Іі халы аралы ылыми-тůжірибелік конференциясы а



жүктеу 24.47 Mb.

бет77/129
Дата15.03.2017
өлшемі24.47 Mb.
1   ...   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   ...   129

а

а С

а  К

а а

а

Е

 



  «Та

 

» а



 

 а

 



  а  

 «Та


 

»  а


 

  а


а

 

 



  а

 

.  Б



 

 

 



а а

 

 



а  

 

а  



 

а

а



  а

а  а


а

.  А  


  

 

 



а

а

а 



а

  ǩ   а


 

 

.  Ж



а 

:  Жа

  

а



  ǩ

 

  а



а 

а   а


а а

 

а



 

 

а



.  Е

 

 



 

а

а



а 

а

а :  Б



  ǩ

 

а а 



а

а  


а

а    


а

а , 



 

а

  а



   

 

  а



а  


 

а   


 

 

 



а а

а

 



 

 



 

  а


а 

  а


 

  а а   а



 

  9  А 


  9В 

а  



 

а   а а


а

  а


а

а



 

;  а


а а 

 

а а   



а

а 

,   



  а  

 

 



 

а



  ǩ  

а

 ǩ



 

а а  а


. 2010 

  а


 а

а А а а  а а

а 

  «П


 

    а


 

а

а» а



  Г.Б. Г

 

а



а  а

а  


  ǩ

 

а



  ǩ

 

 



 

а

  а а 



.

Т

  а



а

 



  а

а 

  а а  а



  а

а

  а а  а



а

 

а , 



 

 

ǩ



  а

а

  а 



  а

 а а-а а а



 ǩ

 

а а  а



а

,  а


 

 

а



 

а

 



  а

 а

  ǩ



 

  ǩ


   а

а

 



а

а 

а



а

 

 а



; а

  а


 

  а


а а

а ; 


  а

 

 



а

а

  а



а

 

 



 

 

а



;  а

 

а а



 

 

а



.

  

  ů



 

1. Д


а Н.И. На

 – 


а

а   а


а   

. -  М:В


 – М, М

а,2001. .48



343

2. Ма


 A.M. П

 

а



   

   


. — М.: П

а

а, 1972. – С.35.    



3. http://zim-angel.ucoz.ru/   .1 (08.11.2012 )

4. http://festival.1september.ru/  .1 (08.11.2012 )



ONGOING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IS ESSENTIAL

Belyavskaya L.I.

Nazarbayev Intellectual School  of Physics-Maths Kokshetau

KAZAKHSTAN

А

а

а

Ма а а а 

а

  а а а

 

а а

а  ǩ

  а

 

  а

а

 

 ǩ

 



 

 

а  

а  

 

 

а а  а

а 

а   а а а 

 

.  А а  

 

  а

а

  а

а а а 

 

а

 

-

  а

 

а а

а



 

 

а

 

 ǩ

  а

а



 

  а а 



  а

 

  а

 

ǩ

  а

а 

а а  

а а

.

А

а



а

 

 

  а

а



 

а

  а

 

   

 

.  П

 

 

 

 

 

 

  а  а

 

   

 

. И

 

  а

    а



 

а

  а

а



а

   

 

 

   



 

 

 

 

а

 

а

 

 

  а  а

 

а



    а 

 

 

а 

.

Abstract

The Article deals with the problem of ongoing professional development of teachers in this competitive world 

of  today  which  enables  both  teachers  and  students    to  obtain  necessary  skills  and  knowledge  to  be  successful 

professionals and willing to learn students. The author shows the impact of a Critical Thinking course organized 

by  the  AOA    “Nazarbayev  Intellectual  schools”  and  provided  by  the  specialists  from  Cambridge  on  further 

professional development of the teacher, her  colleagues and students.

  The  21st  Century  Learners  are  assumed  to  be  collaborative,  adaptive,  information,  media  and  technology 

savvy,  communicators,  immediate  and  instant,  require  instant  gratifi cation,  creators  and  adaptor  and  thus  the 

society  expects  the teacher  to  be  creative,  constructive and  technologically  trained  to  adapt  these  means  in  the 

classroom  teaching  situations. Teachers  cleave  to  a  very  elevated  and  esteemed  position  as  parents  trust  them. 

They also believe that the qualities like tolerance, acceptance, a wider view, global awareness, refl ection and equal 

justice rests within the teachers to shape their child in all possible ways to face this competitive world of today.

 Being a teacher means taking on a complex role, a role that is in constant fl ux that needs constant redefi nition 

according to the learner or the child. Teaching requires knowledge, skill, commitment and caring. Preparing to 

teach requires effort and time. It was William Butler Yates who said: “Teaching is not fi lling a pail, but lighting a 

fi re.” And it is the teacher’s role to strike the sparks.

According to educational philosophy, a teacher basically has to three roles the fi rst is the role in the class room, 

having to do with classroom management, the second is the role towards the students, it has to do with the personal 

interaction between the teacher and the learner, and the third is the role towards him- or herself, the commitment 

of the teacher to continued personal development, to be the best he or she can be. 

To  be  an  effective  teacher  requires  a  com bination  of  professional  knowledge  and  spe cialized  skills  as  well 

as your own personal experiences and qualities. And adding to the knowledge base and acquiring new skills are 

among the main reasons teachers participate in professional development activities [1,Bailey, Curtis, and Nunan 



344

2001].  For  both  a  novice  teacher  and  a  veteran    learning  about  new  ideas  and  techniques  in  English  language 

teaching can be motivating and encouraging.

Many English language teaching experts believe that ongoing professional develop ment is essential, especially 

in  today’s  world  of  constantly  changing  technology.  Teachers  of  English  who  have  been  trained  to  use  new 

techniques and resources are more inclined to try them with their students [2,Chisman and Crandall 2007].

Teachers  all  around  the  world  face  similar  challenges  due  to  the  very  nature  of  school  environments. They 

teach their classes inde pendently from their colleagues, which makes them feel isolated. Professional development 

activities can bring together teachers who have similar experiences and interests. Just having the opportunity to 

share experiences and ideas with colleagues can help a teacher gain a sense of community and belonging.

One of the main reasons to pursue profes sional development is to be empowered—to have the opportunity and 

the confi dence to act upon your ideas as well as to infl uence the way you perform in your profession. Empow-

erment is the process through which teachers become capable of engaging in, sharing con trol of, and infl uencing 

events and institutions that affect their lives. As teachers, we have the capacity to empower ourselves if we keep 

in mind the following precepts: 

• Be positive.

• Believe in what you are doing and in yourself.

• Be proactive, not reactive.

• Be assertive, not aggressive.

Critical Thinking course that was organized by the AOA “Nazarbayev Intellectual schools” and provided by 

the  specialists  from  Cambridge  made  me  think  about  my  further  professional  development  through  improving 

my critical thinking skills, involving the teachers of our school in to a critical thinking community, helping our 

students to obtain and develop the CT skills.  Critical thinking is foundational to the effective teaching and learning 

of any subject. Critical thinking, deeply understood, provides a rich set of concepts that enable us to think our 

way through any subject or discipline, through any problem or issue.[3,p.1 ] [Richard Paul] details a substantive, 

deep concept of critical thinking as one that has a signifi cant array of implications for teaching and learning. The 

concept as Paul presents it implies that:

• 

Content is a product of thinking and can be learned only through thinking



• 

All subjects exist only as modes of thinking

• 

There  are  essential  structures  in  all  reasoning  within  all  subjects  (that  enable  us  to  understand  those 



subjects)

• 

There are intellectual standards that must be used to assess reasoning within all subjects



• 

There are traits of mind that must be fostered if one is to become a disciplined thinker, able to reason well 

within multiple, and even confl icting, viewpoints

• 

The  only  way  to  learn  a  subject  is  to  construct  the  ideas  in  the  subject  in  one’s  thinking  using  one’s 



thinking. 

   With this substantive concept and its implications clearly in mind, we realize that robust critical thinking 

should be the guiding force for all of our educational efforts.  Critical thinking, rightly understood, is not one of 

many possible “angles” for professional development. Rather it should be the guiding force behind any and all 

professional development. 

    Teacher  development  opportunities  can  take  many  forms.  Some  are  individual  or  informal  while  other 

occasions are collective or structured. The most obvious professional development activity for an English teacher 

is reading journal articles about teaching Eng lish; reading journals (and maybe even writing an article for one) 

keeps  you  informed  about  new  trends  and  research  developments.  How ever,  I  will  focus  on  activities  that  are 

active and interactive and that often involve refl ective teaching.



Refl ective teaching

 A myriad of defi nitions exists for refl ective teaching; some describe individual practices while others explain 

what  a  group  of  like-minded  teachers  could  do.  Many  research ers  believe  that  teachers  can  learn  a  great  deal 


345

about  the  reasons  behind  their  teach ing  philosophies  and  practices  by  examining  their  experiences  and  asking 

and  answering  questions  about  them  [4,  Richards  and  Far rell  2005;  Bailey,  Curtis,  and  Nunan  2001;  Zeichner 

and Liston 1996]. No approach to refl ective teaching is superior to another; in fact, language teachers can learn 

strategies from other academic disciplines.

I  see  refl ec tive  practice  as  a  fundamental  part  of  con tinuing  professional  development;  it  provides    with 

opportunities to analyze and ask questions about  objectives as well as to examine how I plan and what I teach. 

teacher  engaged in refl ective teaching practices is someone who

• is able to identify, analyze, and attempt to solve problems that occur in the classroom; 

• is conscious of and questions his or her beliefs about language teaching;

• is cognizant of the institutional and cultural contexts in which he or she teaches;

• is responsible for his or her own profes sional development.

On an individual level, refl ection can help a teacher develop a greater awareness of his or her own teaching as 

well as a better under standing of student learning. [5, p.1](Farrell 1998) states that refl ective teaching helps free 

teach ers from impulsive behavior or, on the other extreme, from monotony in their teaching; it also allows teachers 

to develop their own educational perspectives.

Teachers  can  also  benefi t  from  sharing  their  refl ective  teaching  experiences  with  their  colleagues;  some 

methods of sharing are infor mal while others tend to follow a specifi c framework. One way to take control of one’s 

own learning is through cooperation with other teachers. Collegial cooperation can help teachers become more 

assertive and decisive about their personal learning; it can also boost their confi dence and empower them to fi nd 

solutions to challenges they face in their teaching. [5, p.2]

When  teachers  collaborate  in  refl ective  teaching  practices,  it  is  important  to  keep  in  mind  that  the  most 

benefi cial and effective approaches are the ones that give all the par ticipants, you and your partner(s), the chance 

to assess your teaching in a nonjudgmental and supportive manner. Probably the most diffi cult aspect of collegial 

collaboration  is  making  a  commitment  to  the  method  you  decide  to  put  into  practice.  Finding  time  in  a  busy 

teaching schedule is challenging, but such an experience can lead to added self-confi dence and new inspiration in 

how you approach language teaching.

I made up my mind to try out on my own fi rst  and then perhaps use with colleagues and the Eng lish language 

teaching community  such a technique as:

Individual technique: Keep a teaching journal

Writing down observations and thoughts about your teaching is one way to gain insight about the how’s and 

why’s behind your teach ing style as well as a means to document what goes on in your classroom. By keeping a 

journal, teachers can examine the details that indicate why a particular lesson was successful or why one was not. 

How likely are you to accurately remember the subtleties of what happened during a lesson a month, or even a 

week, later? The process of describing events, asking questions, and formulating hypotheses can reveal aspects of 

language teaching that further a teacher’s own professional develop ment [6,p.1] (Bailey, Curtis, and Nunan 2001)

There are many ways to keep a teaching journal. Some teachers consider the process of writing a journal to be 

informal and per sonal, a kind of private, professional diary. You might write about classroom activities, student-

teacher interactions, and your feelings about a particular lesson—how successful it was, what factors affected the 

lesson’s success (or lack thereof), what you might do the next time you teach that lesson, how students’ reac tion to 

the lesson might infl uence how you proceed in the next class, and so on.

It is important to identify a particular goal, or goals, to write about in your teaching jour nal. Getting in the habit 

of writing about your teaching may take time. In the beginning, it may be diffi cult to write freely (without edit ing 

yourself), but give yourself time to get used to keeping a teaching journal. With a little bit of patience, as well as 

the determina tion to write in your journal on a regular basis, you will begin to see patterns not only in your journal 

entries but also in your teaching. Writ ing down questions and ideas to think about later can help you direct your 

focus on the goal you wish to achieve. 

    Another technique for self-development as a part of professional development I  willingly do is observation. 

This year we are working on peer observation in a small groups of teachers. Teacher observation is one more model  



346

of professional learning that “is key to supporting a new vision for professional development,” [7,p.2. ].  (explained 

Stephanie Hirsh, deputy executive director of the National Staff Development Council (NSDC) The new vision, 

according to Hirsh, involves teacher teams that meet daily to study standards, plan joint lessons, examine student 

work, and solve common problems. Team members then apply that learning in the classroom, watching each other 

teach and providing regular feedback.    



Teacher observation.

          Teacher  observation  should  be  part  of  a  pool  of  professional  development  opportunities,  Sparks  told 

Education World. One way in which peer observation can be very effective is when teachers acquire new  skills 

or  ideas  at  conferences  and  then  model  those  new  approaches  for  their  colleagues.  That  is  best  done  through 

observation, said Sparks, who advocates learning in the school, rather than through “pull-out” training, such as 

workshops. Professional development should be job-embedded, he emphasized. That is one of the greatest benefi ts 

of teachers observing other teachers. Critical Elements of Teacher Observation as Professional Development

Ensuring  school  leaders  advocate  and  support  teacher  observation  as  a  valid  form  of  professional 



development

Building a community of trust among faculty



Establishing a school-wide commitment to the approach

Separating observation from the teacher evaluation process



Declaring the purpose for teacher observation and a commitment to its outcomes

Inviting teachers to fi rst participate in the process as volunteers



Allowing time for teachers to observe other teachers

Organizing scheduled meetings, coaching sessions, and follow-up conversations



Creating teams that share students

Selecting specifi c strategies and skills on which to focus during an observation session



Instituting a way to measure the impact of observation

 I learn very much  from observation, it is benefi cial for my  professional development . Observation brings 

actual practice to the forefront.  A variety of approaches to teacher observation support professional growth and 

student achievement. The following are several of those methods:

Lesson  Study  --  In  this  three-pronged  approach  designed  by  Japanese  educators,  teachers  collaboratively 

develop a lesson, observe it being taught to students, and then discuss and refi ne it.



Peer Coaching -- In this non-evaluative professional development strategy, educators work together to discuss 

and share teaching practices, observe each other’s classrooms, provide mutual support, and, in the end, enhance 

teaching to enrich student learning.

Cognitive  Coaching  -- Teachers  are  taught  specifi c  skills  that  involve  asking  questions  so  that  the  teacher 

observed is given the opportunity to process learning associated with teaching the lesson.



Critical  Friends  Group  (CFG)  --  This  program  provides  time  and  structure  in  a  teacher’s  schedule  for 

professional growth linked to student learning. Each CFG is composed of eight to 12 teachers and administrators, 

under  the  guidance  of  at  least  one  coach,  who  meet  regularly  to  develop  collaborative  skills,  refl ect  on  their 

teaching  practices,  and  look  at  student  work.  [8,p.1]  (See  an  Education World  article,  Critical  Friends  Groups: 

Catalysts for School Change).

Learning Walk -- The Learning Walk, created by the Institute for Learning at the University of Pittsburgh, is 

a process that invites participants to visit several classrooms to look at student work and classroom artifacts and 

to talk with students and teachers. Participants then review what they have learned in the classroom by making 

factual  statements  and  posing  questions  about  the  observations.  The  end  result  is  that  teachers  become  more 

refl ective about their teaching practices. Professional development is always linked to The Learning Walks.

The professional development that a teacher values depends on what he or she needs at any given time. So 

a teacher struggling with classroom management can improve his or her skills by observing a peer in a safe and 

inclusive  learning  environment.  Being  observed  by  the  same  peer    leads  to  suggestions  about  how  to  handle 

behavior  problems,  as  well  as  opportunities  to  share  successful  teaching  approaches  with  the  observer.  Most 


347

important to effective teacher observation is that it be student-focused. The emphasis needs to be on how things 

can be done differently in the classroom to ensure that students succeed academically.

  Through  practical  teaching  and  learning  strategies,  teachers  abandon  the  didactic  approach,  abandon  rote 

memorization, and begin to teach subjects as ways to think more effectively about the world, as ways of asking 

important  questions  and  getting  important  answers. They  approach  content  through  leading  ideas  that  tie  other 

ideas together and make learning more simple and logical. They model the thinking they want students to learn, 

engage the students in the thinking they model, and hold students responsible for the thinking they do.

Ongoing professional development  is essential as it enables us  be  effective teachers in  the modern world. 

And every teacher is free to choose the way for self-development, to use different techniques and methods. I have 

decided upon those mentioned above.



1   ...   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   ...   129


©emirsaba.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал