Н. П. Пешкова (зам отв редактора)



жүктеу 2.68 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
бет1/31
Дата15.03.2017
өлшемі2.68 Mb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   31

МИНИСТЕРСТВО ОБРАЗОВАНИЯ И НАУКИ РФ 
ФЕДЕРАЛЬНОЕ ГОСУДАРСТВЕННОЕ БЮДЖЕТНОЕ ОБРАЗОВАТЕЛЬНОЕ  
УЧРЕЖДЕНИЕ ВЫСШЕГО ПРОФЕССИОНАЛЬНОГО ОБРАЗОВАНИЯ  
БАШКИРСКИЙ ГОСУДАРСТВЕННЫЙ УНИВЕРСИТЕТ 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
КОГНИТИВНЫЙ И КОММУНИКАТИВНЫЙ  
АСПЕКТЫ ДИСКУРСИВНОЙ ДЕЯТЕЛЬНОСТИ 
 
 
Материалы Международной 
научно-практической конференции 
11-12 декабря 2012 г. 
 
Том 1 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Уфа 
2012 


 
УДК 802/809.1-52 
ББК 81.2 
 
 
 
Издание осуществлено при финансовой поддержке Националь-
ного фонда подготовки кадров, грант № 14.B37.21.1000 
 
 
 
Редакционная коллегия: 
доктор филол.наук, проф. Ф.Г. Фаткуллина (отв. редактор) 
доктор филол.наук, проф. Н.П. Пешкова (зам.отв. редактора) 
доктор филол.наук, проф. А.Р. Мухтаруллина 
доктор филол.наук, проф. Л.А. Калимуллина 
канд.филол.наук, доцент Р.А. Салахов  
канд.филол.наук Б.В. Орехов 
технические секретари: А.Р. Ахметзянова  
                                        Р.М. Гайбадуллин 
                                        И.Р. Саитбатталов  
 
 
 
 
 
         
Когнитивный и коммуникативный аспекты дискурсивной дея-
тельности:  Материалы  Международной  научно-практической  кон-
ференции  11-12  декабря  2012.,  Том  1.,  г.Уфа  /  отв.ред. 
Ф.Г.Фаткуллина. - Уфа, 2012. – 348 с. 
 
УДК 802/809.1-52 
ББК 81.2 
 
 
© Коллектив авторов, 2012 г. 


 
УДК 378‘02 
DR. PARIKSHAT SINGH MANHAS 
University of Jammu, J&K, India 
 
Brand Building through Quality Service in Higher Education:  
A Case study of Tourism and Hospitality Education in India 
 
I.
 
 Introduction and Rationale of the study 
With  the  time  advent,  academic  activities  and  research  collaborations  are 
increased on the global level. According to Altbach & Knight (2007), the interna-
tional activities of universities dramatically expanded in volume, scope and com-
plexity during the past two decades. These activities range from traditional study-
abroad programs to upgrading the international perspectives and skills of students, 
enhancing foreign language programs and providing cross-cultural understanding.  
There  is  increasing  demand  not  only  for  hospitality-related  businesses 
themselves but also for services providing education and training to meet the de-
mands of the tourism industry for human resources (United Nations World Tour-
ism  Organization,  2010).  Furthermore,  the  study  by  Kuo,  Chang  &  Lai  (2011) 
focused on the point that the overall development of the industry with its multip-
licity of structures, the hospitality and tourism industry needs to provide relevant 
higher education programmes.  
This is further suggested by the studies of Bosselman (1996) and Wilson et 
al. (1997) that the growth in tourism programs has created high expectations with-
in the tourism and travel industry that higher-quality educational programme will 
emerge to match the industry‘s structural changes and increases in consumer de-
mand. It has also brought about an increase in the quality of teaching in tourism 
majors.  Thus,  as  suggested  by  Horng  et  al.  (2009),  the  need  to  evaluate  HTLPs 
(hospitality, tourism and leisure related programmes) accurately has become ever 
more important.  
Therefore, Kuo, Chang & Lai (2011) concluded that HTLPs should design 
to  meet  the  expectations  and  requirements  of  the  tourism  industry  and  it  should 
include the highest level of quality to train specialist personnel. Hence, improving 
service quality and increasing customer satisfaction are the main focus in HTLPs.  
The term ―Quality‖ in an educational context as explained by Tan & Kek 
(2004) should depends on whether the education provided meets students‘ actual 
needs and expectations. Henceforth, Heck & Johnsrud (2000) studied that in these 
terms,  higher  education  is  facing  pressure  globally  to  improve  the  quality  of  the 
educational  services  provided.  Consumers  value  most  of  those  service  providers 
who can provide the highest level of quality. This is true in both profit and non-
profit service industries.  
The significance of the term  ―Service Quality‖ and its related dimensions 
has  already  proved  the  subject  of  interest  for  many  service  marketers  as  well  as 


 
researchers.  However,  only  a  few  studies  (e.g.  Dabholkar,  Shepherd  &  Thorpe, 
2000; Gounaris et al., 2003) have focused attention on the antecedents to service 
quality in the context of commercial service sectors.  
―Service Quality‖ research in higher education sector is new, at least, com-
pared  to  that  of  commercial  sector.  The  current  literature  on  service  quality  in 
higher education context attempted to measure functional performances of educa-
tional  services  in  Indian  Context.  A  review  of  several  research  studies,  since 
1960s to the present scenario were showed that the dimensions of service quality 
in higher education context varied widely (Abdullah 2005, 2006a, 2006b, 2006c; 
Angell, Heffernan & Megicks 2008; Gatfield, Barker & Graham 1999; Joseph & 
Joseph  1997;  Kwan  &  Ng,  1999;  Li  &  Kaye,  1998;  LeBlanc  &  Nguyen,  1997; 
Rojas-Me´ndez  et  al.  2009;  Sultan  &  Wong,  2010;  Stodnick  &  Rogers,  2008; 
Smith, Smith & Clarke, 2007). Moreover, close listening to students is necessary 
in  order  to  understand  their  views  and  to  achieve  the  educational  success  that 
brings  competitive  advantage  in  tourism  education.  Thus,  the  present  study  was 
identified the critical educational elements of HTLPs and then boost student satis-
faction by making targeted improvements. 
II.
 
Objectives of the Study 
The  main  objective  of  the  research  study  was  to  identify  and  analyze  the 
antecedents  of  service  quality  that  relevant  in  context  of  tourism  and  hospitality 
education according to the Indian scenario. 
III.
 
Review of Literature  
The review of literature has been divided into the  main  keywords studied 
in this paper as explained below:  
i.
 
Service Quality 
The term ―Service Quality‖ was well explained by Dyson et al., (1996) and 
according to them the service quality is so called the better and standardized out-
put delivered by a service. 
The  several  definitions  were  given  by  the  researchers  which  majorly  fo-
cused on described the various traits involved in service quality and service deli-
very. The service quality, basically, linked with the expectations of the customers 
as  concluded  by  Parasuraman,  Zeithaml  &  Berry  (1985).  Furthermore,  Sasser, 
Olsen  & Wyckoff (1978) given the broad justifications of  the concept of service 
quality and Gronroos (1991) focused on three dimensions viz. technical, function-
al and company image related to service quality. While the other researchers de-
scribed several dimensions which impact the delivery and maintenance of service 
quality  during  service  encounters  vis-à-vis  with  the  customers  (Lehtinen,  1982; 
Johnson et al., 1990; Dabholkar, 2000). 
There were various tools used to measure and analyzed the service quality 
and delivery but majorly two instruments SERVQUAL (Parasuraman, Zeithaml & 
Berry, 1990) and SERVPREF (Cronin & Taylor, 1992, 1994) were effectively 
contributed in knowing the actual impact of service quality. 


 
ii.
 
Service Quality in Higher Education 
The role and contribution of Service Quality even in Higher Education has 
shown its impact especially from the last two decades. Some researches  focused 
on dimensions of service quality in higher education context which varies widely 
across country, institution and culture (Abdullah 2005, 2006a, 2006b, 2006c; An-
gell,  Heffernan  &  Megicks,  2008;  Gatfield,  Barker  &  Graham,  1999;  Joseph  & 
Joseph,  1997;  Kwan  &  Ng,  1999;  Li  &  Kaye,  1998;  LeBlanc  &  Nguyen,  1997; 
Rojas-Me´ndez  et  al.,  2009;  Sultan  &  Wong,  2010;  Stodnick  &  Rogers,  2008; 
Smith,  Smith  &  Clarke,  2007)  while  Gounaris  et  al.  (2003)  and  Kangis  &  Passa 
(1997)  concluded  that  customers'  perception  of  service  quality  are  affected  by 
several  factors  like  communications  from  salespeople,  social  referrals,  various 
types  of  information  collected  &  credence  consumers  develop  towards  a  service 
organization. While one study majorly focused on service quality in higher educa-
tion like Gatfield et al. (1999) developed 26 attributes comes under four aspects / 
dimensions viz. Academic Instructions, Campus Life, Recognition and Guidance.  
Moreover,  Hill  (1995)  focused  on  student‘s  expectations  because  student 
as a primary customer of higher education services should focus on expectations 
from the academic institutions. Even, Waugh (2002) also viewing student as cus-
tomer created some tensions in universities by making universities seem to be too 
aligned with businesses. 
According to Jain et al. (2011) that in a pursuit of excellence, it is increa-
singly  important  to  identify  customer  values  and  demands  and  therefore,  service 
quality  has  been  identified  as  one  such  demand.  And  their  study  concluded  that 
service quality in a higher education consists of two primary dimensions like pro-
gram  quality  which  includes  curriculum,  industry  interaction,  input  quality,  aca-
demic  facilities  and  quality  of  life  which  includes  non-academic  processes,  sup-
port facilities, campus and interaction quality. 
iii.
 
Indian scenario of Service Quality in Higher Education 
Approximately from the last two decades the scenario of higher education 
in  India  is  completely  shifted  to  positive  side.  The  one  most  prominent  factor  is 
the enrollment for higher education and hence it becomes one of the largest sys-
tems of its kind in the world.  
The  literature  review  of  the  studies  on  Indian  higher  education  presented 
the actual scenario. Like Krishnan (2011) highlighted that the Indian higher edu-
cation system has been grappling with several problems like funds crunch, equity, 
reorientation  of  programmes,  ethics,  value  associated  to  delivering  education, 
teaching  learning  process,  assessment  and  accreditation  of  institutions,  academic 
standards of the students, quality of research, innovativeness and creativity. Such 
factors directly or indirectly affect the student‘s academic productivity in the edu-
cational institutions. 
While Chakka & Kulkarni (2010) stress on improvement of teaching quali-
ty  and  learning  processes  through  total  quality  management  and  propose  a  new 


 
concept  of  ‗teacher-accreditation‘,  which  may  be  more  important  over  the  other 
accreditations.  Moreover,  Sahney  et  al.  (2006)  attempted  to  find  the  students 
perspective of quality on select educational institutions. 
Also  Pandi  et  al.  (2009)  focuses  on  integrated  management  practices  in 
educational  institutions  and  institutions  effectiveness  through  student‘s  percep-
tions  of  quality.  Altbach  (2005)  argues  that  there  are  a  small  number  of  high 
quality  institutions,  departments  and  centres  that  can  form  the  basis  of  quality 
sector in higher education. 
Kaul (2006) argues that India should have a proactive demand based policy 
for private higher education including foreign universities and institutes desirous 
of setting institutes in India or having joint ventures combined  with a regulatory 
mechanism  so  that  the  interests  and  the  welfare  of  the  students  are  not  compro-
mised. 
In such one example related to the improvement of higher education, Mi-
shra  (2011)  reports  that  in  the  Indian  state  of  Bihar,  for  increasing  the  gross 
enrolment ratio in  higher education  from the existing 12.4% to at least 20% and 
also  enhancing  the  quality  of  higher  education  to  attract  talented  boys  and  girls, 
the  state  government  has  been  contemplating  to  create  centers  of  excellence  in 
different parts of the state.  
IV.
 
Result and Discussion 
The major gap was identified through extensive literature review in terms 
of students‘ expectations from administration set-up rather teaching quality. The 
several  researches  on  service  quality  in  higher  education  emphasized  academic 
more than administration, concentrating on effective course delivery mechanisms 
and the quality of courses and teaching (Athiyaman, 1997; Bourner, 1998; Cheng 
&  Tam,  1997;  McElwee  &  Redman,  1993;  Palihawadana,  1996;  Soutar  & 
McNeil, 1996; Varey, 1993; Yorke, 1992).  
The  administration  services  of  educational  institutions  are  also  important 
like  the  academic  activities.  According  to  Anderson  (1995)  and  Salem  (1969), 
there are many reasons for focusing the administrative service quality in a univer-
sity which is the first exposure of the student to the university is through the  ad-
mission and registrar‘s services so providing high quality service to students con-
tributes to the positive assessment of the university. Moreover, compared with the 
academic units, the administrative departments of the university, such as the regis-
tration office, financial office or library, are more likely to be a replication of the 
bureaucratic  units  of  governmental  or  public  institutions.  Therefore,  Spencer 
(1991)  focused  on  the  fact  that  during  registration  in  the  Western  universities, 
they has rapidly adopted the banking touch-tone telephone systems while the uni-
versities in developing countries attempt to struggle with bureaucracies and inef-
ficient  infrastructure,  hence,  registration  remains  tied  to  a  traditional  manual 
process.  
The  review  of  literature  also  finds  a  research  gap  to  examine  the  antece-


 
dents of service quality in higher education context. There is a need to give prefe-
rence to service quality in higher education which emphasized on academic more 
than  administration,  concentrating  on  effective  course  delivery  mechanisms  and 
the quality of courses and teaching.  
V.
 
Items and Dimensions of Higher Education 
Based on the review of literature and discussion with the industry experts, 
following framework was designed as shown in Table 1: 
 
Table 1: Dimensions with their respective Items 
Dimension I: Academic 
Instructions  
Subjective Knowledge of the Faculty 
Personality Development Classes 
Placement Services 
Practical Exposure 
Dimension II: 
Administration Services  
Behaviour of the Staff 
Timely availability of the information 
Dimension III: Learning 
Atmosphere 
Library Resources 
Availability of technological tools 
Classroom interactions 
Level of organizing Seminars and Workshops 
Dimension IV: Campus Life 
Extra-curriculum activities 
Dimension V: Recognition 
& Guidance 
Guidance Cell 
Recognition of the Campuses / Courses 
 
VI.
 
Summary  
More  than  hundred  research  papers  and  its  related  literature  were  tho-
roughly  studied  and  interviewed  the  experts  and  academician  for  identified  the 
elements  that  are  valid  in  Indian  scenario.  The  major  benefit  of  this  regress 
process was to identify the prospective research gaps in higher education in terms 
of quality services, as mentioned in the section of Indian scenario of service quali-
ty  in  higher  education.  In  the  study,  secondary  data  was  analyzed  and  based  on 
that the probable antecedents were identified and then these were tested according 
to  Indian  scenario.  These  dimensions  will  help  and  guide  the  next  phase  of  the 
study  when  these  will  be  empirically  tested  and  hence  more  generalized  sugges-
tion will be framed for future references. 
VII.
 
Conclusion 
Based on the interview and qualitative study, the impact of various dimen-


 
sions  especially  in  the  context  of  educational  institutions  contributes  in  creating, 
setting and monitoring the all important practices of service quality. In the present 
time, where the hunt for excellence is on, the overall role of maintaining the ser-
vice  quality  can  easily  bring  the  competitive  benefits  for  the  educational  institu-
tions.  
Moreover, the service quality has positively contributes in marketing arena 
while  in  the  educational  institutions  and  especially  those  where  the  professional 
courses of tourism and hospitality are running; this study will presents a new pa-
radigm.  As  proved  time  and  again,  the  professional  courses  having  relevance  in 
industrial perspective, therefore, to maintain and upgrade the latest techniques are 
must,  first  to  attract  the  talent  and  then  trained  them  according  to  industry  re-
quirements.  
For that purpose, every activity and key areas should be given utmost im-
portance right from academic coursework to administration services, from library 
resources to pleasant campus life. The recognition of the universities, educational 
institutions  and  the  courses  runs  in  it  is  as  important  to  attract  the  talent  as  the 
other  key-areas  of  academic  and  administration  services.  Hence,  the  qualified 
faculty is as important as providing the quality in the services during the tenure of 
various professional courses.  
Therefore,  there  is  a  need  to  analyze  the  present  practices  and  then  mod-
ified  accordingly  to  provide  the  desired  service  quality  to  the  students  who  are 
studying the professional courses in the educational institutions. 
VIII.
 
Limitations and Areas for Future Study 
Now,  the  present  study  is  in  first  stage  while  the  next  stage  of  the  study 
will empirically test the dimension and antecedents of service quality in the edu-
cation sector especially in the tourism and hospitality sector.  
Moreover, like every research study, the present study  was  also has some 
limitations. First such limitation  was time constraint because of the less time  for 
data collection. The future researchers  might perform this  study  in by  increasing 
the sample size.  
The major benefit from that process to collect and analyze the information 
or responses from the students related to service quality in various phases of their 
course. Accordingly, the educational institutions will plan to re-define the practic-
es  of  service  quality  in  their  respective  educational  institutions.  The  next  con-
straint is limited financial resources which resulted to limit the study within Jam-
mu City. Future researchers can take the above mentioned points in their study. 
References 
1.
 
Abdullah, F. (2005). HEdPERF versus SERVPERF: The quest  for ideal mea-
suring instrument of service quality in higher education sector. Quality Assurance 
in Education, 13(4), 305-328.  
2.
 
Abdullah,  F.  (2006a).  Measuring  service  quality  in  higher  education:  HEd-
PERF versus SERVPERF. Marketing Intelligence and Planning, 24(1), 31-47.  


 
3.
 
Abdullah,  F.  (2006b).  Measuring  service  quality  in  higher  education:  three 
instruments  compared.  International  Journal  of  Research  and  Method  in 
Education, 29(1), 71-89.  
4.
 
Abdullah,  F.  (2006c).  The  development  of  HEdPERF:  a  new  measuring  in-
strument  of  service  quality  for  the  higher  education  sector.  International  Journal 
of Consumer Studies, 30(6), 569-581. 
5.
 
Altbach, P. G. (2005). Higher education in India. Retrieved on September 31, 
2012 from 
http://www.hinduonnet.com/2005/04/12/stories/2005041204141000.htm
 
6.
 
Altbach, Philip G. & Knight, Jane. (2007). The Internationalization of Higher 
Education:  Motivations  and  Realities.  Journal  of  studies  in  international 
education, 11(3/4), 290-305. DOI: 10.1177/1028315307303542 
7.
 
Anderson, E. A. (1995). Measuring service quality at a university health clin-
ic. International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, 8(2), 32-37. 
8.
 
Angell, R. J., Heffernan, T. W. & Megicks, P. (2008). Service quality in post-
graduate education. Quality Assurance in Education, 16(3), 236-254. 
9.
 
Athiyaman, A. (1997). Linking student satisfaction and service quality percep-
tions:  the  case  of  university  education.  European  Journal  of  Marketing,  31(7), 
528-540. 
10.
 
Bosselman,  R.  H.  (1996).  Current  perceptions  of  hospitality  accreditation. 
FIU Hospitality Review, Fall, 77-84. 
11.
 
Bourner, T. (1998). More knowledge, new knowledge: the impact on educa-
tion and training. Education and Training, 40(1), 11-14. 
12.
 
Chakka,R., & Kulkarni, G. T. (2010). Total Quality Management in Pedago-
gy: An Update. Indian Journal of Pharm. Educ. Res., 44(4), Oct - Dec, 2010. 
13.
 
Cheng, Y.  C.  & Tam, W. M. (1997). Multi-models of quality in education. 
Quality Assurance in Education, 5(1), 22-32. 
14.
 
Cronin,  J.  J.  Jr.  &  Taylor,  S.  A.  (1992).  Measuring  service  quality:  a  reex-
ami-nation and extension. Journal of Marketing, 56(July), 55-68. 
15.
 
Cronin,  J.  J.  Jr.  &  Taylor,  S.  A.  (1994).  SERVPERF  versus  SERVQUAL: 
reconciling  performance-based  and  perceptions  -  minus  expectations  measure-
ment of service quality. Journal of Marketing, 58(July), 125-31. 
16.
 
Dabholkar, P. A., Shepherd, C. D. & Thorpe, D. I. (2000). A comprehensive 
framework  for  service  quality:  an  investigation  of  critical  conceptual  and  mea-
surement  issues  through  a  longitudinal  study.  Journal  of  Retailing,  76(2),  139-
173.  
17.
 
Dyson,  P.,  Farr,  A.  &  Hollis,  N.S.  (1996).  Understanding,  measuring,  and 
using brand equity.Journal of Advertising Research, 36(6), 9-21. 
18.
 
Gatfield,  T.,  Barker,  M.  &  Graham,  P.  (1999).  Measuring  student  quality 
variables and the implications for management practices in higher education insti-
tutions:  an  Australian  and  international  student  perspective.  Journal  of  Higher 
Education Policy and Management, 21(2), 239-252. 
19.
 
Gounaris, S., Stathakopoulos, V. & Athanassopoulos, A. D. (2003).  Antece-

10 
 
dents  to  perceived  service  quality:  an  exploratory  study  in  the  banking  industry. 
International Journal of Bank Marketing, 21(4), 168-190. 
20.
 
Gronroos,  C.  (1991).  Strategic  Management  and  Marketing  in  the  Service 
Sector. Student litteratur Chartwell-Bratt, Sweden. 
21.
 
Heck, R. H. & Johnsrud, L. K. (2000). Administrative effectiveness in high-
er  education:  Improving  assessment  procedures.  Res.  Higher  Education,  41(6): 
663-685. 
22.
 
Hill, F. M. (1995). Managing service quality in higher education: the role of 
the student as primary consumer. Quality assurance in Education, 3(3), 10-21. 
23.
 
Horng, J. S., Teng, C. C. & Baum, T. (2009). Evaluating the quality of un-
dergraduate  hospitality,  tourism  and  leisure  programmes.  Journal  of  Hospitality, 
Leisure, Sport and Tourism Education, 8(1), 37-54. 
24.
 
Jain, Rajani., Sinha,  Gautam. & Sahney, Sangeeta. (2011). Conceptualizing 
service  quality  in  higher  education.  Asian  Journal  on  Quality,  12(3),  296-314. 
DOI: 10.1108/15982681111187128   
25.
 
Johnson, R., Silvestro, R., Fitzgerald, L. & Voss, C. (1990). Developing the 
determinants  of  service  quality.  Lehtinen,  U.,  Lehtinen,  J.R., Two  approaches  to 
service  quality  dimensions.  The  Service  Industries  Journal,  11(July,  1991),  287-
303. 
26.
 
Joseph,  M.  &  Joseph,  B.  (1997).  Service  quality  in  education:  a  student 
perspective. Quality Assurance in Education, 5(1), 15-19. 
27.
 
Kangis,  P.  &  Passa,  V.  (1997).  Awareness  of  service  charges  and  its  influ-
ence  on  customer  expectations  and  perceptions  of  quality  in  banking.  Journal  of 
Services Marketing, 11(2), 105-117. 
28.
 
Krishnan,  Archana.  (2011).  Quality  in  higher  education:  Road  to  competi-
tiveness for Indian business schools. Opinion, 1(1), 9-15.   
29.
 
Kuo,  Nien-Te.,  Chang,  Kuo-Chien.  &  Lai,  Chia-Hui.  (2011).  Identifying 
critical  service  quality  attributes  for  higher  education  in  hospitality  and  tourism: 
Applications  of  the  Kano  model  and  importance-performance  analysis  (IPA). 
African  Journal  of  Business  Management,  5(30),  12016-12024.  DOI: 
10.5897/AJBM11.1078  
30.
 
Kwan, P. Y. K. & Ng, P. W. K. (1999).  Quality indicators in higher educa-
tion: Comparing Hong Kong and China‘s students. Managerial Auditing Journal, 
14, 20-27. 
31.
 
LeBlanc, G. & Nguyen, N. (1997). Searching for excellence in business edu-
cation:  An  exploratory  study  of  customer  impressions  of  service  quality. 
International Journal of Educational Management, 11(2), 72-79. 
32.
 
Lehtinen, G. a. L., O. (1982). Service quality: a study of quality dimensions 
in Helsinki. Lewis, B.R. (1993). Service Quality measurement. Marketing Intelli-
gence and Planning, 11(4), 4-12. 
33.
 
Li, R. Y. & Kaye, M. (1998). A case study for comparing two service quality 
measurement approaches in the context of teaching in higher education. Quality in 

11 
 
Higher Education, 4(2), 103-113. 
34.
 
McElwee, G. & Redman, T. (1993). Upward appraisal in practice: an illustr-
ative  example  using  the  QUALED  scale.  Education  and  Training,  35(2)  Decem-
ber,  27-31.  Ministry  of  University  Affairs  (MUA)  of  Thailand  Annual  report 
(2002). 
35.
 
Mishra,B.K.(2011),Move to turn 50 colleges into centres of excellence. Re-
trieved 
on  September  30,  2012  from  http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/patna/Move-
to-turn-50-colleges-into-centres-of-excellence/articleshow/8625867.cms
 
36.
 
Palihawadana,  D.  (1996).  Modeling  student  evaluation  in  marketing  educa-
tion, Proceedings of the 1996 Annual Marketing Education Group Conference. 
37.
 
Pandi, P., Rao, U. S. & Jeyatilagar, D. (2009). A Study on Integrated Total 
Quality  Management  Practices  in  Technical  Institutions  -  Students‘  Perspective. 
International Journal of Educational Administration, 1(1), 17-30. 
38.
 
Parasuraman,  A.,  Zeithaml,  V.  &  Berry,  L.  L.  (1990).  Delivering  Quality 
Service: Balancing Customer Perceptions and Expectations. The Free Press, New 
York. 
39.
 
Parasuraman, A., Zeithaml, V. A. & Berry, L. L. (1985). A conceptual mod-
el of service quality and its implications for future research. Journal of Marketing, 
49(Autumn), 41-50. 
40.
 
Rojas-Me´ndez,  JI.,  Vasquez-Parraga,  A.  Z.,  Kara,  A.  &  Cerda-Urrutia,  A. 
(2009). Determinants of student loyalty in higher education: A tested relationship 
approach in Latin America. Latin American Business Review, 10, 21-39. 
41.
 
Sahney,  S.,  Banwet  D.  K.  &  Karunes,  S.  (2006).  An  integrated  framework 
for  quality  in  education:  Application  of  quality  function  deployment,interpretive 
structured modelling and path analysis. Total qulity management, 17(2), 265-285. 
42.
 
Salem, E. (1969). The Lebanese administration, in cultural resources in Leb-
anon, Crossroads to Culture, Librairie Du Liban, Beirut. 
43.
 
Kaul, Sanat. (2006). Higher education in India: seizing the opportunity. Re-
trieved on September 30, 2012 from http://www.icrier.org/pdf/WP_179.pdf 
44.
 
Sasser, W. E., Olsen, R. P. & Wyckoff, D. D. (1978). Management of Ser-
vice Operations, Allyn & Bacon, Boston, MA. 
45.
 
Smith, G., Smith, A. & Clarke, A. (2007). Evaluating service quality in uni-
versities:  a  service  department  perspective.  Quality  Assurance  in  Education, 
15(3), 334-351. 
46.
 
Soutar, G, & McNeil, M. (1996). Measuring service quality in a tertiary in-
stitution. Journal of Education Administration, 34(1), 72-82. 
47.
 
Spencer, R. (1991). After the registration revolution. College and University, 
66(4), 209-212. 
48.
 
Stodnick, M. & Rogers, P. (2008). Using SERVQUAL to measure the quali-
ty  of  the  classroom  experience.  Decision  Sciences  Journal  of  Innovative 
Education, 6(1), 115-133. 
49.
 
Sultan, P. & Wong, H. (2010). Performance-based service quality model: an 

12 
 
empirical study on Japanese  universities. Quality  Assurance in Education, 18(2), 
126-143. 
50.
 
Tan, K. C.  &  Kek,  S. W. (2004).  Service quality  in higher education using 
an enhanced SERVQUAL approach. Quality Higher Education, 10(1): 17-24. 
51.
 
United  Nation  World  Tourism  Organization  (UNWTO).  (2010).  TedQual. 
Certification  System-Executive  Introduction.  Retrieved  on  Mar.  3,  2012,  from 
http://world-tourism.org 
52.
 
Varey,  R.  (1993).  The  course  for  higher  education.  Managing  Service 
Quality, 45-49. 
53.
 
Waugh, R. F. (2002). Academic staff perceptions of administrative quality at 
universities. Journal of Educational Administration, 40(2), 172-188. 
54.
 
Wilson, K., Lizzio, A.  & Ramsden, P. (1997). The development,  validation 
and  application  of  the  Course  Experience  Questionnaire.  Studies  Higher 
Education, 22, 33–53. 
55.
 
Yorke, M. (1992). Quality in higher education: a conceptualisation and some 
observations  on  the  implementation  of  a  sectoral  quality  system.  Journal  for 
Higher Education, 16(2). 
© 
DR.
 
PARIKSHAT
 
SINGH
 
MANHAS
., 2012 
 
 
УДК 808.2 

Каталог: Books
Books -> Мақалалар, баяндамалар жинағы
Books -> 1 Бес томдық шығармалар жинағы Телжан Шонан лы Оқу құралдары, оқулықтар
Books -> Ғылым комитеті М. О. Әуезов атындағы Әдебиет және өнер институты Сейіт Қасқабасов
Books -> Ббк 83. 3 (5 Қаз) 82 Қазақстан Республикасының Мәдениет және ақпарат министрлігі Ақпарат және мұрағат комитеті «Әдебиеттің әлеуметтік маңызды түрлерін басып шығару»
Books -> Бағдарламасы бойынша шығарылып отыр Редакция алқасы
Books -> Құл-Мұхаммед М., төраға
Books -> Ербол шаймерден°лы шы армалары бесінші том


Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   31


©emirsaba.org 2019
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

    Басты бет