Іі халы аралы ылыми-тůжірибелік конференциясы а



жүктеу 24.47 Mb.

бет111/129
Дата15.03.2017
өлшемі24.47 Mb.
1   ...   107   108   109   110   111   112   113   114   ...   129

 

7-

а 20- а



а 

 

 О.Г



 

 ǩ

 



  а

а  а


а

  а


а

 У.С.П



 «С

  а


а » 

а

а



 

а Б


а  

а

 



  ǩ

 

а



.  Е   а

 

а



а

  а а


 

 

а



а

а 



 

а

 



 

?  Б


 

а

а  



 

 

 



а

а, 


 

 

  а а 



 

, а


а

а а  


  

а

а а, 



а а  а

  а


  а

а

.  О



а   1-4  а а  

а

а  



 

 

а



:

С  


  ǩ

 

 



а

 

 



а

?

С



  а

а   ǩ


  а ?

Н  


?

Т

 а



а  

 

 



.

  а  


 

а ...


а а

 

  а



 



а а   ǩ

,а а  


а

а 

а



а ...

Д

 а



.

а

  ǩ



 

.

(6-7 а а )



О

а 

 



 

а  ǩ


 

 

 



  ǩ

 

. К



 

  а  


 

 



а  а

а  ǩ


 

 



 ǩ

 



 

 



 – 

а

 



 

а

  ǩ



.Мǩ

  

 



 

  

 а



,  а

  а 


 

а

.



С  

  ǩ


 

 

а



 

 

а



?

С

  а



а   ǩ

  а ?


Н  

?

Е



 а

а

 



.

 

.



 а а

а  ǩ


 

 ǩ

.



Ба

 а

 а



а 

 



 

 

.



Д

 а

а



а

.

С



  а

а 

а



.

Д

  а



а а  

.

Д



 

 

,  а



а  

а а


.

Мǩ

  а



а 

а



  а  а

а

а 



.

Д

 



 

 

.



Е  

  а


а  

 

 



 

 

 Д



 

.4  а а  а

а

  

а



.

С

  а



а

 

 



.

С

 Б



а  

 

а



 

 



 

а

а



.

А

а  



 

 

а



а

  а


а,

  а . Б


а   а

 

 



а

 

?



а

 

 



 

 а

а



а а  

  а


а

.

 



 

 

.



  а

а .


 

.

Жа



  а

а

 



 

.

Б



а   а

 

  а



а  

 

.



 

 

 



 

 

ǩ, 



 

 

а а



!-

 Д

 



.

а

  а



  а

 

 



а

а  


  а


а  

 

 



 

-

а



  а

а -


  а

 

а



  а

а   а


а .

Э

  -ǩ



 

а

 а а



 

  а


а

а

, а



 а

а



а

 

 



  -  Д

  а


а 

 

а   Б



а   а

  а а


  а

.  О


а  

О.Г


  

 ǩ



 

а

 «С



  а

а » а


 

а

а  а



а  ǩ

 А а


 

«А а   а а

 а а   а а

а 



а ,  а

» 

  а



  а

а а


а   а


 

а

а



.

А а


а

 

а



  а

- а


а  

 а а


 

 

, а а



 

 

 



 

а а  а


 

а



 

-



   

.

  а



-

а , 


а  ǩ

 а а


 

а

а



  а  а

а 

а  



а

 а

.



Ма

а

 



а  ǩ

  а


а  

  а


  ǩ

  ǩ


  а   а

  а


 

а

 



 

а а  


а

а а


 

- а


  ǩ   а - а

  а


а а

. Б


 

ǩ

 а



а

 – 


 

 



  ǩ

 

  а



а

 

а  ǩ



 

а

а а



а,  

а  


а 

 

 



 

  а


а

  а


а

:

• 



а   ǩ

  ǩ


 

- а


а 

а

 



  а

,  а - а


  а

а  


ǩ

 ǩ



 

 

 



а

а

а  а



а

  ǩ


 

;


493

• 

а  



а

а а


а

 

 



  а

а



 

 

ǩ



 

а а  



ǩ

 

 



а

а а


  а

а

а  а



а

;

• 



а

а 

  а



а 

а

а



,  а

а

 



 

;

• 



а

а а    


 

,

 



а а

  а а а  ǩ

 а

а 

 



;

• 

ǩ



 

 

а а  



а  

а а


 

-

а 



а  

,  а


 

а

  а



а 

 а

;



Е

а

  Н.ů.  На а



а

  « а а


а

 

а а



  – 

  а а .  С

 

а

а  а а  



 

,  а а


а  

 

 



а

», - 


 а а  

 

а



. Тǩ

 

 



 – 

 

а  



,  ǩ

 

  ǩ



 

а   а


  ǩ

  – 


 

  а



.  С

а  


а 

 

а а а  



 

а

  а



 

а а


 

  а


  а - а

  а


а ,  ǩ

  а


 

а

 



а

  ǩ


 

а 

  а



а

 

.



ů

 

1. А


а

 Т «Ш


а

а

 



 а

а

  а



» А

а

, «Ра а » 1994



2. ů

 М «ů


 ǩ

»   А а а, «Ф

а

» 2004 .


3. Б

а а   «ů


 

 ǩ

» А



а

, «Ра а » 1997

4. Ж

а а


 М « П

а

а» А



а

, «Ра а » 1993

5. С

 

а  



а

 

  ǩ



  а  а

  а


 

а .



CREATING, ENHANCING AND MAINTAINING GIFTEDNESS

USING CRITICAL THINKING AND CONTEMPLATIVE PEDAGOGY

DEVELOPING A HUMANISTIC, MULTIDIMENSIONAL AND INTER-CULTURAL APPROACH TO 

TEACHING PRACTICE FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF SOCIAL REFORM

Lora Gumarova, Michael Little Crow

«Nazarbaev Intellectual School» in Uralsk

KAZAKHSTAN

А

а

а

Б

  а а а а а

а   а

  а

  ǩ

  ǩ

  а а   а а   а

 

а

а

 

ǩ

 

 

а  

а  

  а

 

   

 

.  З

 

ǩ

 

а

 

  а

    а

  а

 

    ǩ   ǩ  

а

 

-

 

 

а

 

 

    а а

а .

А

а

А

 

 

а

 

  а

 

а

  а 

 

а

 

 

 

   

а

.  У

 

а

   

 

а 

 

а  

 

  а

а

 

    а

 

а

    а

 

.  

Abstract

The authors pay attention to the possibility of giftedness using components of critical thinking in the classroom. 

The level of concentration and duration of sustained interest are key factors for the development of talent in every 

child.

Effective teaching for substantive change within society requires a focus not so much on how knowledge has 

been created but more on the purposes and uses of knowledge within a society.  Students must be encouraged “to 

take critical stances to give them power to take social action to improve their own lives and that of others [1,p.3].”  

When  working  with  gifted  students  the  characteristics  of  concentration,  fl exibility,  speed  of  thought  and  self 


494

regulation can be used not only to identify the gifted [2.p.20] but are also traits that when cultivated more deeply 

can create giftedness in students where it was not previously identifi ed, enhance giftedness in students where it 

has been identifi ed and maintain gifted performance throughout a student’s academic and working career.  A shift 

in teachers’ classroom schemata and perspective from the focus on transmission of content to the implementation 

of developmental, nurturing and social reform perspectives are required in order for these goals to be achieved.  

Our  paper  will  report  on  best  practices  for  assisting  teachers  to  adapt  their  classroom  schemata,  using  critical 

thinking  activities  with  product  and  process  approaches  to  establish  its  relevance  in  writing  arguments,  and  a 

contemplative pedagogical approach to teaching mathematics to enhance concentration and speed of thought.

Each teacher has a “map of classroom reality” referred to as their classroom schemata by Littlewood [3.p.1].  

These conceptions held by teachers are intimately tied to the culture in which they have grown up in and live in.  

Likewise, a teacher’s previous experience as a student in school provides them with assumptions on how people 

learn and what their conception of the role of student and teacher is.  Students also have their own schemata of 

classroom reality and while the conceptions held by different people in the classroom are not all the same, as long 

as there is enough similarity a convergence of the schemata can take place.

When  implementing  teacher  development  and  educational  change  to  increase  student  success,  individuals 

are exposed to new ideas and experiences which are intended to lead to an adaptation of their existing view of 

classroom reality.  The teacher’s mental map of classroom reality is infl uenced by their personal values, cultural 

and educational background, teacher education courses, in-service professional development and their encounters 

with new ideas.  The ongoing stimuli of daily experiences, refl ection and sharing of ides result in continual small 

changes on the schemata that compose a teacher’s mental map.  Some experiences have a suffi cient impact and 

strength on creating a radical alteration of some aspect of this map.  This is the desired infl uence of professional 

development activities, however “a key factor in this process is that teachers should themselves feel engaged with 

the ideas rather than having these simply imposed from outside. The mechanism that drives innovation forward is 

the process of communication and negotiation between the principal actors in the teaching-learning relationship 

[3.p.7].


With  gifted  students  especially  it  is  important  that  teachers  move  from  the  concept  of  transmission  of 

content to building understanding of meaning and from completely teacher directed interactions towards learner 

independence.  Through implementing a balanced range of activities teachers can build a pathway to innovation 

that gradually allows them to increase the amount of learner independence without suddenly relinquishing control 

over their class.  This task-based learning implemented by Morris et al [4,p.9] in Hong Kong schools resulted 

in incremental change in teacher practices towards the two dimensions of student understanding of meaning and 

independent learning.

Based on the survey, critical thinking can be a most signifi cant existing pedagogical concept, which facilities 

teaching and learning in Europe and in Kazakhstan. In other words, recent trends in the educational sphere stress 

the signifi cance of critical thinking skills necessary for academic success and for life. I have chosen to look at 

critical thinking in academic writing for junior learner. Learners are encouraged to question the validity of views 

in  texts  or  judge  the  views  of  other  people.  In  addition  they  are  to  fi lter  knowledge  of  all  kinds  through  their 

reasoning and determine logical fl aws instead of accepting them as they are. I assume that the sub-skills of critical 

thinking in academic writing among junior level learners are confused, which is not to say they are not practiced. 

As a former student I always had diffi culty in constructing effective arguments as a critical subskill in writing 

essay tasks. My role as a teacher is thus to facilitate necessary critical skills when a learner writes an academic 

piece of writing. This is why I have chosen to focus on teaching critical thinking in academic writing and to raise 

students’ awareness thereof.

I have chosen to focus on   argument as a critical subskill because I have experienced that junior level learners 

often fail to organize written argument.  This might be due to the fact that this subskill is usually defi ned as a 

statement of one’s claim which is supported by his/ her evidence along with the reasons [6, p. 142]. This can lead 

to what Hillocks [7, p.15] describes that although adolescents may intend to write an argument, they often see no 

need to present evidence or show why it is relevant; they merely express (usually vague) opinions. 


495

Within junior level I have limited my focus to teaching critical thinking in academic writing of an essay.

In this type of academic writing a teacher can teach and observe every pupil’s higher order thinking level and 

implement necessary fostering activities. These sophisticated forms of thinking enable a learner to express a set of 

reasons to support a conclusion and to make others believe that something is true.

 Researchers of the 20th century at different domains could realize that basic questions of Socrates would become 

baseline in critical thinking.  In 1906, William Graham Sumner, an American academic in sociology published 

his book “Folkways” where he mentioned symbiotic relationship between critical thinking and education. Later in 

1933 an American philosopher John Dewey attempted to describe critical thinking from philosophical perspective 

whereby education was intended as a tool for providing conditions to foster thinking habits [8, 193]. Hence, critical 

thinking is well - established vital skill which can occur   in various fi elds of science.

Furthermore, from that period critical thinking process could be regarded as higher level thinking skill which 

has several subskills and one of them is argument. In writing process, especially in academic writing, argument 

is  a  necessary  skill,  as  a  learner  has  to  convey  a  defi nite  view  or  position  with  the  intention  of  persuading  a 

possible audience in an assignment. Likewise Bloom’s Taxonomy is an assistant critical thinking tool and can be 

utilized in writing. According to Bloom’s Taxonomy the last three educational objectives in the linear continuum 

– Analysis,  Synthesis  and  Evaluation  can  be  related  to  higher-order  thinking  skills. Also  all      six  categories  of 

Bloom’s  Taxonomy  are  an  excellent  guideline  in  successful  academic  writing  [6.p.19].  Thus,  critical  thinking 

is  referred  to  higher  –  order  thinking  skill  and  Bloom’s Taxonomy  is  considered  as  its  schematic  continuation 

whereas it can be used as a reliable guide in writing.

In addition the subskill of critical thinking argument is used in two ways. These ways are accurately illustrated 

by Cottrell with different activities [5,p.38]. Argument is not similar to disagreement. A person cannot approve 

of someone’s position without clearly indicating why he does not agree or persuade his reader or listener to think 

differently. There is a difference between a position, an agreement, a disagreement, and an argument in critical 

thinking. All these terms defi ned by Cottrell in this way:

• 

‘Position can be defi ned as a point of view.



• 

Agreement can refer to concurrence with someone’s opinion.

• 

Disagreement can be defi ned as a different point of view from someone else.



• 

Argument can be used to refer to a point of view which has reasons to persuade or to support known or 

unknown audiences. It may also comprise disagreement if it is based on reasons’ [5,p.52]. Contributing argument 

can be defi ned as reasons of an individual person. The overall argument introduces author’s position and can be 

used to refer to a set of reasons, or contributing arguments which are organized to support it. Thus, an argument as 

a part of critical thinking comprises:

‘A position or point of view;

An attempt to persuade others to accept that point of view;

Reasons given to support the point of view’ [5 p. 40];

There are some key terms and phases in creating good argument. As a rule, main aim of authors   is to convince 

a reader or a listener to believe in what they are telling. Nevertheless, in some cases, authors can purposely or 

unintentionally  explain  information  differently  as  they  strive  to  compass  own  political  religious  or  ideological 

outlook, however, that does not make any argument invalid. Such statement is called a proposition and it may 

occur true or false. The last component in argument is conclusion where the authors’ main positions are reiterated 

[9,  p.25].  Moreover  it  is  important  to  keep  in  mind  that  whether  an  argument  can  be  logical  or  follow  closely 

mathematical construction of the syllogism in academic writing. Syllogism can be defi ned as a form of reasoning 

in which two propositions or premises are expressed and a logical conclusion is caused by them [10]. Hence, it is 

also necessary to be familiar with stages and key words for successful argument.

In addition features of argument will depend on explicit and implicit arguments. If a text contains arguments we 

are to differentiate implicit and explicit ones [11,p. 3]. If we look at implicit ones the argument may be hidden in 

the text. Explicit arguments’ nature contraries to implicit where the argument is presented in a relatively open way. 

There are six items which will lead a learner to identify a critical argument they are position, reasons/propositions, 



496

line of reasoning, conclusion, persuasion and signal word and phrases and six clues (start of passage, the end of a 

passage, interpretive summary, signal words, challenges and recommendations and words indicating a deduction) 

to fi nding the conclusion [5,p.47.]

There are three main approaches to the practice of writing skills both in and outside the classroom, they are 

process, product and genre approaches. Many educators identify process approach as the process wheel . As White 

and Arndt point out that ‘…..writing is  re-writing…re-vision-seeing with new eyes- has a central role to play in 

the act of creating text’  [12.p. 326].The process approach helps  a learner to analyze each stage step by step  in 

academic writing and also  process itself fosters  learners’ thoughts. Moreover, it can be tended to time consuming 

approach. It can be presented with communicative-task based method.

Another approach to teaching writing is the so called genre approach. The genre approach can be regarded as 

social approach because ‘genre analysis attempts to show how the structure of particular text-types are shaped by 

the purposes they serve in specifi c social and cultural context’[13,p. 2]. Therefore, a text is analyzed in functional 

and in linguistic aspects where a learner has to differentiate in style, language and layout.

The last approach in teaching writing is product (or model text) approach. Its focus on producing a text that 

reproduces the model [13p. 249], particularly this paper’s basic strategies of teaching argument   in academic writing 

will be carried out by product approach. There are four stages which facilitate a learner to be more competent 

in certain aspects of a particular context. Additionally, a teacher can combine product and  process approaches 

to teach structure in order to familiarize with contributing arguments and the overall argument or with the rest 

components of critical argument in writing which help a learner to write a good argument.  As for critical argument 

learners would probably be given a gap fi ll text where they would be asked to create the overall argument.  And in 

the end, every learner can produce his own product by imitating the sample text. Thus, process  approach helps a 

learner to revise or to introduce with any model texts and facilitate a learner’s motivation in writing.

This  involves  little  visual  pressure;  learners  do  not  prematurely  ask  to  explain  and  presenting  time  allows 

them to keep in mind initial distinctive features of two arguments. For the teacher, this is convenient to present the 

layout and ways of structuring information. For learners, main benefi ts lie in a great challenge for precision and 

clarifi cation of the nature of critical argument, providing clear margins for further identifi cation.

Secondly,  designed  to  practice  identifying  simple  arguments.  Carefully  formulated  set  of  passages  for 

recognizing which are arguments, and which are not. These passages can be reordered if they help to fi nd real 

arguments.

Personally, I question the relevance of both materials for learners, nevertheless I can combine product with 

element of process approach.

 In this stage learners will be given some time to isolate key information in a passage and then they write down 

in their own words the overall argument through identifying propositions and conclusion. In all, if learners are 

aware the fact that they will produce, I believe, they will be more attentive through the lesson stages. This also 

increases a learner’s autonomy and by the end, be able to write similar tasks better at home.  For the teacher, this is 

a time when teacher can vary interactive patterns which has positive impact on learners’ motivation.

Feedback will have to take place in the form of monitoring, at present, it is the only way and however, I am 

interested in this experiment and hope to conduct such experiments in my future classes.

Contemplative pedagogy involves teaching methods designed to cultivate deepened awareness, concentration, 

and insight. Contemplation fosters additional ways of knowing that complement the rational methods of traditional 

liberal  arts  education.    As  Tobin  Hart  states,  “Inviting  the  contemplative  simply  includes  the  natural  human 

capacity for knowing through silence, looking inward, pondering deeply, beholding, witnessing the contents of 

our consciousness…. These approaches cultivate an inner technology of knowing….” This cultivation is the aim 

of contemplative pedagogy, teaching that includes methods “designed to quiet and shift the habitual chatter of the 

mind to cultivate a capacity for deepened awareness, concentration, and insight.” 

Modern  math  methods  have  just  one  way  of  doing  an  operation,  say  division  and  this  is  so  cumbersome 

and  tedious  that  students  are  now  encouraged  to  use  a  calculator.    The  Vedic  system,  on  the  other  hand,  has 

many methods for the same operation to choose from.  This element of choice in the Vedic System, and even of 


497

innovation, together with the mental approach, brings a new dimension to the study and practice of mathematics.  

The variety and simplicity of the methods brings fun and amusement, the mental practice leads to a more refl ective, 

alert, and intelligent mind leading to greater innovation and concentration.

It may seem strange to some people that mathematics could be based on sixteen word-formulas; but mathematics, 

more  patently  than  other  systems  of  thought  is  constructed  by  internal  laws,  natural  principles  inherent  in  our 

consciousness and by whose action more complex edifi ces are constructed.  From the very beginning of life there 

must be some structure in consciousness enabling the young child to organize its perceptions, learn and evolve.  If 

these principles could be formulated and used they would give us the easiest and most effi cient system possible for 

all our mental enquiries.  This contemplative approach to teaching math has been shared in three hour workshops 

with over three hundred school math teachers in the United States including Arizona state, Chicago City College 

system and Nebraska state.  Comments from teachers on follow-up surveys endorse the system as an effective 

means to increase the concentration ability of students, not just in math but in all academic areas.    This research 

confi rms that this contemplative form of inquiry can offset the constant distractions of the modern multi-tasking, 

multi-media culture. 

Gifted students require focused and challenging curriculum along with encouragement to be able to fully develop 

and  express  their  talents. Teachers  are  a  key  part  to  the  provision  of  opportunities  for  an  enriched  educational 

experience.    Through  organic  professional  development,  use  of  critical  thinking  activities  and  contemplative 

pedagogy the characteristics of concentration, speed of thought, fl exibility and self regulation of gifted students 

can be leveraged to create greater lifelong expressions of their talents.




1   ...   107   108   109   110   111   112   113   114   ...   129


©emirsaba.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал