Іі халы аралы ылыми-тůжірибелік конференциясы а



жүктеу 24.47 Mb.

бет75/129
Дата15.03.2017
өлшемі24.47 Mb.
1   ...   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   ...   129

Abstract

The report deals with the obligations of schooling process, the introduction of online teaching and internet 

technologies  throughout  the  learning  activities.  The  fi nal  data  of  used  implementations  show  us  the  high  level 

creativity of students. Hence it follows the report opens the wide range of possibilities to develop student’s creative 

skills and the ways how to turn them to communicate in English without any preparation by sitting in front computer 

with internet connection.

As civilization is becoming more and more intelligent there are various ways to make lessons as interesting as 

possible. In 21

st

 century, which is called an internet epoch, teachers can optimize any approach using computer, 



web, and multimedia technologies. Technologies exist in schools to enhance instruction and to support student 

learning. In any modern teaching process in the creation and application of information technology there is always 

applied computer science. In the fi eld of development of information systems the teaching was formulated as the 

following:[1,p.35].

-Development and adaptation of software systems based on learning multimedia

-Elaboration of data bases and knowledge bases

-Training and retraining of teachers

-Integration into regional and other external network

Each of these tasks has its own sub-task on the fi eld of information. Technology of education is the informational 

if  it  relies  heavily  on  computer  tools  and  methods  for  receiving,  processing,  and  transmission  and  displays 

educational information. The effects of computerization is almost identical with the sources of the intensifi cation 

of the educational process: the speed of handling extensive and easily updated knowledge bases and data banks in 

friendly dialogue, the possibility of inference, the ability to simulate games, personalization, and the possibility 

of collective learning in local and global networks. These and other features of media naturally stimulate learning 

processes at all stages of learning. The use of interactive information systems increases the dynamics of teaching 

and learning tasks, the process of their implementation, as well as self-control, self-assessment and evaluation of 

the success of training. Computerization and Informational technologies, being powerful teacher skills, are at the 

same time a new source and a stimulus to self-improvement.[2,p.32]. The positive effects of informative education 

are mostly clearly shown in:

- Studying basis of complex patterns of discipline and algorithms, dynamic processes;

- The implementation of games and simulations;

- Organization of research and training processes;

- Automation of self-control, monitoring, evaluation of training;

- Documenting the most signifi cant operational results;[3,p.112]

In my attempts to improve classroom work mainly seeking ways and ideas for students’ involvement, I turned 

to  onlie  interaction  teaching  and  tried  out  many  of  its  principles.  My  efforts  in  the  past  year  seemed  to  have 

worked. The major characteristics of interactive online teaching can be found in the following. If the cultivation 

of communicative skills in the target language is the goal of education, then online interaction must be present 

in  the  learning  process.  Since  real  communication  is  interaction  between  people  and  linguistic  interaction  is  a 

collaborative activity, some learning activities must be interactive in web. So, because of limited time of teaching 

English (In Kazakh Pedagogical College named after Zhanaidar Mussin lessons traditionally last 80 minutes).We 

took extra-curricular tasks in form of online interaction. The missions were to make an overview on the themes 

they had just learned. The following social networks helped students in production their replies.  

1. 


Create a “mail.ru” “group” (private/invite only)and use the wall as the class discussion board. Students 

are notifi ed by home page notifi cation when someone replies to their thread.

2. 

Message all members of your Facebook group with one click; this will reach your students much faster 



than an email, because most of them check  Facebook regularly.

332

3. 


Fan Page - An alternative to a group is a “fan” page, which has the advantage that your “status updates” 

will show up for students on their Live Feed. Disadvantage: some students turn off Live Feed and only see status 

updates of their friends.

4. 


Direct Facebook Friendship - Allowing your students to “friend” you will give you unfettered access to 

them (unless they’ve set up a special role for you), but more

5. 

importantly, your status updates will be visible to them on the home page (unless they



6. 

block you manually). Disadvantage: too much information will be revealed on both sides, unless both you 

and the students set up “lists” with limited access allowed.

7. 


Report from the Field – Students use smart phones to record their observations while witnessing an event/

location related to the course of study, capturing more honest and spontaneous reactions

8.  Twitter Clicker Alternative - In large classes, a hash tag can amalgamate all posts by your students in 

one  place,  giving  them  a  free-response  place  to  provide  feedback  or  guess  at  a  right  answer. Also  useful  for 

brainstorming.

9.  Backchannel Conversations in Large Classes – unlike a whispered conversation, a Twitter conversation 

(searchable by agreed-upon hash tag) becomes a group discussion. Students may also help out other students who 

missed a brief detail during the lecture.

10.  Follow an Expert – Luminaries in many disciplines, as well as companies and

governmental agencies, often publish a Twitter feed. Reading such updates provides a

way to stay current.

11.  Tweeted Announcements  -  Instead  of  Blackboard,  they  used  Twitter  to  send  out  announcements  like 

cancelled classes.

12.  Student Summaries - Make one student the “leader” for tweets; she posts the top fi ve important concepts 

from each session to twitter (one at a time); other students follow her feed for discussion/disagreements

13.  Quick Contact - Since sharing cell phone numbers is risky, instructors may wish to let students follow 

them on Twitter and send Direct Messages that way.

14.  Community-Building - A Twitter group for your specifi c class creates inclusiveness and belonging.

15.  Twitter Projects – Tweet works and other apps can enable student groups to communicate with each other 

more easily.

16.  Brainstorm  -  Small  Twitter  assignments  can  yield  unexpected  brainstorming  by  students,  since  it’s 

happening “away” from the LMS.  

17.  Twitter  Poll  –  Poll  Daddy  and  other  apps  enable Twitter  to  gather  interest,  information,  attitudes,  and 

guesses.


18.  Post Links - News stories and other websites can be linked via Twitter (services such as bit.ly will shorten 

URLs).


19.  Video Demonstrations - Using a webcam, record a demonstration relevant to your topic and post it to 

YouTube.


20.  Interactive Video Quizzes - Using annotations (text boxes) and making them

hyperlinks to other uploaded videos, instructors can construct an on-screen “multiple

choice” test leading to differentiated video reactions, depending on how the student

answers. Requires fi lming multiple videos and some editing work.

21.  Movie Clips - Show brief segments of popular movies to illustrate a point, start a

conversation, have students hunt for what the movie gets wrong, etc.

22.  Embed Into PowerPoint - YouTube videos can be embedded into PPT as long as there is an active Internet 

connection; create a Shockwave Flash object in the Developer tab, and add the URL for “Movie” in the properties. 

Alternative: use one-button plug-in from iSpring Free.

23.  Shared Account  –  Instructor  creates  a  generic  YouTube  username/account  and  gives  the  password  to 

everyone in the class, so student uploads all go to the same place.

24.  Group Wiki Projects - Instead of emailing a document back and forth,



333

student groups can collaborate in real time with a free wiki such as wikispaces.com

25.  Wiki Class Notes - Offering a class wiki for the optional sharing of lecture notes aids students who miss 

class, provides a tool for studying, and helps students see the material from more than one perspective.

26.  Questions to Students -  Use the blog to “push” questions and discussion prompts to students like you 

would email, but in a different forum.

27.  Provide  Links  - The  native  HTML  nature  of  the  blog  makes  it  easy  to  give  links  to  news  stories  and 

relevant websites.

28.  Substitute for Blackboard Discussion Board - Students can comment on each post (or previous comment) 

and engage in a dialogue that is similar to Blackboard, but while out in the Internet in general.

29.  Electronic Role Play - Students create their own blogs, and write diary-type entries while role-playing as 

someone central to one’s content.

Ways of interaction

Online Chat

Online Chat

Online Evaluation

Pre-Class Writing

E-Mail Feedback

For  classes  meeting 

at least partially in an 

online

e n v i r o n m e n t , 



instructors 

can 


simulate  the  benefi ts 

gained by a chat-room 

discussion 

(more 


participation 

from 


reserved  instructors) 

without 


requiring 

everyone 

to 

meet 


in  a  chat  room  for 

specifi c 



length 

of  time.  The  day 

begins  with  a  post 

from  the  instructor 

in  a  discussion  board 

forum. 


Students 

respond to the prompt, 

and continue to check 

back all  day, reading 

their  peers’  posts  and 

responding  multiple 

times 

throughout 



the  day  to  extend 

discussion.

To  gauge  a  quick 

response to a topic or 

reading  assignment, 

post  a  question,  and 

then allow students to 

chat in a synchronous 

environment  for  the 

next  10  minutes  on 

the  topic.  A  quick 

examination  of  the 

chat  transcript  will 

reveal  a  multitude 

of 

opinions 



and 

directions  for  further 

discussion.  In  online 

environments,  many 

students  can  “talk”  at 

once, with less chaotic 

and  more  productive 

results than in a face-

to-face environment.

For  those  teaching  in 

online  environments, 

schedule a time which 

students  can  log  on 

anonymously 

and 

provide 


feedback 

about 


the 

course 


and  your  teaching. 

Understand,  however, 

that anonymity online 

sometimes 

breeds 

a  more  aggressive 



response 

than 


anonymity in print.

A  few  days  before 

your 

computer-



mediated class begins, 

have students respond 

in  an  asynchronous 

environment 

to 



prompt  about  this 



week’s  topic.  Each 

student  should  post 

their  response  and  at 

least  one  question  for 

further 

discussion. 

During 

the 


face-

to-face 


meeting, 

the 


instructor 

can 


address some of these 

questions  or  areas 

not  addressed  in  the 

asynchronous forum.

Instructor 

poses 


questions  about  his 

teaching  via  e-mail; 

students 

reply 


anonymously.

Then  students  brought  the  paper  sheets  printed  out  from  the  web  archive  to  the  classroom.  I  examined  the 

dialogues carefully out of class. Day by day pupils used much more words, fi nally become a bit better fl uent in 

English


During the next phase of the lesson, one group of six children was designated  to work together on a task at the 

interactive white board. The group task was similar to the one in the whole-class activity, except that the starting 

temperature was indicated by a bar on the temperature scale and the value by which the temperature will rise or fall 

was given. The student was expected to use the interactive white board pen to indicate the resulting temperature on 

the scale, and feedback was given (a pop-up message onscreen together with an audible ‘hoorah’ if correct or ‘uh-

uh’ if incorrect). In either case, the software immediately provided another question with randomly chosen values 



334

constrained to give answers within the range -10 to 10. The goal was to maximize the number of correct answers 

in 2 min, and a score was shown continuously, together with the time remaining.

The group was briefed to discuss the answer to each question before entering a response. This strategy proved 

effective in gaining correct answers and the feedback sound for an incorrect answer was never heard.

Students involved in interactive methods by implementation web sources for teaching action potentials had 

signifi cantly higher correct responses on the assessment when compared with students who had been exposed to 

the material through traditional interactive methods. 

Student  responses  from  evaluations  indicated  that  they  found  the  incorporation  of  new  technologies  in 

interactive  teaching  methods  to  be  a  positive  experience  that  improved  their  ability  to  understand  and  retain 

class material. In addition, students seemed to prefer this type of teaching when compared with instruction using 

traditional interactive activities.

The major principles of interactive online language teaching have worked in my classrooms. Our students have 

benefi ted a lot although I found it a bit demanding. The teacher talk was reduced, and the students’ talking time is 

increased. 

Another peculiarity of usage the interactive is that students are put in the centre of the action, where they use 

the language and practice communicative speech. For instance in our case it is the interactive activities, its purpose 

is to encourage the learners to work things out for themselves. It is an extended language activity, focusing on 

the topics, themes. As well as computer, interactive white board, audio-visual aids also facilitate the work of the 

teachers.

  In  our  work  we  just  mentioned  some  of  the  problems  that  teachers  with  large  classes  face  when  teaching 

communication in the classroom. We must say that it is impossible to cover all the details of the current issue in 

one work, we made an attempt to look at the English teaching from another angle and offered our own possible 

solutions above. 

New technologies have the potential to enrich both the teaching and learning process. Within the teaching and 

learning of English new technology can be used in a range of ways. We came to the conclusion that interactive 

activities promote:

• 

Collecting student work on the Internet (Twitter, Facebook, You tube, ICQ) as a bank of resources



• 

Having an extra-curricular part with book, theatre reviews etc.

• 

Using email to mail shot those interested with new resources, ideas etc.



 

Teachers all over the world continue to face the same hurdles, but any teacher who has overcome these 

diffi culties and now has a large class of energetic students talking and working in English in groups together will 

tell you it is worth all the trial and error and effort at the outset.

What is signifi cant is that the students are encouraged to think in the target language, to discover, to research, 

and to be creative individuals. Apart from the fi ndings and suggestions presented above, we propose that language 

teachers take a humanistic approach and trust their learners genuinely. They should be able to enhance learning and 

to stimulate learners into meaningful, communicative use of the target language. Their own maintenance of a lively 

attention and active participation among learners in the classroom is also of vital importance.

 Analyzing the benefi ts of interactive approach I came to conclusion that it is a teaching strategy that could 

stimulate imaginative and conceptual thinking amongst students. Also children get more interested if the interactive 

new technologies are introduced in their learning process. 

The interactive online methods for teaching action potentials increased understanding and retention. Therefore, 

fi rst of all provides excellent teaching training, partly by enhancing the ability of fellows to integrate innovative 

teaching methods into their instruction.   

Importantly, it is anticipated that a method of this nature will be appreciated in Kazakhstani schools. It will be 

quite exciting especially for students who are hitherto used to the traditional lecture method which is sometimes 

quite less interactive. 



335

References

1. 


Е

а А.Т К


а

 

 



 

а

 



   


а.  

А

а



:  Б

а



а

, 2006.


2. 

Н

а  А.Б.  М



а   

 

а



 

   


 

А



а

: В


, 2006.

3. 


Nunan. D. Language Teaching Methodology. UK: Prentice Hall International, 2001.

ФИЗИКА САБА ТАРЫНДА О ЫТУ БАРЫСЫН ЖА САРТУДА ЖЕТІ МОДУЛЬДІ  ОЛДАНУ

Б

а

а Ж. Н.

№1 

а

 

а 

 

 

 

а  ǩ  

а

Ба

  а а

а  

, О а   а а

а а

а  Р

а

А

а

а

Ба

а а а 

а  а а

а

а 

 

  а а  

 

  а

а а

 

 

а



а

а а 

а

 

а

 

 

а а .  Б

 

  а а

а 

а

 

 

а

а а а 



  ǩ

 

 

  а



а

а

 

а

а 



 

 

 

 

а

 а а

а 

а

а

 

а ,  а а

 

 

а

а 

 а а  

.

А

а

В 

а



  а

 

 



 

  а 


а  

   


 

   


 

а

   



а

 

,  а 



а

  а  а


 

 

а



.  Э

 



 

 

  а 



а , 

а

 



 

а

   



а

 



 

 



   

а, 


а  

 

а.



Abstract

In article ideas of seven modular techniques at physics lessons in the course of training and use way in the 

practical activities, developing thoughts of the being trained are mentioned. These modules which are skillfully 

applied by the teacher at lessons, lift interest of pupils to a subject, increase creative activity, cooperation of the 

teacher and the pupil, it reaches effi ciency of a lesson.

а

 



 

 

  – 



 

  а


а

  а а 


а , 

 

  а



 

а

а 



 

 



 

  а


 

.  Бi i  

  а а

а 

а



 

i i 


 а

 

а i



 

 

 – 



а

а



а

 



i

а а  e



i.

Б

  а



а 

 

 



 

  а а 


а  

 ǩ

  а а  



. ů  

а

 



 

 

 



а

 

 



а

.  Б а   «

а

»  а


 

ǩ

  а а



 

 

а  



а

а  


 

  а а 


 

. О  


   

 

 



 

  а


а 

а а


. М

 

 



 

 

 



,  ǩ

 

 



а

 

  ǩ



 а

 а



а а

 

,  ǩ



 

 



а

а а 


а а 

 

 



.  К

 

  «М



а

  а


а

а  


а

» 

  а а 



 

  а а



а

а 

 



 

а



  а

  а


а

а 



 Ф

а  ǩ  


  ǩ  

 

    а



 

. О


  а а  а

 

 



  а


! Е

 

  ǩ  



 

а а, 


 

  а


? М

а  ǩ  



 

а

а  



  а а 

 

 



а

 



 

 

а



 

а

 



а

а   ǩ  


  ǩ

- ǩ


 

а

 



. Жа а 

а а


 

а  


 

  а а  


 

 

 



 

 

  а



 

. Б


а   ǩ

  а а


а

а  


 

а

 



а

 «Б


 

а  а а


 

а



 

336

 

а



», «Ф

а  а а


 

а  


  а

 

. С



 а

 

 



а а  а

», 


«Са а  

 

 



 

а а  а а



  а

»,  «Ма а  

а а

 

а



 

а

 



,  а а - ǩ

 

а



а

». 


Ж

 

  а



а  а а

а

 



а

 

 



 

 

 а



  а а  ǩ

 

  а а а 



а

а  а а а а , 

  а а  ǩ

 

  «Д а



  а

 

» 



  « а а  

 

 



»  а а  а а

а



 

а   ǩ


-

а

 



а а

 

 



а

а

.  Д а



 

 

 



 

 

  а



 

а

 



а а 

а а


  ǩ

 

а



 

 

 а а



а

 

а



  ǩ

 

 



-

 

 



  а

а 

 



а а  

 

. « а а  



 

 

» 



 

а а а 


а

   


  а

а

а 



а а

 

 



а   а а

 

  ǩ



 

 

 



а а

а  а а  


 

а

 



.[1, 12- ]

Са а


а

а  ǩ  


  Б

 

 



 

а

а , 



а

 

 



 

 

а



а

а 

а  



 ǩ  

  а


а а  а

 

а



 

 ǩ

 



. М

а

,  а



 

  а


а 

 

  а



 а

а  «а


  а

 а а  


 

  а


», 

 

 



  а

а

 « а



а  а

 

 



а а

 

 



а

:  а


а  а, ǩ

 

 



 

«К



  а

  а  


  а а

а 

.  Б



 

  а


а  

 

-



 

Н



?», 

 

а



 

а 

 



а , 

 

 



а

а   а


а  

 



 

а   а


а «Ж

 

а



 Ш

 Ш

а



а

 

 



», «Ма а -

ǩ

 



 

а

а  а



 

а а


  а » 

 

а



а

а 

а  



-

 

а



а 

  а а  


 

а



а а а 

  а


.

О

а



 

  а


 

а  


 

а  


 

 



а

а  

  ǩ


  а

а 

а

а  

 ǩ

 



а а

  а


а а

а 

а



.[1, 40- ]

Т

 

а  а

а

а  



а

а  


а  а а а

  а



а

а 

а , 



  а а  

 

 



а

а  


 

  а а


а 

  а


а

 



 

а

.  М



а

«М



а 

 

 7 



а а  

. О


  а

  а


а ? Д

  а


  а  

 

а



М

а  



» 

 

а



а

а 

а   а



,  ǩ , 

 

 



 

  а а  



 

.

С



а

а  

 

а

  а а


 

  а а  


 

а



  а

 



 

 

а



а 

.[1, 41- ] М

а  

а

а



 «Ж

 

 



» 

 

 «



 

а

 



  а

а  


а

», «С а а

а 

  а  


а  

  а


  а

а

. Н



?»  . .  ǩ

 

а   (Н



 

  а а 


 

  а  


 

  а


а 

а   а


 

а а 


а

?), 


 (Га  

 

  а



а 

 

 



 

?) 


а

а   а


а а 

а



а

а  а

а  

а

а

а «С

а   а


а

 

 а а



  а?» 

 

а



а

 

а



а 

а



Д а

 а

 



 

а  


а

 

а  а а



а а  ǩ


 

 

  а а  



а а

 

 



а 

  а


а

а 

 



  ǩ

 

а 



 

  а


а

а  


а  

 



 

  а а  


 

 

 



а , 

 

 



 

 а



а

а  


 

а

,  а



а  а а

а 

 



« а а  


 

 

» 



  а а

  «


-

 

» 



  а а

.  О


  а

 

а



а 

 

а  



  Ж

  Б


  «

а  


» 

  а


  а

а , 


 

а

 



а

 

  а



а а

  а


а а 

 



 

а

.  Б



  а

  а


 

а

а 



а 

 

 



  а а

  а


 

 



  а

  а


 

 

ǩ  



 а

а а  а а


 а

  ǩ



 

а  а


 

 



а

.[1, 44-45- ]

 

 

 ǩ



 

 

 а



а  а

а  


 

 

  ǩ



 

  а


а а 

 

 



а

а



 

а

а  а



а а

.

Ф



а  а а

а 

а



 

 

а а 



  ǩ


. Д

  а а



а

а 

  ǩ



 

а

а 



.  М

а



 

а

а  а



 

 

  (



 

  а


  а


а

  а



  . .),  Н  

?  Н   а


а

?  О


а  

а  


337

  а


а

 

? «Ж



 

. Ж


  а а

 

»  а



а ǩ  

 

 



, «Н  

? Н


 

а ?» 


 

а

а  а



 

а

 



а а, 

 

  а а а а, 



 

а

 а



 а

а, 


 

 

  а



а

. О


   

 

 



,  а а а  а а

 



а  а


а

.  Я


  а



а а  а

  а


 

 

  а



а

О



а

а 

а



а  

а а 


-

  а а   а а а  а а

. С

 

а



  а

 

 



а

а 

а



-

а

а, 



  а

  а


а 

а  


а

  ǩ  



 

а

  а



а ,  а а

а , 


 

 

 



 

 



С

 

а  



  –ǩ  

 

а



 

  –


  а

а

а



  ǩ

 

а , 



 

 



 

 

а а 



 а

 



а  

а , 


 

а  



  а

а

. [2, 15-18- ]



С

 

а   а



 

а  


 

 

  а



 

 



 

а

 



а

 



  а

а,  а


а а

 

 



а а, 

 

а а 



ǩ

 

а



а  а

 

а



.

О

а



  а а  

а 

-



  а а а  

 

а  а а а а



,  а а

а  


  а а  

а

 



а

  а


 

а

 



 

а  а а


а

 

.



О

 

  а а а   – 



 

  а


а  

 

  а



а   а

а 

а



,  а

а  


а

а  а


 

  ǩ


  а

 

  а а  



 

 

  а



а  

 

а   ǩ



 

а

 



а

 

а а



  ǩ

 

  ǩ



 

 

.[1, 57- ]



Б

  а


а а

 

а



 

 

 



а

 

 



а

а  а а 


а а  а а

 

  а



а

. Б


 

а



  а

  а а а


 

а 

а



а  а а  

а а


а

.  О


а  

 

а а



 

ǩ

 



  а а а а  а

 

ǩ



 

а

 



а а а

 

 



 

 

а  



  а

 

.  Та



а

а   а а 


  а а 

а а


. Б

 а

а  



 

 а

 



  а а а

 

  а



а  


а

а 

 



  а

а

 



 

  а


а

 а

 а



а  а

а а а  ǩ


 

 

  а



. Б

 

а



а  

  ǩ



 

а

 ǩ



 

  а


 

.[1, 58- ]

О

а  


  а

а  


 

а

  а



а  

  а


  а а

а

а  а а а  



 

. О  


 

    а  


 

 а

  а  



 

 

 



 

 

а



-

  а а а



 

 - 


а а

-



 

 а

,  а а а  



 

 

 



 

 

 



а

.

О



а  

а  


  ǩ

 

а  



-

-



  а а а  

. О


а  

-

  а а а   а



 

 

  а



а  

 

 



 

а, 



-

  а а а  

а

  а а


 а

, ǩ


 

.

Са



 

а   а а


а  а

а а


-

а

 



а  

  а


 

а

а



 

. И


а

  а


а

 

 а



 

  а


а а а 

а



а  

  ǩ



  а

  а а а  

а

 



а

 



а а а  

а а



 

а

  а



а , 

 



 

  а


 

а

а



а

  а


 

ǩ

 



 

а

 



а

а



 

  а а а  

 Activote 

а



 

а а а


а  Р

  GLX-   а

а а

  АКТ-


  а

а

  а



 

  а а  



  а

 

а



а 

 

 



  ǩ

.  


Ф

а

 



 

 

а



 

 

 



  а

 

 



 

а а


 

  а


а

,  ǩ


 

а

 



а

а

 



  а

а, 


 

а

 



а

а

 



 

.  Ф


а

 

 



  – 

а  а а


а 

а

 



а

  а


а

 

  а



а, 

а

 



а

  а


 

  а а


 

а

а, 



а

 

а  



 

 ǩ

 



 

 

 



.[3,49- ]

АКТ-


 

а

 



 

  а


а

а

  а а



 а

а



а  

 

 



а

 



а

а, 


а

а

  а



а а

  а


а , ǩ   а

 

а  а а



.

«Ж

 



а

 

а »  а а



а 

а

 а



а 

  а


 а

а а  



 

 

  а



а а   а

а

а 



а

  а


а а 

  а


а

а 



  а

  «Б


- а

 

а »  а



 

 

а , 



а

 

  а а



а

 

  а



а

 

 а



 

 а

,  ǩ



 

 а



338

О

 



 АКТ 

а

 



 

  - ǩ


а

а



 

  а


а

АКТ 



 

а

 



а

 

,  ǩ



 

 ǩ

  а а 



 

 

 



.  О  

а

  ǩ



 

  а


а

а



 

 

а а а 



.

АКТ-


 

а  а а


а

а 

а а 



а

 



  а


а

  а


а

а, 


а

 

а   а



  а

 



  а а

а  а


 

   


 

а



 

а

а



 

а

а, 



  а а

а

  а



а

а 

а



.

Та а


  ǩ

  а


  а а а

 

а 



а

 

 



а

  а а  


  а


 

«

а   Э



» 

  а


 

 

 



 

  а


а  

  ǩ


 

а

 



а

  А а   а а



 

а а  


а  –  а

а

 



 

 

 



,  а

а

  а а  



а а

а 

 



 

  – 


а

а   а а  

 

 



 

 



Б а   а а 

 

 



  а

 

 



а

а 

.  А



  а а

 

 



  а а

 

  -



ǩ

 

  а



а а

 

 



а

. С


а  ǩ  

а

 



а

  а а   а а

а  а  

ǩ

 



а

 

  а



 

 

,  а



 

 

,  а



а а

 

  а   а



а , 

а

  а



а

а ,  а


 

а   ǩ   а

а 

  а


а 

а

  а



. М

    а а


а

а  а


  ǩ

  а а


 

а

 



 

а  


.  «Ж

 

.  Ж



  а а

 

»  а



 

 

  а



 

а

 



 

а 

  а



,  «За

 

 



 

  а


а »  а

а 

 



а

а 

. О



а   а

 

а - а



а

  а



а

,  а


 

 а

а , 



ǩ

 

 



.  а

 

а  



 

а 

а



а  ǩ

а

 



  а

а  



 

а 

. С



  а а  «Ж

 

 



»  а

а 

а



  а а , Power point 

 

 



а

а



 

а   а а


 

а , 


 

а

 



 

. Жа


 

а а  а


  ǩ

  а а


 

а

 



а

, ǩ


,  а

. С


 

а  


а  

 

 



 а

 

а



,  а а  

 

а



 

, а


а 

.

О



 

 

а



 В.А.С

: «М


  а

 

 - ǩ



 а а

  а


 

а



 

а

 



а

а



а

 

 



  а

а

а .  ů



 

 

а



а а

а   а


 

  а


  а ,  а а 

,  а


 

  – 


а

  а а


а   а

- а


 

 

а



 

 

 



 

 

» 



 

  а


  а,  а а

 

а



 

а  а


  а


  а  

а

  а



а  а

  ǩ  


а

 

.  Е



  а а

 

а а



а  а а  

  а а



 

 

 



  а а

а 

 



,

а

 



а

а

 



а

а  а - а


  а

 – 


 

  а


  а а

 

 ǩ  



а  

 

а



а

 а а . 


К

  а


 –  а а

 

  ǩ



 

а а


 

  а


. Дǩ

 а

а



а, 

 

а



 

а 

  а



а -а  


 

  а



а

а , 



  ǩ

 

а



а

 

 



  а

  а


а  ǩ

 

а



а

а  а


.  А а

а  


  а

 

а  



 

а

  ǩ



  а

а  а а  


а

 

 



а

 

а



  а

 а

а а



 

а  


  а

 

 



 

а а а


.[1,  78- ]  Б

 

а



а  а  

  а  


 

 

а



 а

а 

а



.  

Б

 



  а а

  ǩ


  а

  а а а


 

 

 



  а

а



 

 

 



 

а

  а



  а а а а

а  а


а

а   а а а

а  

а  а


 

 

.



Жа  

  а  


 

  а


а

 

а



 

а

 



а  

 

 



 

 а



а 

а

  а



а   а а

  а


. Б

 

 



а

 

 



а

 

а 



 

. М


  а а

а

а ǩ  



 

  а


а а

  а


а , 

  ǩ


 

 

 



а

 



  а а

а  а  


 а

 



а

а а 


а а 

 

а



 

а

а   а а  



а

.

Б



 

 

 



а

  а  а а


 

а

  а



а  ǩ

 

  а



 

 

а



а

 



 

  а


 

а 

а



 

 

 



 

а .  М


а  

 

 



  а

а

 



а  

. М


а

 



 

 

 ǩ



 

 

 



 

- а


а

 

а



  а а

 

. Б а ,  ǩ



 

а



  а а

 


339

а 

а



 

а

  ǩ



 

 

  а а



 

 

а



  а а

а

а  ǩ



 

 

а



. Б  

  а


а

  а


а

  ǩ


 

а

 



а  

а

 



 

а а


.[1, 88- ]

М

а



 

 ǩ

  ǩ



 а

а а


а

а

а ǩ



 

 

 



а

  а


 

.[1, 90- ] М

   ǩ

 а а


а «Ба а а . Ба а а  

», «О


 

  

 



а а а  

», «Са а  

 

 

 а



»  а

а

а 



а

а  


ǩ

 



а 

а



 

а а


а 

 



а

 

а 



 

 

а



.  

О

а



  а а ǩ

- ǩ


 

а

  а а



а

а  а а


 

а а 



а 

а  



а а

а  


 

 

а



 

а

 



.  М

 

а



  а а

а  


а

 

а  



а

 

а  



. О а   а а

а 

  а



 



а

а 

 



 

а , 


а  а

а а


 

а ,  а


а 

а

а 



 

К



  а а   а

а 

а



 

 

а



а



  а


  – 

а

а



,  ǩ

 

  а а а  а а а  



 

а а 


  – 

а

  а



а

а



,  а

 –  а


а  

 а

а 



 а а

.

Е



а

 Н. На а


а

 «Б


а а

а 

 



 

 – 



 

 

а



а

 



а

  а а   ǩ

  а а

а  


 

 

а



.  С

а  


а а 

 

  а



» 

 

а



...[4]  Б

а а


 

 

  а



 

а 

  а а



 

 

 



 

 

а а.  а



  а а  

а

   а а   а а



а  а  

 

  а а



а  а

 

а , 



а

а

 



 

 



  ǩ

 

 



  а а 


 

 

  а а 



 

 

 



а

 



а 

 

а



 

а  



 

  а а



 

а а  а


а , 

а

 



 

а   а а


 

а ,  а



а  

  а


а , 

а

а , 



а

а а 


а а  а а

 

а



 

а

 



ǩ

 

.




1   ...   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   ...   129


©emirsaba.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал