Сборник материалов



жүктеу 2.8 Kb.

бет14/20
Дата15.03.2017
өлшемі2.8 Kb.
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   20

Литература 
 
1.  Цветков  М.А.,  Цветкова  И.Ю.  Дистанционные  образователь-
ные  технологии:  опыт  и  перспективы  применения  в  вузе. 
cvetkov@nki.nnov.ru

2.  Джусубалиева  Д.М.  Дистанционные  образовательные  техно-
логии, как условие качества подготовки специалистов // Материалы III 
международной  научно-практической  конференции  «Интеллектуаль-

 
160 
ная нация: наука, образование и инновации», 13 апреля г.Астана 2012г. 
2 том стр.6-9;  
3.  Джусубалиева  Д.М.  Роль  сетевых  сообществ  в  повышении 
квалификации  и  переподготовке  педагогических  кадров  //  Вестник 
КазУМОиМЯ,  серия  педагогические  науки  №3  (25),  Алматы,  2010г., 
стр. 5-11. Изд. КазУМОиМЯ, 2010 – 160с.;   
4.  Андреев А.Л. Россия в глобальном образовательном простран-
стве // Высшее образование в России. – №12. – 2009. – С. 9-20; 
5.  Тихомирова  Н.В.  Законодательное  и  нормативно-правовое 
обеспечение индустрии электронного  обучения для интенсивного раз-
вития экономики России // Экономика и образование сегодня. – №19. – 
2010; 
6.  Джусубалиева  Д.М.  //Эффективное  использование  дистанци-
онных  образовательных  технологий  в  учебном  процессе:  проблемы  и 
перспективы.  Материалы  VIII  научно  –  практической  конференции 
«Efektivni modernich ved-2012», Прага Publishing House «Education and 
Science» 2012 cnh/cnh/ 7-11; 
7.  Джусубалиева Д.М. // Дидактические средства дистанционно-
го  обучения.  Материалы  научного  семинара,  посвященного  «Дню  ра-
ботников  науки  Республики  Казахстан»,  Алматы,  2012  год,  -236с., 
стр.21-32; 
8.  Джусубалиева  Д.М.  //  Применение  дистанционных  образова-
тельных технологий в вузе: проблемы и перспективы. Вестник Казах-
ской финансово - экономической академии, 2 (15) 2012г. стр.95-99 
 
 
KNOWLEDGE, MANAGEMENT, AND KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT 
 
Diana Ismailova 
Kokshe academy, Kazakhstan,  e-mail: idt12@mail.ru 
Tomasz Woloviec 
Institute for Financial Research and Analyses, University of Information 
Technology and Management in Rzeszow, Faculty of Economy, e-mail:  
wolowiectomek@gmail.com 
 
         Annotation 
Managing  local  government  units in the  21
st
  century  faces  new  chal-
lenged connected to the conditions of knowledge-based economy. Currently 
the  greatest approval  is gained  by  the  view  which  states  that the  ability  to 
manage  knowledge  becomes  a  truly  deciding  factor  for  the  efficiency  of 
economic processes. In the conditions of globalisation, free capital flow and 

 
161 
dynamic development of the capital market and new financial instruments, 
the LGUs are forced to seek new paradigms for finance management, such 
as  will  focus  –  to  a  greatest  extent than  before  –  on  diffusing information 
and knowledge, developing competences of key significance for the LGUs, 
developing  financial  knowledge  among  LGU  employees  and  supporting 
organisational learning.  
Keywords: Local Government Units, LGUs management, intellectual 
capital, financial instruments, local finance. 
Introduction 
Local  governments  constantly  evolve  and  undergo  dynamic  changes. 
This  stems  from the  fact that their structure, rights,  organisational  form and 
methods of acting are always the effect of changing macroeconomic and so-
cioeconomic conditions, economic and technical possibilities and many other 
factors  impacting  social  behaviour  and  needs.  Managing  local  government 
units in the 21
st
 century faces new challenged connected to the conditions of 
knowledge-based economy. Currently the greatest approval is gained by the 
view which states that the ability to manage knowledge becomes a truly de-
ciding  factor  for  the  efficiency  of  economic  processes.  In  the  conditions  of 
globalisation, free capital flow and dynamic development of the capital mar-
ket  and  new  financial  instruments,  the  LGUs  are  forced  to  seek  new  para-
digms for finance management, such as will focus – to a greatest extent than 
before – on diffusing information and knowledge, developing competences of 
key significance for the LGUs, developing financial knowledge among LGU 
employees and supporting organisational learning.  
Knowledge  resources  management  and  intellectual  capital  creation 
should be viewed as complementary, mutually dependent and interpermeat-
ing processes. Intellectual capital is the consequence of suitable application 
of financial knowledge in practice
1
. On the basis of the above arguments, it 
is possible to identify the premises connected with the role of knowledge in 
modern LGU management. They include the following determinants:  
  knowledge is an LGU’s strategic resource, as it is the basis for cre-
ating innovative processes e.g. in the area of finance management; 
  knowledge is created by people and their competences; 
                                                             
1
 See more in: Buckman R. H., Building a knowledge driven organization, McGraw-
Hill Companies Inc., New York 2004, and in: Bush P., Tacit Knowledge in Organ-
izational  Learning,  IGI  Global,  London  2008, and  Craig  L.,  Moore  L.,  Intellectual 
Capital in  Enterprise  Success:  Strategy  Revisited,  John  Wiley  &  Sons  Inc.,  Hobo-
ken, New Jersey 2008.
 

 
162 
  knowledge is a resource used in every part of an LGU’s function-
ing  and  at  its  every  level  (knowledge  is  the  basis  for  configuring  key  in-
vestment processes and for developing key competitive competences); 
  usually there is not just one kind or category of knowledge; much 
more frequently synergically integrated groups of various types  of  knowl-
edge are created; 
  the  quality,  relevance  and  value  of  the  created  knowledge  is  veri-
fied  by  the  local  environment,  the  community,  and  the  new  added  value 
created by investment for the inhabitants. 
1.  Intellectual capital as an LGU resource 
Currently  the  subject’s  literature  takes  the  stand  that  the  essence  of 
knowledge management is the practical application of all resources an LGU 
has  (both  financial and  organisational) to  realise  its  strategic  and  develop-
ment goals. However, it must be kept in mind that the processes of locating 
and developing knowledge are just a part of the local government’s success. 
To talk about permanent benefits resulting from LGU knowledge manage-
ment, the new knowledge must be used in practice. Considering the above, 
E. Skrzypek claims that knowledge resources in an organisation are its intel-
lectual  assets,  a  sum  of  the  knowledge  of  individual  employees  and  their 
teams.  The  resources  change  continually  and  form  the  process  of  LGU 
learning. An interesting view on the issue is presented by G. Urbanek, who 
states that intellectual capital constitutes an organisation’s invisible resource 
which creates visible effects. Intellectual capital is both knowledge in itself 
and  the  result  of  its  transformation  into  intangible  assets.  It  can  thus  be 
stated that the key problem is the LGUs’ ability to gain, generate, accumu-
late  and  effectively  use  the  current  and  extensive  knowledge,  foremostly 
with  the  participation  of  LGU  executive  and  decision-making  bodies  and 
LGU  workers.  In  such  a  view,  the  human  capital  becomes  a  factor  which 
contributes directly to building the potential of intellectual capital and is at 
the same time its valuable basic element
2

It  may  be  said  that  from  the  viewpoint  of  the  specific  character  of 
knowledge management in the LGUs the most crucial matter is to recognise 
the  basic  factors  responsible  for  creating  the  particular  components  of  the 
                                                             
2
  See  more  in:  Skrzypek  E.,  Wiedza  jako  czynnik  sukcesu  w  nowej  gospodarce 
(Knowledge as Success Factor in New Economy), [in:] E. Skrzypek, A. Sokół (eds.), 
Zarządzanie kapitałem ludzkim w gospodarce opartej na wiedzy (HR management in 
Knowledge-Based Economy), Knowledge and Innovation Institute, Warszawa 2009, 
and  in  Urbanek  G.,  Pomiar  kapitału  intelektualnego  i  aktywów  niematerialnych 
przedsiębiorstwa  (Measuring  an  Enterprise’s  Intellectual  Capital  and  Intangible 
Assets), Łódź University Press, Łódź 2007.
 

 
163 
intellectual  capital,  and  to  diagnose  the  relations  between  them.  Such  ap-
proach stems from the fact that the LGUs are not uniform, both with regard 
to  the  administrative  level  and  to  financial  autonomy  or  the  scope  of  own 
tasks.  Thus  it must  be  noticed  that  in  practice  there  appear  various  factors 
impacting  the  development  of  the  selected  elements  of  intellectual  capital. 
They are directly dependent on such conditions as: the LGUs’ geographical 
location,  their  own  income  structure,  financial  autonomy  or  their  tangible 
and intangible assets. An equally important role belongs here to the entre-
preneurship of inhabitants and management innovativeness, and finally also 
the quality of public services, which derives from the inhabitants’ expecta-
tions and their activity.  
When making research on local governments, it must be noted that the 
dynamic increase of the LGUs’ investment expenditure and ever more inten-
sive search for alternative sources of financing investments and further devel-
opment perspectives make knowledge – understood as intellectual capital – to 
the  priority  of  local  government  targets  and  a  marker  of  LGU  competitive-
ness.  The  above  findings  bring  us  closer  to  structuralising  the  concept  of 
knowledge management and recognising the  conditions  for the  processes  of 
creating  intellectual  capital  in  the  LGUs.  Research  conducted  in  2003-2004 
by B. Kożuch
3
 showed that local government employees appreciate active and 
passive forms of training in knowledge and vocational skills development. In 
nearly half  of the  examined  units a training  policy  was  functioning, and the 
training  system  took  into  account:  training  planning,  training  needs  assess-
ment, training implementation and training process effectiveness assessment. 
The opinions on the actual situation proved the need for far-reaching changes 
in human resources management in public organisations. None of the exam-
ined organisations claimed to have a training system consistent with the train-
ing policy aims or principles. In the examined units there was no comprehen-
sive, fully realised training policy, either
4
.  
2.  Knowledge and effective use of LGU financial potential 
Considering on the one hand the presented significance of knowledge 
in  the  process  of  effective  management  and  use  of  LGU  potential,  the 
change  evolution  directions  in the  whole  public  finance  sector,  the role  of 
                                                             
3
  Kożuch  B.,  Zarządzanie  organizacjami  publicznymi  w  warunkach  transformacji 
systemowej  (Managing  Public  Organisations  in  System  Transformation),  research 
project  of  the  State  Committee  for  Scientific  Research-Ministry  of  Scientific  Re-
search and Information Technology 2003-2004 nr 2H02D 05924.
 
4
 Kożuch B., Zarządzanie publiczne w teorii i praktyce polskich organizacji (Public 
Management in the Theory and Practice of Polish Organisations), Placet, Warszawa 
2004, pp. 146-147.
 

 
164 
the  capital  market  and  various  financial  instruments  in  LGU  management 
process,  and  on  the  other  the  traditional  view  on  the  LGUs  as  a  kind  of 
“public tasks administrators”, and adding to that the level of knowledge  of 
graduates  and  young  employees  of  the  LGUs’  financial  departments,  the 
following conclusions may be drawn: 
Firstly: The changes occurring in the whole public finance sector, the 
effect of the adopted strategy of reducing the public debt and budget deficit, 
will cause the assumed debt to grow – in relation to the LGUs (and their asso-
ciations), while the pace in which it grows will diminish, in consequence of 
the decreasing deficit of this group of units. The LGUs’ loan needs will stem 
from  investment  expenditure,  mostly  for  infrastructure  projects,  including 
those co-financed with means from EU funds. Similarly to the previous years, 
the most debt will be generated by cities with district rights and communes. 
According to the forecast of the Ministry of Finance, the dominating instru-
ment  in  financing  the  LGUs’  loan  needs  will  still  be  credits  obtained  from 
commercial banks in the Polish market. Also the debt from communal bonds 
will grow, particularly those issued by large local government units. The rule 
of the LGUs’ balanced current budget, in force since the beginning of 2011, 
will  influence  the  scale  of  new  liabilities  that  are  incurred.  The  LGUs  may 
incur  liabilities  until  2013  on  the  principles  defined  in  the  act  of  30th  June 
2005 on public finance. The rules of incurring liabilities defined in the act of 
27th August 2009 on public finance, aimed to counteract the LGUs incurring 
excessive debt, enter into force in 2014.  
Secondly: In a real view, considering e.g. inflation, the real income of 
local  government  units  seems  to  be  stable,  and  in  some  cases  even  to  de-
crease. There are several causes of that: income structure unfavourable for 
local  government  units, too  low  means  –  in relation to  needs  –  granted  to 
local government units from the state budget, high bank credit rate. Another 
factor which is unfavourable for the state of public finance is the shifting of 
ever  more  tasks  and  obligations  to  the  local  government  level  without  a 
suitable income increase.  
Thirdly:  The  presented  restrictions  on  the  freedom  of  local  govern-
ment units to incur liabilities, in connection with the need to treat the LGUs 
as active market entities and at the same time as participants of the capital 
market  are  confirmed  by  new  issues  of  communal  bonds,  performed  even 
by  medium-sized  and  small  communes.  By  the  end  of  the  3rd  quarter  of 
2010, 418 Polish local governments had issued bonds. Many of them issued 
the  bonds  several  times,  which  gives  a  true  view  to  the  size  of  the  bonds 
market  in  Poland.  In  the  1st  quarter  of  2011,  the  value  of  the  communal 
bonds  market  reached  the  level  of  11.47  milliard  PLN.  In  a  year-to-year 

 
165 
view, the value of this segment grew by 61.9%. During the last quarter, its 
value has risen by another 5.7%.  
Financial  knowledge  is  an  important  factor  of  LGU  functioning  and 
development  in  the  conditions  of  world  economy  globalization,  necessary 
reforms  and  suggested  changes  in  the  functioning  of  the  whole  public 
finance sector. It is also the ability to manage financial processes at a local 
government  unit  level  in  the  conditions  of  limited  freedom  of  debt  man-
agement  and reaching  for  investment means  from  European  funds.  Consi-
dering the progressing reforms of the public finance system in Poland and 
the resulting legal consequences for LGU financial management, and on the 
other  hand  taking  into  account  the  development  of  the  financial  services’ 
market addressed to local governments, the quality  of employees and their 
knowledge  in  modern  and  dynamic  local  finance  management  gain  a new 
dimension. The LGUs seek knowledge, specialist training, and often togeth-
er  with  universities  realise  various  projects  –  financed  with  EU  means  – 
concerning  training,  consultancy  and  implementation.  The LGUs  have  the 
financial means for education and training, as proved both by the provisions 
of budget resolutions and by reports from realising the budgets. On the oth-
er hand,  financial  education  based  on  a  modern  understanding  of  financial 
management must be stimulated, with consideration for the new challenges 
in economy and finance after the subprime crisis, as well as for the theoreti-
cal requirements and practical concepts of New Public Management. 
Conclusion 
A crucial instrument of building financial knowledge in the LGUs is a 
dedicated offer of  comprehensive tools which allow to create overall LGU 
financial strategies based of the determinants of their construction, financial 
strategies’  creation  procedure,  as  well  as  financial  decision  models  which 
will  form  the  basis  for  strategic  solutions.  An  integral  element  of  educa-
tional  and  consultancy  programmes  is  the need  to  present  the  whole  deci-
sion-making  process  within  the  adopted  income  and  expenditure  account 
related  to  both  short-  and long-term  task  performance.  Local  governments 
should have  the  areas  where  general  strategy  elements  are  connected  with 
the  financial  strategy  indicated  to  them,  together  with  the  significance  of 
those connections for LGU budget management.  
An important area of implementing financial knowledge in the LGUs is 
also offering insurance tools as a method to manage risk in local government 
activity, including financial risk. Implementing this product should cover is-
sues related  to  the  possibilities  of  limiting risk  in  local  government activity 
using insurance methods. In effect, training packages should include a review 
of the classification of types of insurance useful and applied in local govern-
ment units’  activity,  considering the  aspects  in  which insurance  companies’ 

 
166 
offers should be analysed. Finally, the offer of each insurance product should 
hold an assessment of insurance conditions, ways to compare them and crite-
ria allowing to optimise the choice of the insurance offer.  
An area of knowledge which is commonly seen by the LGUs as con-
troversial and dubious is ordering the performance of the LGUs’ own tasks 
to communal limited liability companies and joint-stock companies, without 
applying the public procurement law
5
. The problem here are the issues of a 
possible  recapitalisation  of  such  companies  as  a  form  of  payment  for  the 
performed public tasks, i.e. raising the share capital through additional con-
tributions.  The  LGUs  expect  precise  solutions  standardising  the  issues  of 
potential  problems  with  such  subsidisation  of  the  companies’  activity, 
which in the case of raising the share capital may result from the guarantee 
function  of  the  share  capital  expressed  in  the rule  that  company  liabilities 
should not be paid from the amount equal to the capital amount. Moreover, 
raising  the  capital  and  potential  subsidies  should  be  viewed  from  the  per-
spective of their admissibility according to provisions on public aid
6
. Impor-
tant is also the issue whether in the case of the communal company “intrin-
sically”  performing the  commune’s  tasks,  a  sale takes  place  as  understood 
by the act on value added tax
7
, which should be considered for instance due 
to  the  fact  that  the right  to  deduct  that tax, included  in  the  goods  and  ser-
vices purchased by the company, is problematic in such a situation. 
An area of both consulting and training equally desired in LGU activ-
ity is knowledge  on the possibilities to use sale-and-lease-back of  commu-
nal property in practice. This form of leasing provides an interesting alterna-
tive for such financing forms as for instance credits. This is the only instru-
ment in the  market  characterised  by  a  division  of  investment risk  between 
the lessor and the customer, because for example such a loan does not need 
to  be  settled  as  a  whole,  as  in  the  case  of  a  credit.  The  local  government 
may pay e.g. 70% of the liabilities to the bank, and the rest is treated as the 
lessor’s risk. It seems that this should be an interesting product for all com-
munes which do not wish to raise their debt ratios. However, the use of this 
option  by  local  governments in  Poland  is  very  difficult  and risky,  as  there 
are no suitable legal acts to sufficiently standardise these instruments. The 
act on property management
8
 is very unclear in this matter. Inconsistent is 
                                                             
5
 Act of 29
th
 January 2004, Public Procurement Law, Dz.U. 2010, No. 113, item 759.
 
6
 Act of 30
th
 April 2004 on proceeding in cases concerning public aid,
 
Dz.U. 2010, 
No. 18, item 99
.
 
7
 Act of 11
th
 March 2004 on value added tax, Dz.U. 2011, No. 177, item 1054.
 
8
 Act of 21
st
 August 1997 on property management, Dz.U. 2010, No. 102, item 651. 
 

 
167 
also  the  judicature  of  the  Regional  Chambers  of  Accounts.  In  effect,  local 
governments have to be very careful when using sale-and-lease-back. 
In the situation when the environment constantly changes, there is no 
stabilisation  and  uncertainty  grows,  the  LGUs  expect  solutions  based  on 
changing from current to predictive approach, and a development of effec-
tive  rapid  reaction  methods  to  create  their  development  and  perform  own 
tasks  in  a  stable  manner.  The  LGUs  require  knowledge  on  strategic  plan-
ning  and  financial  strategy  creation  and  modelling.  The  finance  manage-
ment strategy in local government units is determined by a system of basic, 
medium-  and long-term  principles, rules  and instruments  used  to  gain and 
expend  money  to  meet  the  needs  of  the  local  or regional  community.  The 
LGUs  want  solutions  which  would  enable  them  to  implement  comprehen-
sive  financial  strategies  (aggressive,  balanced  or  conservative,  as  needed). 
Financing the activity of local government units may be subject to  various 
strategies. The strategies may at the same time be modified in order to in-
crease  finance  management  effectiveness  in  local  government  units  and 
properly meet the needs of the local community. 
A knowledge area connected with LGU financial strategies is the issue 
of shaping the tax policy at the local (communal only) level, considering the 
usefulness and effectiveness of applying reductions and exemptions in local 
fees and taxes. Quite frequently, communes give in to the political pressure 
of the local community and introduce various tax preferences which have a 
very limited impact on economic and social phenomena. Communes expect 
comprehensive  research  on  the  non-fiscal  effectiveness  of  the  preference 
system in local taxes and on a competent construction of medium- and long-
term tax strategies (correlated with the financial strategy).  

1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   20


©emirsaba.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал