Іі халы аралы ылыми-тůжірибелік конференциясы а



жүктеу 24.47 Mb.

бет95/129
Дата15.03.2017
өлшемі24.47 Mb.
1   ...   91   92   93   94   95   96   97   98   ...   129

И

а

а  

а

а

 1. Са


 А.И.  О а

 

 



а     

. М., 2000.

 2. Е а

а Б


а  Д. Б. П

   


. — М., 1981. 

 3. В


 И.П. М

 

   



  а а

. — М., 1989. 

 4. Г

  Ю.З. В


а

а



 

. — М., 1991. 

 5. Л

 Н.С. У


 

   


а . — М., 1971. 

 6. Ма


 A. M . За а

 

а



. М.,1992.

 7. http://pedsovet.su/load/138 (26.10.2012)

 8. http://festival.1september.ru/articles/310026 (26.10.2010)

 9. http://nsportal.ru/nachalnaya-shkola/raznoe/rabota-s-odarennymi-detmi-2  (26.10.2010)

10. http://pedagogical_dictionary.academic.ru/660/В

 (29.10.2010)



THE IMPORTANCE OF PEER AND SELF-ASSESSMENT IN TEACHING AND LEARNING 

ENGLISH

Bukutova A.S.

Nazarbaev Intellectual School

Kazakhstan

А

а

а

О

 

 

 

  а а  

. О

 

 -  а а 

. Ба а а

 

  а

 

а

 ǩ

 

. С

а , 

  а а  

  а  а а 

  ǩ

 

  а

а , 

а а

 а

а 

 

  а а

. Ба а а

а 

а

 “ а

а”  ǩ  

 



 

а

  а а 

ǩ

  -

  а а 

 а

 

 а а



423

А

а

П

а а

 

а

а

 

 

а

,   

 

 

а

.  Ва

   

а

 

 

. П



а  

а

 

  а

 

 

   

  а 

а

 

. С

 

а

   

а

 «

»  а

 

  а

а

 

 

а

  а

   

а



Abstract

Teaching involves many responsibilities, one of which is assessment. The central issue in assessment is teachers’ 

objectivity and fairness of grades. Therefore, it would be appropriate to let learners share the responsibility with 

their teacher concerning the discussion of classroom work and taking students’ voice into account in evaluation 

which could be implemented into practice by means of peer and self-assessment (PSA). 

The  importance  of  peer  and  self-assessment  (PSA)  has  been  under  investigation  and  educators’  discussion 

“since  the  turn  of  the  century”  [1,  p.114]  as  a  result  of  growing  interest  in  learner  autonomy.  In  most  reports, 

PSA is recognized as less formal and consequently less threatening form of assessment in modern teaching. In 

addition, they help to increase students’ self-confi dence, motivation and promote autonomous learning because of 

the sense of involvement which students experience while assessing themselves. In Kazakhstani teaching context 

this approach to learners’ evaluation might cause misunderstanding among teachers because in a traditional system 

the teacher is a “fi gure of authority that guaranteed quality” [2, p.91].

Harris (1997) believes that self-assessment (SA) is a “pillar” [3, p.12] in terms of developing learners’ autonomy 

and self-directed language learning. According to this author, SA tends to make learners more actively involved in 

evaluation and responsible for learning by means of refl ection on their strengths and weaknesses. After identifying 

them, learners might become more aware of own success or necessity to improve and develop in learning. The 

idea of developing responsibility for learning and self-improvement seems to be new in the Kazakhstani system of 

education, where previously the emphasis tended to be more on a teacher ‘giving’ and evaluating knowledge rather 

than helping students to gain that knowledge by themselves and estimate their own progress. 

Along with SA such experts in the area as Black & William (1998) suggest considering peer assessment (PA). 

A  seemingly  strong  correlation  between  these  two  forms  can  be  explained  by  the  fact  that  after  being  able  to 

provide meaningful feedback on their own performance or after “carrying out systematic remedial learning work 

for himself” [4, p.30], students would become capable of making use of peers’ feedback and making constructive 

judgments about others’ work. These authors emphasize the signifi cance of PA in the improvement of learners’ 

collaboration and recommend incorporating it as a part of classroom learning activity. However, the anticipated 

problem with PSA might be that it demands time on the part of both teachers and students to be trained to do it 

effectively and to become a kind of a ‘habit’ in the lessons. Particularly, in the existing long-established grading 

system  of  our  country  traditionally  it  was  only  a  teacher  who  had  responsibility  and  competence  to  evaluate 

students’ work.

The research undertaken by Sivan (2000) differentiates between 2 types of peer assessment: intra group (within 

groups: group members assessing the contribution of an individual to the group work) and inter group (between 

groups: class members assessing groups’ presentations of their work) assessment [5, p.196]. This approach could 

be primarily helpful in making group projects or presentations. The second type (inter group) can be especially 

valuable  in  initial  stages  of  using  PA  in  the  classroom,  when  the  whole  group  performance  is  assessed,  for 

preventing  students’  anxiety  about  assessment.  The  intra  group  assessment  would  be  effective  for  measuring 

individual contribution to the group’s success in learning and, in this way, gaining encouragement from peers.

The  essential  effect  why  educators  are  supposed  to  implement  PSA  is  to  develop  “transferrable  skills”  [6, 

p.256],  which Topping  (1998)  refers  to  negotiation  skills,  and  diplomacy  rather  than  pure  grading  or  marking. 

These skills are of greater value due to the fact that they can make learners not just passive recipients of assessment 

outcomes  but  constructors  of  their  own  learning  and  desirable  results. Through  PSA  learners  could  be  offered 

to  develop  strong  social  skills  while  achieving  a  consensus  with  the  assessment  criteria  or  choosing  the  best 

alternatives.



424

PSA implementation strategies are likely to depend on the type of lesson or skills to be developed. In regard 

to SA in developing writing skills, Cresswell (2000) rightly emphasizes the risk of students’ ample targeting of 

grammar rules and spelling rather than focusing on “global concerns” [7, p.236] including content and organization, 

logicality, relevance of ideas and appropriateness of content to the audience. In this case the use of PSA checklists 

would be justifi ed. Coyle et al justifi cation for checklists is that they ‘make the assessment process overt’ [8, p.121] 

i.e. the teacher is sure what elements his students should concentrate on and what learning outcomes are required 

or desirable. Thus, a teacher might vary aspects which should be included in checklists ranging from grammatical 

items to structural organization of a piece of writing. 

In addition to checklists, one more important benefi t of peer response highlighted by Hyland & Hyland (2006) 

is that peers can provide “a sense of audience” [2, p.90], which tends to be “more authentic than teacher response” 

[2, p.90]. The potential audience (peers) can let writers understand a written message from the point of view of a 

reader and help to improve it, if and when necessary. 

Methodology.  Referring  back  to  my  teaching  experience  I  can  assume  that  I  have  never  implemented  this 

assessment tool in my practice. The main reason might lie in the traditionally accepted approach to assessment 

practices which involved marks ranging from “unsatisfactory” (2) to “excellent” (5). Now it remains unclear where 

and how a separating line between them can be drawn and whether those grades genuinely refl ect the nature or 

essence of the learning process.  That is why this part of my research attempted to involve students in providing 

feedback. 

The  writing  lesson  delivered  among  11  teachers  while  in  Professional  Development  Program  (PDP)  at 

Nazarbayev University in 2011-2012 aimed to discover students-teachers’ capability to give constructive judgments 

about the lessons as well as PSA effectiveness in avoiding typical mistakes in their own work and improving their 

own and peers’ performance. 

Table 1: self-assessment checklist results

           Questions

 

Learners 

Q1: 


have 


written 

all 


the 

p

aragra



p

hs

Q2: 



have 


the 

title 


and 

the 


su

b

heading 



which 

attract 


readers’

 attention

Q3: 



have 



included 

the 


most 

im

p



ortant 

information 

at 

the 


b

eginning of the main 

b

ody


Q4:The 

2

nd



 

p

art 



of 

the 


b

ody 


involves less im

p

ortant details



Q5: 

My 


article 

contains 

some 

quotes 


from 

the 


ex

p

erts 



in 

the 


area

Q6: 


have 


summarized/

written 


ab

out 


the 

future 


in 

my 


conclusion

Learner 1

5

4

3



4

3

4



Learner 2

5

5



4

1

5



1

Learner 3

3

2

4



5

5

5



Learner 4

5

3



5

3

5



4

Learner 5

5

3

4



4

5

1



Learner 6

4

5



4

4

1



4

Learner 7

3

4

4



2

4

2



Learner 8

3

5



5

3

5



3

Learner 9

3

4

4



3

1

3



Learner 10

5

5



5

5

5



5

Learner 11

5

5

5



5

5

5



425

My lesson presented a mixture of process and product approaches to teaching writing. My assumption was that 

when combined, familiarization with the product (sample article) would have made learners more aware of the 

newspaper article features and, in this way, help learners work out the criteria for future evaluation of their own 

article. On the other hand, such stages as redrafting and editing of a conventional process writing lesson seemed 

to  most  carefully  justify  the  use  of  peer  response  and  self-monitoring  because  the  goals  of  those  stages  are  to 

reconsider the original versions and with the help of peers’ evaluations try to improve them.

The material for my lesson was an authentic newspaper article “Kazakhstan zoo monkeys given wine to ‘ward 

off’ fl u” (from www.bbc.co.uk) chosen as a sample because of its’ familiar context for my learners. 

Data analysis. The learners were offered to fi ll in self-assessment checklists which consisted of 6 points and 

it implied marking their own written articles on the scale from 1(‘poor’) to 5(‘well done’) at the end of the lesson. 

Table1 represents this information.

Overall, teachers seemed to be quite fair with their marks with the exception of 2 learners (learner 10, learner 

11 in table 1). Their either “excellent” achievement at the lesson or unwillingness to be fair can be explained as 

a result of embarrassment which students might experience when they are fi rstly asked to assess their own work. 

From teaching perspective the results “can feed into future teaching” [9, p.107] that is to his future scheme of 

work because a teacher realizes what aspects his learners still need to work on. It is obvious from the same table, 

that the following lesson a teacher is likely to plan his lesson so that to cover question 4 and 6, where students 

indicated uncertainty related to writing the second part of body and conclusions of their articles. The table also 

demonstrates that almost all the learners succeeded with the fi rst 3 points connected with the number of paragraphs, 

title, subheading and the beginning of the main body. 

More  detailed  contrastive  analysis  of  points  3  and  6  in  bar  chart  below  reveals  that  the  learners  felt  more 

confi dent when writing the fi rst part of the body. They tended to be more certain about how to organize the most 

important  information  in  this  part  of  their  writing  as  none  of  them  assessed  themselves  the  lowest  marks  such 

as “1” or “2”. Only one learner, that is 9.1%, had a “3” and the rest graded the highest scores for their work. In 

relation to question 6, the overall trend is smoother in terms of a relatively even distribution of marks. The learners 

evaluated  their  own  work  in  different  ways. The  correlation  between  excellent  and  bad  performance  is  vague, 

which might mean that more corrective feedback or more practice is necessary in writing conclusions. 

From learners’ angle, checklists are a valuable source of information since they are likely to help learners to 

see their progress in the learning process and identify what are some weak zones which need being improved. In 

addition, after students become more skilled in self-evaluation, checklists would help learners avoid over-reliance 

on teachers and increase their self-awareness.

0

1



2

3

4



5

6

7



1

2

3



4

5

question 3



question 6

number of learners

marks

Bar chart 1: contrastive analysis of questions 3 and 6



426

Questionnaire results. According to the results of the questionnaire, there was only 1 person (9.1%) who had 

never experienced PSA neither as a learner nor as a teacher. 36.4% of the respondents confi rmed they had used 

PSA both in their teaching practice as well as being learners. A slightly more than a half of the group (54.6%) had 

different answers: 18.2% tried PSA as learners but not in their teaching while 36.4% of teachers indicated that they 

use PSA in the classroom. 

Generally, regarding learners’ fairness and ability to pinpoint their own strong points and fl aws, approximately 

a quarter of teachers (27.3%) were optimistic about this capacity with the rest 72.8% teachers’ negative responds 

or uncertainty about their ability to be fair.  However, the same amount (72.8%) of teachers responded positively to 

the question which was about their peers’ fairness at this particular lesson in identifying weak points after writing 

the newspaper article. This might have happened because the participants of my lesson were teachers and they are 

trained to provide feedback for their own learners. While in real classroom students might experience diffi culties 

when assessing their peers for the fi rst time. They would likely need time and skills to get used to the idea of being 

an assessor of their peers’ work.

There  were  some  pessimistic  reactions  to  the  question  about  how  seriously  they  accept  their  peers’  marks.  

27.3%  of  participants  didn’t  take  it  truly  because  either  “they  (peers)  are  not  teachers”  or  students  “take  into 

account only (my) instructor’s words”.  There was also an opinion that “they (peers) are not confi dent (competent

enough in the area we are learning”. 

As for some supportive views on PSA several learners really believed they became more aware about their 

weak  points  –  ‘help  me  to  improve/evaluate’,  ‘I  need  to  work  on  them’,  they  (peers)  are  better  at  seeing  my 

mistakes’, ‘it helps to improve myself’, ‘when peers tell about your mistakes it is easier to understand’.

Despite the teachers’ previous doubts concerning students’ abilities to self-assess their performance, 45.5% of 

teachers agreed on the necessity to use similar techniques with their learners and 54.6% expressed their interest to 

PSA and were inclined to try it in their classrooms. None of them rejected the need to implement these techniques 

in their own teaching practice. The main reasons were “involving them (learners) into a learning process”, making 

students “feel free and comfortable”, building “some confi dence”, making students “aware of their own strengths 

and weaknesses”, being “autonomous and responsible” and “fi nding out how the students and teacher succeeded”. 

So, the presented results reveal that after experiencing PSA as learners, the participants favorably reconsidered 

their attitude towards PSA as teachers.

To sum up, the crucial points of PSA in language learning and teaching are learners’ refl ection, critical evaluation 

of their own performance, developing learners’ autonomy, increasing responsibility for learning. It is obvious that 

PSA is a new phenomenon for Kazakhstani pupils and teachers. Moreover, in the light of our country’s schooling 

reforms  in  recent  years,  shifts  in  assessment  practices  might  signifi cantly  affect  current  teaching  and  learning 

experiences. 

Reference

1. Bullock, D. (2011).  Learner self-assessment: an investigation into teachers’ beliefs. ELT J, 65 (2), 114-125. 

doi: 10.1093/elt/ccq041.

2. Hyland,K., & Hyland,F. (2006). Feedback on second language students’ writing. Language Teaching, 39(02), 

83-101. doi: 10.1017/S0261444806003399

3. Harris, M. (1997). Self-assessment of language learning in formal seƫ



  ngs. 

ELT J, 51, 12 - 20.

4. Black, P., & William, D. (1998). Assessment and classroom learning. Assessment in education, 5(1), 7- 74. 

Retrieved from ProQuest

5.  Sivan,  A.  (2000).  The  implementation  of  peer  assessment:  an  action  research  approach.  Assessment  in 



education, 7(2), 193-286. Retrieved from ProQuest

6. Topping, K. (1998).  Peer assessment between students in colleges and universities. Review of Educational 



Research, 68(3), 249-276. Retrieved from ProQuest

7. Cresswell, A. (2000). Self-monitoring in student writing: developing learner responsibility. ELT J, 54, 235-

244.


427

8.  Coyle,  D.,  Hood,  P.,  &  Marsh,  D.  (2010).  Content  and  language  integrated  learning.  Cambridge,  UK: 

Cambridge University Press.

9. Spratt, M., Pulverness, A., & Williams, M. (2011). The TKT Course. Modules 1, 2 and 3. Cambridge, UK: 

Cambridge University Press. Jackson, P. “Kazakhstan zoo monkeys given wine to ‘ward off fl u” -http: // www.

bbc.co.uk 



(2012, February 3).

ОТ ПЕДАГОГИЧЕСКОЙ ПРАКТИКИ -

К ПЕДАГОГИЧЕСКОМУ ИССЛЕДОВАНИЮ

Ва

а И.Н.

А

а

а  

а

,  . Та

а

На а

а  И

а

а  

а

 

- а

а

  а

а

Р

а Ка а

а

А

а а

ů

 

 

 

а,  а а а

 

 

а

а

а 

а

 

а

 

  ǩ

 

  а

 

 

а

а

.  Ма а а а 

  « а а

а

 

 

а

  а а

а

 

а

 

а

а а  ǩ

 

 

а

 

 

» 

Ба а

а а

 

а 

  а

а 

а

 

а

а 

 

а

а  

 

.


1   ...   91   92   93   94   95   96   97   98   ...   129


©emirsaba.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал