, in which: There is a lot of disagreement and everyone makes their 

own decisions. There are few attempts to pool resources. There are often a lot of interactions of the ‘Yes it is! – 

No it isn’t! type. The atmosphere is competitive rather than cooperative. Cumulative talk, in which: Everyone 

simply accepts and agrees with what other people say. Talk is used to share knowledge, but the participants in the 

discussion are uncritical of the contributions of others. Ideas are repeated and elaborated but are not necessarily 

carefully  evaluated.  Exploratory  talk,  which  in:  Everyone  offers  relevant  information.  Everyone’s  ideas  are 

treated  worthwhile,  but  they  are  critically  evaluated.  Pupils  ask  each  other  questions.  Pupils  ask  for,  and  give, 

a  reason  for  what  is  said  –  so,  reasoning  is  ‘visible’  in  the  talk.  Members  of  the  group  try  to  reach  agreement 

(though of course they may not – it’s trying to fi nd agreement that’s important). Most discussions are usually a 

mixture of these types of talk. Merser asserts that the most productive discussions, in terms of building collective 

understanding and learning, tend to be those where there are high levels of exploratory talk. [3]

  Research  has  established  the  relationship  between  speaking  and  listening  and  children’s  learning.  Barnes 

(1976)  and  Merser  (2000)  argue  that  exploratory  talk  is  the  kind  of  talk  that  teachers  should  aim  to  develop. 

When children engage in exploratory talk, they are almost certain to be working in small groups with their peers. 

They  will  be  sharing  a  problem  and  each  other’s  ideas,  building  up  shared  knowledge  and  understanding.  In 

other words, children are thinking together. When children engage in exploratory talk we can hear them thinking 

aloud: hypothesizing and speculating. Children might use words and phrases such as ‘perhaps’, ‘if’, ‘might’ and 

‘probably’; they reasons to support their ideas, ‘because’ and seek support from the group by asking questions such 

as ‘wouldn’t it?’ [4]

In such kind of working children are listening to each other and considering their response. However, here the 

teacher is a guide. 


89

A frequent pattern of questioning observed within classroom has been found to take the form of Initiation – 

Response – Follow up (IRF). For example: 

Initiation (teacher): How many bones are there in the human body? 

Response (pupil): Two hundred and six.

Follow up (teacher): Excellent.   

This model is typifi es many classrooms where it is the teacher who is the initiator and who controls the talk 

(Merser, 1995). Such classrooms do not offer opportunities for the type of dialogic talk which promotes learning.

Questioning is the critical skill in the sense that, done successfully, it becomes a powerful fool for teaching 

by supporting, enhancing, and extending children’s learning. It is generally argued that there are essentially two 

types of questions that teachers can use to elicit children’s understanding. There are: lower-order and higher-order 

questions. To lower-order questions one can answer ‘right’ or ‘wrong’. Higher-order questions let pupils apply, 

recognize, extend, evaluate and analyze information in some way. Both types of question have their place within 

an effective pedagogy. In addition, questions need to be formulated to match children’s learning needs. There are 

different questioning techniques: 

Prompting: prompting may be necessary to elicit an initial answer to support a child in correcting his or her 

response, for example simplifying the framing of the question, taking them back to known material, giving hints 

or clues, accepting what is right and prompting for a more complete answer.

Probing: probing questions are designed to help children to give fuller answers, to clarify their thinking, to 

take their thinking further, to direct problem-solving activities, for example, “Could you give us an example?”



Redirecting: redirecting questions to other children, for example, “Can anyone else help?”

Considering the role of questioning as a dialogic approach to support learning suggests that, through questioning 

a teacher can: 

• 

Encourage pupils to talk constructively and on task;



• 

Signal a genuine interest in the ideas and feelings of children;

• 

Develop curiosity and encourage research;



• 

Help children to externalize and verbalize knowledge; 

• 

Help children’s creative thinking;



• 

Help children to think critically;

• 

Help children to learn from each other and to respect and evaluate each other’s contributions;



• 

Deepen and focus thinking and action through talk and refl ection;

• 

Diagnose specifi c diffi culties or misunderstanding that could inhibit learning.   



Just as important as the teachers’ questions is the questioning that arises from careful listening to children’s 

responses. In dialogic talk the questions asked by children are as important as the questions asked by the teacher 

and the answers given. The teacher is not using questions for the purpose of testing pupils’ knowledge, but also 

to enable them to refl ect, develop and extend their thinking. Wragg and Brown (2001) suggest several types of 

response that can be made to pupil’s answers and comments. Teachers can: 

• 

Ignore the response, moving on to another pupil, topic or question 



• 

Acknowledge the response, building it into subsequent discussion

• 

Repeat the response verbatim to reinforce the point or to bring it to the attention of those that might not 



have heard it 

• 

Repeat part of the response, to emphasize a particular element of it 



• 

Paraphrase  the  response  for  clarity  and  emphasis,  and  so  that  it  can  be  built  into  the  ongoing  and 

subsequent discussion

• 

Praise the response (either directly or by implication in extending and building on it for the subsequent 





1   ...   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   ...   129


©emirsaba.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал