Минисетрство образования и науки кыргызской республики и. Арабаев атындагы кыргыз мамлекеттик университети



жүктеу 5.01 Kb.

бет18/29
Дата15.03.2017
өлшемі5.01 Kb.
1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   29

65. Zeugma ("yoke") - use of a word in the same grammatical relation to two apparent words in the context, 
one metaphorical and the other literal in sense. 
"Either you or your head must be of." (L. Carroll) 
"Juan was a bachelor of arts, and parts, and hearts." (G. Byron) 
 
Bibliography 
1.
 
Арнольд,  И.В.  Стилистика.  Современный  английский  язык:  Учебник  для  вузов  /  И.В.  Ар-
нольд. – 4-е изд., испр. и доп. — М: Б.и., 2002 .— 384 с. 
2.
 
Гальперин, И.Р. Стилистика английского языка. Учебник./И.Р. Гальперин.- Изд. 2-е, испр. и 
доп.- М., «Высш. школа», 1977.-332 с. 
3.
 
Judith Kay, Rosemary Gelshenen. Discovering Fiction, vv.1,2. Cambridge University Press, 2005. 
4.
 
Ronald Carter, A. Goddard, D. Reah, K. Sanger, and M. Bowring. Working with Texts: A core in-
troduction to language analysis, Rouledge/London and New York, 2001. 
5.
 
Scott Thornbury. Beyond the Sentence: Introducing discourse analysis, Macmillan, 2005. 
Дополнительная
 литература 
6.
 
Ивашкин, М.П. Практикум по стилистике английского языка [учебное пособие]/ М.П. Иваш-
кин, В.В. Сдобников, А.В. Селяев.-М.: АСТ: Восток-Запад, 2005.- 101 с. 
7.
 
Пелевина, Н.Ф. Стилистика английского художественного текста. – Л.: Просвещение, 1980. – 
270с. 
8.
 
Разинкина, Н.М. Функциональная стилистика. – М.: Высшая школа, 1989. – 181с. 
9.
 
Sosnovskaya, V.B. Analytical Reading. - Moscow: Higher School, 1974. – 179 p. 
10.
 
 Companion to Literature in English, Denmark, 1994. 
11.
 
 Dictionary of Biography, Moscow, 1997. 
12.
 
 Modern English Short Stories, Moscow, 1961/ yahoo.ru., yandex.ru. 
 
Appendix I 
Character Analysis of ―Two Thanksgiving Day Gentlemen‖ 
 
In  this  lesson,  students  will  read  the  O.  Henry  short  story  "Two  Thanksgiving  Day  Gentlemen."  Through 
scaffold learning  tasks,  the  students  will  analyze  the two  main  characters  and  their  interactions throughout 
the  story.  Students  will  practice  using  various  strategies  to  determine  the  meaning  of  unfamiliar  words  in 
context. Students will also analyze the author's word choice, including his use of figurative language, and its 
impact on the tone of the story. These activities will build toward students' participation in a Socratic Semi-
nar  as  the  summative  assessment  for  the  lesson. The  text  of the  story,  reading comprehension  questions, a 
teacher  guide  to  assist  with  discussion,  a  vocabulary  handout,  and  Socratic  Seminar  questions  are  all  in-
cluded within the lesson. 
Subject(s): Techniques of Text Analysis 

158
 
 
Intended Audience: 3 year students 
Suggested Technology: Computer for Presenter, LCD Projector, Overhead Projector 
Instructional Time: 4 Hour(s) 
Keywords: character analysis, ―Two Thanksgiving Day Gentlemen,‖ O. Henry, Socratic Seminar, irony 
Instructional Component Type(s): Lesson Plan , Worksheet, Assessment, Text Resource, Formative As-
sessment 
Instructional Design Framework(s): Direct Instruction , Writing to Learn 
Special  Materials  Needed: All  necessary  materials  have  been  uploaded  as  attachments  to  the  lesson  or 
linked to within the lesson. 
ATTACHMENTS 
Perceptions.docx 
Text of storyTWO THANKSGIVING DAY GENTLEMEN.docx 
Student Handout for Two Thanksgiving Day Gentlemen.docx 
Socratic Seminar Questions.docx 
Vocabulary Handout.docx 
Teacher Handout TWO THANKSGIVING DAY GENTLEMEN.docx 
 
LESSON CONTENT 

 
Lesson Plan Template: General Lesson Plan 

 
Learning Objectives: What should students know and be able to do as a result of this lesson? 
o
 
Students  will  be  able  to  cite  strong  and  thorough  textual  evidence  to  support  their  analysis  of  "Two 
Thanksgiving Day Gentlemen," as well as any inferences they draw from the story. 
o
 
Students will be able to analyze complex characters from the story (particularly that of Stuffy Pete and 
the Old Gentleman) and how they interact with one another over the course of the story. 
o
 
Students will be able to determine the meaning of selected words and phrases from the story, including 
figurative and connotative meanings, and analyze the impact of word choice on the tone of the story. 
o
 
Students will be able to draw specific and appropriate evidence from the story to support their responses 
to questions on the student handout and for their assigned question for the Socratic Seminar. 
o
 
Using  a  Socratic  Seminar  format,  students  will  come  to the  discussion  prepared,  having  carefully  read 
"Two Thanksgiving Day Gentlemen" in order to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas 
with their peers. Students will be able to propel the conversation by posing and responding to questions 
and will verify or challenge ideas and conclusions formed by their peers. Students will also be able to 
qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence 
and reasoning presented by their peers. 

 
Guiding Questions: What are the guiding questions for this lesson? 
o
 
Are people always what they seem? In what ways can our impression or perception of someone some-
times be inaccurate? 
o
 
What are the intentions of the Old Gentleman towards Stuffy Pete and of Stuffy Pete towards the Old 
Gentleman? 
o
 
How would you describe the interaction between the Old Gentleman and Stuffy Pete? 
o
 
In what ways is this story built around the concept of tradition? 
o
 
In what ways could traditions be categorized as meaningful acts by those involved? 
o
 
In what ways could traditions be illustrative of a lack of meaning by those involved? 

 
Prior Knowledge: What prior knowledge should students have for this lesson? 
o
 
Students should be able to explain what a simile is, identify them in the context of a story, and interpret 
their meaning. 
o
 
Students should understand that the word connotation (or connotative) means the secondary meaning of 
a  word,  not  its  direct  definition.  It  is  an  association  or  idea  suggested  by  the  word.  Dictio-
nary.reference.com  uses  this  example:  The  word modern strictly  means  belonging  to  recent  times,  but 
the word's connotations can include such notions as new, up to date, experimental. 
o
 
Students should understand that tone is the author's attitude (this can include the author as the narrator of 
the story) toward a subject. The author reveals his (or her) attitude through the selection of words he uses 

159
 
 
to  describe  the  subject.  The  tone  can  also  be  determined  by  analyzing  not  only  the  word  choice  (also 
called diction) but the author's use of imagery, details, and sentence structure (syntax). 
o
 
Students  should  know  that  one  kind  of  tone  is  ironic  tone.  This  is  where  the  author  uses  a  word  (or 
words) to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal meaning. This includes sarcasm where what 
is said is not what is meant, and often it is said in a way to mock or insult someone. Sometimes with sar-
casm  it  emphasizes  a perceived  truth.  Ironic  tone  words  students  might  find  helpful for this  story:  hu-
morous, amused, mock-serious (jokingly serious), and witty. 
o
 
Students should know that in literature there are different types of irony; two types they would find use-
ful for "Two Thanksgiving Day Gentlemen" are verbal irony and situational irony. For verbal irony: the 
contrast between what is meant and what is said; sarcasm. For situational irony: Where the last thing you 
expect to happen, happens. It is a contrast between what the reader thought would likely happen (what 
would seem appropriate for the story) and what actually happens. 
o
 
Students  should  know  how  to  use  different  strategies  to  determine  the  meaning  of  unknown  words  in 
context (use of context clues, Greek or Latin affixes and roots, and reference materials like dictionaries 
and glossaries). 
o
 
Students should understand how to participate in a Socratic Seminar. However, information is included 
within the lesson to help the teacher and students with this task in case they have not done one before. 

 
Teaching Phase: How will the teacher present the concept or skill to students? 
Hook
1.
 
As a hook for the lesson, show students picture one in the attached 
Perceptions handout
. Ask students to 
think about (or write a short response in their notebooks) the following question: What is their perception 
or impression of each of the people in the painting? Use specific evidence from the painting for support. 
2.
 
Allow students to discuss their thoughts with a shoulder partner and then bring the class back together for 
a short group discussion on students' perceptions of the girl and the man in the painting. 
3.
 
Show students the second picture on the handout. Ask students to think about (or write a short response in 
their notebooks): How has your impression or perception of each person changed? Use specific evidence 
from the painting for support. 
4.
 
Allow students to discuss their thoughts with a shoulder partner and then bring the class back together for 
a short group discussion on how their perceptions changed. 
5.
 
Discuss as a whole group: Why do you think your initial impressions were inaccurate? Show students the 
final picture with the quote and ask students: What do you think this quote by Machiavelli means?  How 
does it relate to these pictures? 
6.
 
Tell students that we will be reading a story titled "Two Thanksgiving Day Gentlemen" by O. Henry. The 
concept of perception and people not always being what they seem will come into play in this story. 
7.
 
Go  over  the  objectives  and  guiding  questions  for  the  lesson  with  students.  Explain  to  students  that  the 
summative assessment for the lesson will involve their participation in a Socratic Seminar. The notes they 
will take throughout the lesson and questions that they will answer as they read will help them dig deeply 
into the story to help prepare them for the Socratic Seminar. Several of the guiding questions for the les-
son will appear in different forms in both the questions they will answer as they read the story and also in 
the Socratic Seminar questions. Teachers may want to post the guiding questions on the board. 
8.
 
Pass out a 
copy of the story
 and the 
student handout
 to each student. For ease of use, each paragraph in 
the story has been numbered. Note: Vocabulary words for students to work on determining the meanings 
of as they read the story are highlighted in green. Based on the needs of your students, you might wish to 
select different words before copying the story. 
9.
 
Teachers should read the first paragraph aloud to model fluency. After reading the paragraph aloud, go 
back  through  the  paragraph  and  help  students  make  sense  of  the  opening  lines  of  the  story.  A 
teacher 
handout
has been included to help teachers with discussion and analysis of the story. It is important to re-
member that there can be multiple interpretations appropriate in many aspects of literature and this hand-
out is meant to serve as a guide. Teachers can modify the contents of the teacher handout in any way they 
desire. Some aspects to include in discussion about the first paragraph (additional information is included 
in the teacher handout): 

160
 
 
– Point out to students that the narrator is an American. Ask students: what word choices reveal that he 
is an American? 
– Ask students: What do you believe "self-made" means, especially in the context of self-made Ameri-
cans? 
– Ask students: What tone is being used in the first paragraph? What word choices reveal the author's 
(through the narrator) tone? 
– Ask  students:  If  O.  Henry  is  correct,  and  most  Americans  don't  really  know  the  history  behind 
Thanksgiving, why do you think we continue to celebrate it? What is the meaning behind this celebra-
tion for different groups of people? 
10.
 
The  teacher  can  model  ways  to  determine  the  meaning  of  "proclamation."  Students  can  take  notes  on 
their
vocabulary handout
. A possible teacher think aloud could include: 
– In the last two sentences of this first paragraph, the narrator jokes that people are having to buy hens to 
eat  for  Thanksgiving  because  someone  in  Washington  is  leaking  out  advance  information  to  certain 
people  that  Thanksgiving  is  coming  and  these  folks  are  rushing  out  and  buying  up  all  the  turkeys. 
When he mentions Washington and people leaking information it makes me think maybe he is talking 
about politicians; perhaps the politicians are the ones in this Turkey Trust. The way "proclamation" is 
used in the sentence, it is a noun. The proclamation is in some way connected to the politicians and the 
advance information that is leaking out. Perhaps proclamation is some form of communication. When 
I look it up in the dictionary, I can verify that proclamation is a noun and it means a public or official 
announcement. 
11.
 
The teacher can read the second paragraph aloud. Discuss with students: The narrator seems to take pride 
in the 
fact that this holiday is an American holiday.  Ask students: Why might he be proud of this fact, 
especially if many do not know the history behind it? Is he proud of it, or is his tone sarcastic? What evi-
dence can you find to support your inference? 
12.
 
The teacher
 can model ways to determine the meaning of "institution." Students can take notes on their 
vocabulary handout. A possible think aloud could include: 
– When I look at the second paragraph in the story, it makes it seem like Thanksgiving Day is very im-
portant to the city being referenced and it also seems important to the narrator; he seems to describe 
the holiday with a little bit of pride that this is a holiday that is totally for Americans. Perhaps the word 
"institution" has something to do with the importance of this holiday. Based on how it is  used in the 
sentence it is a noun. When I look it up in the dictionary, multiple meanings for this word are shown. 
The  one  that  makes  the  most  sense  is  the  one  that  says  institution  is  an  established  law  or  custom. 
Thanksgiving Day is a national holiday and it occurs every year. It is a custom that many Americans 
participate  in  each  year.  The  other  definitions  that  describe  institution  being  an  organization,  or  a 
building, or a pattern of behavior, just don't fit the context of the sentence or the paragraph. 
13.
 
Read the third paragraph aloud. Then help students to see the narrator is about to tell the reader a story, a 
story  about 
traditions
,  traditions  that  have  come  about  because  of  people's  git-up  and  enterprise.  This 
phrase might mean that the traditions about to be described in the story came about because people took 
an initiative and started them. 
 
Guided Practice: What activities or exercises will the students complete with teacher guidance? 
0.
 
Allow students to work with a partner or small group to work through taking turns to read aloud the rest 
of  page  1.  (Page  numbers  described  in  the  guided  practice  section  are  based  on  the 
student  copy
 of  the 
story.) 
1.
 
After reading page one, students should work with their partner or group to determine the meaning of the 
green highlighted words in context of the story. Students can use the 
vocabulary handout
 to write down 
their preliminary definition and the strategy they used to arrive at this definition. Students can use context 
clues or Greek or Latin affixes and roots to determine a preliminary meaning of the word. Then students 
can look up the word in the dictionary to verify the accuracy of their determination. Students can use the 
vocabulary  handout  to  write  down  the  final  definition  they  came  up  with  after  combining  their  under-
standing with that of the dictionary definition. Note: The teacher should have hard copies of dictionaries 
for students to use or easy access for them to use online dictionaries. 
2.
 
Students will work with their partner or group to answer the first six questions on the student handout. 

161
 
 
3.
 
Students  and  teacher can  come  back  together  as  a  whole  group  and  discuss students'  definitions for the 
green highlighted words. As students share out their responses (and how they arrived at the definitions) 
the teacher can provide corrective feedback.  If needed, the teacher can model or think aloud for any of 
these words if students showed widespread difficulty with the process. 
4.
 
Have student partners or groups take turns sharing out responses for the first six questions. As students 
share,  the  teacher  can  add  additional  points  or  provide  corrective  feedback  if  needed.  Use  the teacher 
handout to discuss additional aspects of the story on this page. This includes (but is not limited to): 
– The setting is in New York City. 
– In paragraph four, help students understand that the narrator is referencing Charles Dickens, a British 
author, author of many works including A Christmas Carol. This story in particular inspired its readers 
to do good things for their fellow man, especially the poor and those in need. 
– In paragraph five, trysting means an appointed place of meeting. This word is important for students to 
understand as it helps the reader know that Stuffy Pete comes to this spot to meet someone. 
– In paragraph five, with the phrase "the result of habit than of the yearly hunger" students should rec-
ognize that today Stuffy Pete has come to the bench out of habit, rather than out of hunger-this is con-
firmed in the next paragraph. With this phrase students could make the inference that in the past Pete 
came to this location because he was hungry. 
5.
 
Have students return to their partner or group to work on reading aloud page 2. After students have read 
page 2 aloud, they can follow the same process as before, working to determine the meanings of the green 
highlighted words and then answering questions 7 through 12 on the handout. 
6.
 
Students  and  teacher  can  come  back  together  as  a  whole  group  to  discuss  students'  definitions  for  the 
words as well as their responses to the questions. The teacher will provide verbal corrective feedback as 
needed. Continue to use the teacher handout to discuss additional aspects of this part of the story. 
– In paragraph eleven have students take note that the word "Institution" is now capitalized. Through 
this  sentence  it  is  emphasized  that  this  custom  is  important  to  the  Old  Gentleman;  it  is  near  to  his 
heart.  With  the  word  "rearing"  it  could  mean  this  is  a  custom  or  tradition  he  is  raising,  almost  like 
"rearing" or "raising" a child. 
– In paragraph eleven, with the lines in this paragraph help students to see that we have a humorous tone 
here. He knows that one man feeding another on Thanksgiving is one small act but it is something. It 
certainly seems important to the Old Gentleman. 
– In  paragraph  fifteen  ask  students:  What  kind  of  tone  is  used  here?  Help  students  to  see  we  have  a 
mock-serious tone. The words the old man says to Stuffy Pete each year are a part of his time-honored 
9 year tradition of greeting him and then feeding him. The words aren't as important as the words in 
theDeclaration of Independence but they are important to Pete and to the old man. 
– At the end of paragraph fifteen help students to identify that the old man does not notice Pete is sweat-
ing or in pain. 
 
Independent Practice: What activities or exercises will students complete to reinforce  the con-
cepts and skills developed in the lesson? 
0.
 
Students will now independently read the last page and a half of the story. 
1.
 
Students will continue to use their graphic organizer as they work to determine the meanings of the green 
highlighted words. Students will need access to print or online dictionaries. 
2.
 
Students will then answer questions 13-22 on the student handout. 
3.
 
Depending on the teacher's curriculum time, they might wish to collect students' work for questions 13-22 
and provide written feedback and a grade. After passing back students' work, the teacher could address 
the questions the class had the most difficulty with and provide modeling or support for these questions. 
Or,  after the students  have  answered  the  questions,  the  teacher  could  call  on  different  students to  share 
their  responses. The  teacher  could  provide  the  rest  of  the  class  with  opportunities  to add  to or  disagree 
with the student's response. The teacher can provide corrective feedback as needed and allow students to 
add to or correct their written responses. The teacher can also use the teacher handout to discuss other as-
pects of the story's final pages. 
– Help students to see that because Pete is needy or disadvantaged, the men in the ambulance assumed 
he passed out because he was drunk, but when they didn't smell any alcohol on him, they sent him to 

162
 
 
the hospital. This is a good example of where their perceptions of him, because of his social class and 
the stereotypes often connected with it, were not correct. 
– Help students see the reader had assumed the old man was a man of wealth and the revelation that he 
wasn't rich was surprising. This is a good example of where the reader's perception of the old man was 
one thing and in reality he was something else (not rich and instead really financially struggling). 
– The teacher may also wish to discuss with students what they think about the fact that the old man did 
not eat with Pete at any of the past meals. Did he not eat because he was enjoying watching Pete enjoy 
his meal? Or did he not eat because he did not have the extra money at that time either? 
4.
 
If your students have not participated in a Socratic Seminar before, introduce the activity before passing 
out  the Socratic  Seminar  questions.  A  resource  teachers  may  find  helpful  for  their  own  learning  comes 
from a strategy guide and tools provided by ReadWriteThink.org. The teacher can show this video to stu-
dents to help them see the process in action. 
Through  watching  the  video  students  should  notice  that  they  are  the  active  participants  in  the  discus-
sion; the teacher is not significantly involved in the discussion. 

 
They should also notice that no one talks over one another; students wait for a pause or work to hop 
in on the discussion in a natural way (students do not raise their hands to be called on by other stu-
dents or the teacher). 

 
Students listen to one another in order to build on or counter a point made by their peers. 

 
Students continually refer back to the text to support their points. 

 
The conversation centers on the text and does not veer off into inappropriate or off topic conversa-
tion. Everyone is actively listening and not working on other things. 
5.
 
The teacher can use the Socratic Seminar handout for questions (there are seven questions) to use in the 
seminar if they wish. The teacher could cut out the questions into strips and pass out one question per stu-
dent. It is okay if multiple students have the same question as their analysis of the text through that ques-
tion will likely be different from their peers and this will add more to the conversation. Go over the direc-
tions  on  the  handout  with  students  and  help  them  to  understand  their  written  response  should  be  a  de-
tailed, well-written extended paragraph. They should use textual support from the story throughout their 
response. They will be able to refer to their written responses during the seminar. 
6.
 
Make sure students know that they can use their copy of the story, their notes, and their responses to the 
student  handout  questions  to  help them  when  answering  the  Socratic  Seminar  question.  Make  sure  stu-
dents understand that they will not be reading their written response verbatim, but they can refer to it dur-
ing the discussion. Also, make sure students understand that they will be participating in the discussion 
for questions beyond just the one they were assigned. This is why a careful reading of the story will help 
them throughout the seminar. If teachers want students to be able to see all the Socratic Seminar questions 
so they know what will be discussed overall, teachers can pass out the entire handout to them, rather than 
just the strip with their question on it. 
7.
 
The teacher should tell students that their written responses will be collected after the conclusion of the 
seminar  for  an  additional  participation  grade.  Knowing  that  their  written  work  will  be  collected  and 
graded  may  give  students extra  incentive  to respond carefully  and  thoroughly  in  their  written response, 
which will in turn help them to better prepare for their oral participation in the seminar. 
8.
 
Before beginning the seminar, go over the rubric for how students will receive an oral participation grade 
for the Socratic Seminar. Teachers might wish to use the analytic or holistic rubric from the Greece Cen-
tral School District to assess students' participation. 
9.
 
Students will now participate in the Socratic Seminar as their summative assessment for the lesson. The 
teacher should limit their involvement in the seminar to putting out the first question (you can pick any 
question off the list to begin with) and helping with procedures. For example, if students begin to get off 
task,  redirect  them  to  the  text.  If  it  seems  like  the  discussion  of  a  question  has  been  exhausted  put  out 
another question from the list for students to discuss. The teacher should take notes on students' participa-
tion during the seminar. It would be helpful to have a copy of the rubric in front of you and a chart with 
students'  names  on  it  with enough  blank  space  to take  a  few  notes about  each  student's  participation to 
justify your final assessment grade. You may also want to check off as each student shares their verbal re-

163
 
 
sponse  to  their  assigned  question  with  the  group.  You  can  also  make  check  marks  each  time  a  student 
verbally participates and the quality of their responses. 
10.
 
Note: When you put out a question, have the students who were assigned that question have the first op-
portunity to respond to the question and share their thoughts. Then the rest of the students can naturally 
participate and propel the conversation by clarifying, verifying, or challenging ideas presented by their 
peers. 
11.
 
Collect students' written responses after the seminar has been completed in order to give students a par-
ticipation grade for their written work. 
 
 
 
Closure: How will the teacher assist students in organizing the knowledge gained in the lesson? 
To wrap up the lesson and help students synthesize what they learned: 
0.
 
Teachers could return to the guiding questions for the lesson and have a brief whole group discussion on 
some of the questions to see how students' thinking has changed during the course of the lesson. 
1.
 
Teachers could also use or adapt this Socratic Seminar reflection handout from the Greece Central School 
District to provide students with a way to reflect on their experience in the Socratic Seminar, reflect on 
their thinking about the story, and set goals for their involvement in future seminars. 
 
ASSESSMENT 

 
Formative Assessment:  
During the lesson: 
The lesson includes multiple stopping points for the teacher to check in with students and gather in-
formation about student understanding. After page one in the story, then after page two, and finally after 
students complete the story, the teacher will gather students back into whole group for each of these read-
ing portions to have students share their responses to the questions on the student handout for that section, 
as well as their responses to the vocabulary words for that section. Through these checkpoints, the teacher 
will  be  able  to  determine  if  students  need  remediation  or  for  the  teacher  to  perform  more  think  aloud  to 
help students with their reading comprehension or strategies to use to determine the meaning of unfamiliar 
words in context. 

 
Feedback to Students: 
Students will receive feedback at each of the stopping points listed above. Teachers will provide ver-
bal corrective feedback and perform additional modeling or think aloud as needed to help students with any 
reading comprehension questions they get stuck on or any vocabulary words they are having trouble deter-
mining  the  meanings  of.  The  teacher  also  has  the  option  to  collect  students'  questions  and  vocabulary 
handout  for  the  work  done  in  the  independent  practice  section  and  provide  written  feedback  instead.  At 
each of the stopping points through the feedback that the teacher provides students can apply that feedback 
and any new understandings gathered to the next section of reading they will complete. Furthermore, stu-
dents  can  apply  all  the  feedback  received  throughout  the  lesson  to  assist  with  their  preparation  for  the 
summative assessment, a Socratic Seminar. 
Depending on the needs of their students, teachers have the option of collecting students' written res-
ponses to the Socratic Seminar question before they participate in the seminar. This will allow the teacher 
to  give  written  feedback  and  students  can  then  revise  their  work  before  the  seminar  begins  to  help  them 
with their preparations for this discussion. 

 
Summative Assessment: 
Students will receive feedback at each of the stopping points listed above. Teachers will provide ver-
bal corrective feedback and perform additional modeling or think aloud as needed to help students with any 
reading comprehension questions they get stuck on or any vocabulary words they are having trouble deter-
mining  the  meanings  of.  The  teacher  also  has  the  option  to  collect  students'  questions  and  vocabulary 
handout  for  the  work  done  in  the  independent  practice  section  and  provide  written  feedback  instead.  At 
each of the stopping points through the feedback that the teacher provides students can apply that feedback 
and any new understandings gathered to the next section of reading they will complete. Furthermore, stu-
dents  can  apply  all  the  feedback  received  throughout  the  lesson  to  assist  with  their  preparation  for  the 
summative assessment, a Socratic Seminar. 

164
 
 
Depending on the needs of their students, teachers have the option of collecting students' written res-
ponses to the Socratic Seminar question before they participate in the seminar. This will allow the teacher 
to  give  written  feedback  and  students  can  then  revise  their  work  before  the  seminar  begins  to  help  them 
with their preparations for this discussion. 
 
ACCOMMODATIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS 

 
Accommodations: 

 
--The teacher could incorporate more think aloud into the lesson to help students with strategies to 
determine the meaning of unfamiliar words in a text.  
– The teacher or strong student readers could read aloud a larger portion of the story to model fluency 
before having students work in partners or small groups. With this read aloud, the teacher and students 
could work together to answer the questions from the student handout for the entire portion that is read 
aloud. This would allow the teacher to build in think aloud to help students see what reading strategies 
they are using as they work to make sense of the text and answer the questions.  
– The teacher could decrease the number of questions on the student handout.  
– The teacher could have students text code as they read the story. Students could highlight or code the 
text with a special marking for words that describe Stuffy Pete and words that describe the Old Gen-
tleman.  They  could  highlight  or  code  the  text  to  mark  details  that  describe  the  interaction  between 
these two men.  
– The teacher could select a small group of students to model participation in a Socratic Seminar using a 
question that connects to the story. This could take place before the full class formally participates in 
the seminar. 

 
Extensions: 
– Students could work with a partner to create a question of their own for the Socratic Seminar.  
– Students could respond to the following prompts in an extended written paragraph: 
o
 
Which character is more selfless? Use textual evidence to support your claim. 
o
 
How  does  O.  Henry  use  diction  to  manipulate  our  impressions  of  the  characters?  Use  textual 
evidence to support your claim. 
– Teachers could also have students take one of the questions from the Socratic Seminar and create a 
full essay using their notes from their reading and from the Socratic Seminar. 

 
Suggested Technology: Computer for Presenter, LCD Projector, Overhead Projector 

 
Special Materials Needed: All necessary materials have been uploaded as attachments to the lesson 
or linked to within the lesson. 
 
Appendix
 2 
Why use graphic organizers? 
 
The human brain naturally looks for connections between old and new information. Additionally, stu-
dies  have  shown  that  the  brain  processes  information  most  efficiently  in  chunks.  Graphic  organizers  com-
plement both of these processes by helping students: 

 
Visually sort new information into familiar categories 

 
Analyze the relationships between old and new information 

 
Create a simple structure for thinking about information in new ways 

 
Review concepts and demonstrate understanding 
Graphic organizers can be used in all phases of learning from brainstorming ideas to presenting find-
ings. Reading A-Z has assembled a collection of effective organizers that may be tailored to most classrooms 
or students. 
 
 
What
 are graphic organizers? 
 
Graphic organizers can support all subject areas, languages, and levels of learning. Reading A-Z pro-
vides two collections of graphic organizers--one for primary grades (K-2) and one for intermediate grades (3-

165
 
 
6). These collections are arranged according to the reading strategy, comprehension skill, or learning process 
they best facilitate. The majority of the organizers in both collections can be adapted for use in all classrooms 
and for learners of all abilities. 
 
When  using  graphic  organizers  with  early  readers,  teacher  guidance  may  be  necessary.  As  readers 
progress,  they  may  benefit  from  completing  the  organizers  independently  (the  brain  remembers  best  when 
personal creativity has been invested in the exercise). To facilitate the learning process, encourage the use of 
a  variety  of  mediums,  including  colored  markers,  crayons,  and  pencils.  If  possible,  it  benefits  students  to 
have  the  graphic  organizers  reproduced  on  colored  paper.  Give  students  as  much  freedom  as  possible  to 
create and complete their organizers. 
KWL Organizer 
 
How To Use It: KWL organizers are normal used to spark your creative side using inquiry. We have 
students complete this at the introduction phase of a lesson or unit and then follows you through the comple-
tion of that lesson and /or unit. K stands for "What do you already know?" (prior knowledge). W stands for 
"What do you want to learn?" (students generate their own questions and hopes). L is usually completed at 
the conclusion of the lesson or unit. L stands for "What Did I Learn?" (demonstrating knowledge that was 
gained.) 
KWL Organizer 
How To Use It: KWL organizers are normal used to spark your creative side using inquiry. We have 
students complete this at the introduction phase of a lesson or unit and then follows you through the comple-
tion of that lesson and /or unit. K stands for "What do you already know?" (prior knowledge). W stands for 
"What do you want to learn?" (students generate their own questions and hopes). L is usually completed at 
the conclusion of the lesson or unit. L stands for "What Did I Learn?" (demonstrating knowledge that was 
gained.) 
 
 
 
 

166
 
 
Venn Diagram 
How To Use It: We all know this oldie, but goodie. The classic and standard method for comparing 
two entities. 
 
 
 

167
 
 
Who, What, When, Where, How, Why Map 
How To Use It: We all know this oldie, but goodie. The classic and standard method for comparing 
two entities. 
 
 
 
 

168
 
 
Big Mac Paragraph Format Organizer 
How To Use It: This is a huge favorite of many teachers worldwide. Yeah, we updated the burger. We 
call it "Chesse Burger 2.0"! 
 
 
 

169
 
 
Character Analysis Pyramid Organizer 
How To Use It: Super helpful when you are reviewing a story. We look at one single character. 
 
 
 

170
 
 
Elements of the Story Organizer 
How To Use It: Document the antagonist or villian in any story. This makes it just a little more fun. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

171
 
 
Приложение 4 
САМОСТОЯТЕЛЬНАЯ РАБОТА СТУДЕНТОВ 
Аспект «РАЗГОВОР». 
 направление «Лингвистика и межкультурная коммуникация» 
для студентов 4 года обучения 
 
Составитель: АХМЕТОВА Э.Д. – преподаватель кафедры Лингвистики 
 
Суть метода проектов 
 
Метод проектов - это таким образом организованная, поисковая, исследовательская  деятель-
ность  студентов, которая предусматривает не просто достижение того или иного результата, оформ-
ленного  в виде конкретного практического выхода, но организацию процесса достижения  этого ре-
зультата. В современной педагогике метод проектов применяется не вместо систематического пред-
метного обучения, а наряду  с ним   как компонент системы образования. 
Метод  проекта  -  это  способ  достижения    дидактической  цели  через  детальную  разработку 
проблемы. Проект- это возможность студентам выразить свои собственные идеи в творчески проду-
манной форме. Проект на уроках английского языка - это также реальная возможность использовать 
полученные на других предметах знания, средствами  иностранного языка. 
Метод проектов - это путь развития активного, самостоятельного мышления студента, чтобы 
научить его не просто запоминать  воспроизводить знания, которые дает им  преподаватель, а уметь 
применять эти знания на практике. 
 
Этапы подготовки работы над проектом 
 
1 этап - этап планирования, организационная работа
Моя задача - вызвать  интерес к теме и настроить студентов на восприятие материала с помо-
щью вступительной беседы. 
2 этап- подготовительный. Для этого активизирую для работы лексику и грамматические кон-
струкции. Чтобы сформировать у студентов  необходимые умения  и навыки в том или ином  виде 
речевой деятельности сформировать  лингвистическую компетенцию на уровне, определенной про-
граммой и стандартом, необходима активная устная практика для каждого студента группы англий-
ского языка. Важно предоставить им возможность  мыслить, решать какие-то проблемы, которые по-
рождают мысли рассуждать на английском языке над возможными путями решения этих проблем с 
тем,  чтобы  студенты  акцентировали  внимание  на  содержании  своего  высказывания,чтобы  в  центре 
внимания была мысль, а английский язык выступал в своей прямой функции-формирования и фор-
мулирования этих мыслей. 
3 этап-выполнение проекта. Студенты собирают информацию, пользуясь различными услуга-
ми (библиотека,  интернет). Главная задача на этом этапе- сбор информации и оформление еѐ. 
4 этап-презентация и защита проекта. В свой практике использую проекты творческого харак-
тера, практико-ориентированные, ролевые и игровые. Это и моно проекты. 
В практике применяются различные проекты: 1 проект рассчитан на одну неделю. 
 
Этапы работы над проектом студентов 
 
Метод проектов направлен на обучение планированию:  

 
студент должен уметь четко определить цель;  

 
описать основные шаги по достижению поставленной цели;  

 
концентрироваться на достижении цели, на протяжении всей работы;  
развитие творческого мышления: 

 
пространственное воображение; 

172
 
 

 
самостоятельный перенос теоретических знаний в практику; 

 
комбинаторные умения; 

 
прогностические умения. 
умения работать с информацией: 

 
отбирать нужную; 

 
анализировать; 

 
систематизировать и обобщать; 

 
выявлять проблемы; 

 
выдвигать обоснованные гипотезы их решения; 

 
ставить эксперименты; 

 
статистически обрабатывать данные; 

 
генерировать идеи; 
формирование позитивного отношения к работе: 

 
студент должен проявлять инициативу, энтузиазм;  

 
стараться выполнить работу с установленным планом.  
 
Метод проект: Самостоятельная работа студентов по аспекту «РАЗГОВОР» 
 
Группа: ПА-3-10. 


1   ...   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   ...   29


©emirsaba.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал