Сборник материалов VIІІ международной научной конференции студентов и молодых ученых «Наука и образование 2013»



жүктеу 5.01 Kb.

бет26/44
Дата22.12.2016
өлшемі5.01 Kb.
1   ...   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   ...   44

 
YOUTH SLANG AS A SOCIAL PHENOMENON 
 
Кадыркулова А. К., 
arayka9928@mail.ru
 
Л.Н.Гумилев атындағы Еуразия ҧлттық университеті, Астана 
Ғылыми жетекшісі – Д.М. Ксанова  
 
We are inclined to believe that language has its specific to change all the time. New words 
and expressions appear and evolve. The words and pronunciations used by young people nowadays 
can  be  radically  different  from  those  used  by  adults.  As  far  as  we  concerned,  living  in  a 
multicultural  society  has  an  effect  on  a  language,  especially  of  young  people,  whose  friends  are 
often from a mix of backgrounds. Mass Media, especially TV and music also have a massive impact 
on the language of the  young.  For instance, often UK singers will even  sing in  American accents 
without realizing. 
Young people use lots of language that you usually cannot find in most dictionaries. These 
highly  informal  words  and  expressions  are  known  as  slang.  Slang  words  and  expressions  are 
characterized by a high degree of informality, familiarity, vocabulary richness. Moreover, they are 
realized by a specific group of people whose members are connected with some particular link, such 
as  territory  (Californian),  age  (teenagers),  subculture  (students),  and  mainly  occur  in  the  spoken 
form of the language.  It is not possible to come up with a complete list of modern British slang. By 
the time the list was completed, it would be out of date. New words come and go like fashions.  
An obvious reason for choosing to concentrate on slang is that it is itself a controversial and 
spectacular  social  phenomenon,  an  ‗exotic‘  aspect  of  an  otherwise  predictable  language 
environment. An even better reason is that it is a variety which belongs to young people themselves.   
Researchers into adolescent language usage have tended to concentrate on the links between 
language  and  hierarchies,  status  and  deployment  of  social  capital.  More  recently,  however,  some 
specialists have started to look at such ‗carnivalesque‘ manifestations as profaning, mischief, banter 
and teasing, the borrowing of ethnically marked codes to signal empathy and solidarity in ‗crossing‘ 
(Rampton 1995), and anticipated a change of emphasis in Bernstein‘s words ‗from the dominance 
of  adult-imposed  and  regulated  rituals  to  dominance  of  rituals  generated  and  regulated  by  youth‘ 
(Bernstein,  cited  in  Rampton  2003).  None  of  these  studies  has  taken  slang  into  account  although 

 
185 
there  has  been  a  plea,  again  by  Rampton,  for  more  attention  to  ‗the  social  symbolic  aspects  of 
formulaic language‘. [1,12] 
Eble,  in  the  only  book-length  study  in  recent  times  devoted  to  North  American  campus 
slang, has shown that the slang of middle-class college students is more complex and less a product 
of  alienation  than  has  been  assumed  in  the  past  [2,34].  Her  recordings  of  interactions  reveal,  too, 
that  the  selective  and  conscious  use  of  slang  itself  is  only  part  of  a  broader  repertoire  of  style-
shifting  in  conversation,  not  primarily  to  enforce  opposition  to  authority,  secretiveness  or  social 
discrimination, but often for the purposes of bonding and ‗sociability‘ through playfulness.  
John Benjamins considered slang words not to be distinguished from other words by sound 
or  meaning.  Indeed,  all  slang  words  were  once  cant,  jargon,  argot,  dialect,  nonstandard,  or  taboo. 
For example, the American slang to neck (to kiss and caress) was originally student cant; flattop (an 
aircraft carrier) was originally navy jargon; and pineapple (a bomb or hand grenade) was originally 
criminal  argot.  Such  words  did  not,  of  course,  change  their  sound  or  meaning  when  they  became 
slang. In fact, most slang words are homonyms of standard words, spelled and pronounced just like 
their standard counterparts, as for example (American slang), cabbage (money), cool (relaxed), and 
pot (marijuana). Each word sounds just as appealing or unappealing, dull or colourful in its standard 
as in its slang use. Also, the meanings of cabbage and money, cool and relaxed, pot and marijuana 
are  the  same,  so  it  cannot  be  said  that  the  connotations  of  slang  words  are  any  more  colourful  or 
racy than the meanings of standard words [3,65] 
In our view, learning English entails learning not only formal language but also slang, which 
is  bound  up  with  both  social  and  linguistic  conventions  that  may  be  essential  for  comprehension. 
That  suggests  that  under  the  proper  circumstances,  i.e.,  in  a  properly  constructed  social  context 
slang  can  convey  cultural  attitudes  and  ideas  more  efficiently  than  conventional  usage.  From  the 
linguistic  point  of  view,  E.  Mattiello  gives  the  following  definition  of  slang  ―Slang  -  informal, 
nonstandard words and phrases, generally shorter lived than the expressions of ordinary colloquial 
speech, and typically formed by creative, often witty juxtapositions of words or images‖. [4,50] 
To  our  mind,  each  society  can  be  divided  into  many  groups  regarding  to  interests,  tastes, 
professional  affiliation,  political  and  social  points  of  view,  etc.  The  members  of  the  groups  may 
belong  to  several  ones  at  the  same  time,  so  they  will  be  aware  of  all  the  peculiarities  concerning 
these groups. According to Beregovskaya E.M. variety of such groups leads to the deviation from 
some language standards and creation of so-called «micro languages» within these groups. Each of 
these  «micro languages» develops  within the boundaries of one particular  group. Such languages 
are not spread far and wide as they are nonuniversal ones. [5, 36] This leads us to believe that slang, 
i.e., youth slang as a social phenomenon is a nonstandard vocabulary composed of words or senses 
characterized primarily by connotations of extreme informality; slang fills a  necessary niche in all 
languages,  occupying  a  middle  ground  between  the  standard  and  informal  words  accepted  by  the 
general  public  and  the  special  words  and  expressions  known  only  to  comparatively  small  social 
subgroups (group of young people).    
The fact that slang does enter the common language is one thing. It signals formal meanings 
in  an  informal  way,  and  it  may  also  symbolize  a  whole  range  of  beliefs  and/or  attitudes  of  a 
subculture.  Concrete  abstractions  such  as  these  involve  the  user  of  the  slang,  the  listener  to  the 
slang,  and  the  linguistic  target  of  the  designation  itself,  in  a  specific  cultural  frame  of  reference. 
That is to say sociological properties are derived from slang´s multiple nature and its function. As 
E. Mattiello offers they can be classified into two groups with respect to either the speaker (speaker-
oriented)  or  the  hearer  (hearer-oriented).  refers  to  four  characteristics  of  speaker  with  regard  to 
appropriate sociological properties.[4,47] 
 
As a member of a particular group (group-restriction, individuality, secrecy, privacy, 
culture-restriction, prestige). 
 
As a person with a concrete occupation or activity (subject-restriction, technicality). 
 
As  a  person  of  low  cultural  status  using  bad  language  (informality,  debasement, 
vulgarity, obscenity). 

 
186 
 
As  an  individual  of  a  certain  age  or  generation  from  a  certain  regional  area  (time-
restriction, ephemerality, localism). 
As the speaker-oriented properties of slang determine the speaker, hearer oriented properties 
characterize the hearer and the effect they produce upon him with a view to 
 
Amusing the hearer (playfulness, humor). 
 
Breaking up his monotony of neutral style (freshness, novelty, unconventionality). 
 
Impress  the  hearer  with  extraordinary  expressions  (faddishness,  color,  and 
musicality). 
 
Mock, 
offend 
or 
challenge 
the 
hearer 
(impertinence, 
aggressiveness, 
offensiveness)[4,53] 
The  importance  and  frequency  of  sociological  properties  used  in  slang  vary  from  the 
linguists´ different point of view. Thus, most of the properties are not considered so much crucial 
and it may happen that they are not even mentioned in some linguistic studies on slang. 
As slang is the language of the youth it is interesting for us to find out where it comes from. 
At all times the  youth  could not live without music. For some people it is a way to relax, and for 
others  -  an inexhaustible source of inspiration. Teenagers  even try  to  look like their idols,  and let 
alone  the  imitation  of  the  way  of  speaking.  For  instance,  following  the  example  of  ―The  Pink 
Floyd‖,  the  name  of  their  song  «Another  brick  in  the  wall»  became  a  synonym  of  the  informal 
teenager. 
Song  lyrics  often  contain  slang  words  and  expressions.  For  instance,  slang  word  Phunk 
(Black  Eyed  Peace  ―Don‘t  phunk  with  my  heart‖)  is  an  euphemism  (polite  way  of  saying 
something) for fuck; Don‘t phunk with my heart = don‘t play with my heart, and according to the 
classification  of  sociolinguistic  features  of  slangs  given  by  Mattiello  Phunk  regards  to  Obscenity: 
slang synonyms flourish in the taboo subjects of a culture.  
Another example from the same song is Yee-haw! - an exclamation of excitement associated 
with  unsophisticated  country  people  from  the  South  –  Orality  -  typical  fillers  of  everyday 
conversation and never used in formal written language associated with spoken language. [7] 
Chill out (Avril Lavigne ―Complicated‖) is a slang that refers to the Ephemerality:  slang is 
an ephemeral, short-lived, ever changing vocabulary. Novel words and special meanings crop up at 
very  brief  intervals,  but  generally  remain  in  current  use  for  a  short  time,  and  then  pass  away  as 
quickly  as  they  have  been  created.  Thus,  while  some  words,  such  as  chap,  chum  and  grub  ―have 
been  slang  for  a  long  time‖  [6,78],  other  words  (called  ―vogue  words‖  in  the  literature),  such  as 
massiveparanoid and reckon, ―have become fashionable for a short period of time‖ [3, 65].  
In Eminem‘s ―Without me‖ we can find the following ones: Weed meaning marijuana refers 
to the subject-restriction: sometimes slang is described as the special, even specialized, vocabulary 
of some profession, occupation or activity in society. This makes slang peculiar to a set of people 
who are identified by their specific terminology or by the specialized terms they use within group 
members. In particular, specific slang words such as crack (‗a potent, crystalline form of cocaine‘), 
junkie (‗a drug addict‘) and joint (‗a marijuana cigarette‘) are related to the topic of drugs, and creep 
(‗a  stealthy  robber‘),  dog  (‗an  informer;  a  traitor‘),  and  the  Family  (‗the  thieving  fraternity‘)  are 
connected with the crime topic. [7] 
Slang is worthy of the attention of linguists in its own right, but further that, as an exciting 
and  controversial  form  of  language  which  belongs  to  young  people  and  to  youth  culture.  So  this 
leads  us  to  believe  that  context  –  physical,  social,  psychological,  emotional  –  is  the  decisive 
sociolinguistic factor of communication effectiveness, and that mastering context may prove more 
important for mastering the language than mere attention to linguistic phonemes. 
 
References 
 
1.
 
Rampton,  B,  Crossing:  Language  and  Ethnicity  among  Adolescents,  Harlow  and  New  York: 
Longman, 2003 –p.12  

 
187 
2.
 
Eble,  C.  Slang  and  Sociability.  London  and  Chapel  Hill:  University  of  North  Carolina  Press, 
1996.-p.34 
3.
 
Stenström,  A.-B.,  G.  Andersen  &  I.K.  Hasund    Trends  in  teenage  talk:  Corpus  compilation, 
analysis and findings -  John Benjamins, Amsterdam/Philadelphia, 2002 – p. 65 
4.
 
Elisa Mattiello An Introduction to English Slang -  Polimetrica International Scientific Publisher 
Monza/Italy, 2008 – p. 47-60   
5.
 
Береговская  Э.  М.  Молодежный  сленг:  формирование  и  функционирование  //  Вопросы 
языкознания. - 1996. - № 3. - С. 32-41. 
6.
 
Andersson, L.G. & P. Trudgill Bad language - Blackwell, Oxford, 1990 –p.78 
7.
 
www.digitalspy.co.u 
 
 
METHODS AND ACTIVITIES OF USING MOBILE PHONES IN TEACHING FOREIGN 
LANGUAGE 
 
Каламбаева Г. Б., 
gulnazkalambaeva@mail.ru
                                                  
Л.Н.Гумилев атындағы Еуразия ҧлттық университеті, Астана 
Ғылыми жетекшісі – А. М.Тулегенова  
 
Today, the rapid development of technology has led to the mechanization of modern society, 
which  is  to  empower  people,  involves  changes  in  the  system  of  social  values.  
Nowadays,  we  cannot  imagine  a  modern  lesson  without  the  using  innovative  technologies.  These 
technologies  have  become  an  essential  tool  in  raising  students'  interest  to  study  the  problems  and 
develop  visual-creative  thinking.  All  this  leads  to  a  new  system  of  knowledge,  change  of 
consciousness, a rethinking of the whole picture of the world: there is automation of the man who, 
in dealing with people manifests itself in different ways. The using innovative technologies in the 
school provide the opportunity to enhance cognitive, mental and independent activity of students, to 
intensify the educational process. These technologies make it possible not only to change the forms 
and  methods  of  teaching,  but  also  significantly  transform  and  enrich  the  educational  paradigm. 
The experiences  show that  the English  language  allows for  the  formation and development  of the 
child. 
  
Now  almost  all  the  schools  have  computers,  multimedia  installations,  and  interactive 
whiteboard, with free Internet access. Therefore the use of innovative technologies in the teaching 
of English has become not only necessary but also feasible. 
 
And  also  one  of  the  innovative  technologies  includes  Mobile  learning.  Mobile  learning 
involves the use of a mobile phone, which has each student for providing mobility for learning. 
Teachers  of  English  as  a  foreign  language  who  want  to  develop  successful  lessons  face 
numerous  challenges,  including  large  class  sizes  and  inadequate  instructional  materials  and 
technological support. The purpose of this article is to describe the methods and activities of using 
mobile phones as an effective method of teaching FL. 
These  days  it  seems  mobile  phones  are  used  everywhere  by  everyone,  which  leads  to  the 
obvious  question:  How  can  mobile  phone  technology  support  learning  in  the  foreign  language 
classroom? The answer is ―in a number of ways‖ because mobile phones come with ever-increasing 
functions  that  most  students  are  adept  at  using.  In  this  article  we  describe  some  practical  ways  to 
use  mobile  phones  to  support  foreign  language  learning,  both  inside  and  outside  the  classroom.    
Most of the activities will work with most mobile phones and do not require special knowledge or 
additional  software  or  hardware.  Recent  interest  in  the  potential  for  mobile  phones  and  other 
portable devices to support learning and teaching has been driven by the fact that mobile phones are 
relatively cheap and increasingly powerful. Another benefit is that learners are used to working with 
them, often more so than with computers. The famous scientists in this field Thornton and Houser 
report that young Japanese learners prefer to use mobile phones for many activities, from emailing 
to reading books. Research on the use of mobile phones for the delivery of vocabulary materials to 

 
188 
English  learners in  many Asian countries  also  in our country show that students  enjoy using their 
phones  because  of  easy  access  to  materials  and  the  ability  to  practice  anytime  and  anywhere,  in 
addition,  some  students  like  the  screen  size  limitations,  which  make  the  amount  of  content  more 
manageable than that of other teaching materials. According to foreign English teachers, there are 
several  pedagogical  reasons  to  consider  using  mobile  phones  in  the  second  language  classroom. 
Most importantly, phones are social tools that facilitate authentic and relevant communication and 
collaboration among learners. [4, 20] 
In  many  schools  in  our  country  are  available  wireless  networks  for  students.  Wireless 
communication technology are applied to many fields such as GPS navigation, wireless monitoring 
system as well as learning various materials including learning language skills. Mobile learning can 
take place either  within the classroom  or outside it.  In the  former case,  mobile phones  possessing 
appropriate software are very effective in collaborative learning among small groups. Although this 
type  of  learning  has  nothing  to  do  with  the  mobility  property  of  such  devices,  it  provides  the 
learners  with  the  opportunity  of  close  interaction,  conversation,  and  decision-making  among  the 
members of their group due to the specific design of the learning activity on mobile phones. These 
types  of  interaction  among  learners  and  their  physical  movement  can  hardly  be  achieved  when 
desktop  or  laptop  computers  are  to  be  used.  Mobile  learning  technology  is  more  useful  for  doing 
activities outside the classroom. Such activities enable learning to be more directly connected with 
the  real  world  experiments.  Moreover,  learning  through  mobile  phones  outside  the  classroom  has 
the  advantage  of  better  exploiting  the  learner's  free  time;  even  the  students  on  the  move  can 
improve their learning skills. [2, 31] 
 SMS-based learning is another development in the use of wireless technologies in education 
in which receiving wanted text messages supports learning outside of classroom and helps learners 
benefit from their teacher's experimentation with mobile technology. 
 Game-based learning is another theme for mobile learning in which learning materials are so 
designed  to  be  integrated  with  aspects  of  physical  environment.  In  such  environments,  learning 
activities are facilitated using the mobile technology which serves as a link between the real world 
of knowledge and the visual world of the game.  
One of the easiest ways to use a mobile phone for learning is to record samples of the target 
language by taking pictures. Students can take pictures of English text by using the Camera feature 
on  their  mobile  phones.  They  can  then  make  a  collage  of  the  images  or  upload  the  pictures.  If 
students do not have a data connection, they can transfer the pictures to a computer and upload them 
from there. 
These  activities  for  using  mobile  phones  for  foreign  language  learning  generally  focus  on 
developing  the  four  skills  and  in  many  cases  integrate  speaking  with  listening  and  reading  with 
writing. The material  and activities can be modified to  conform  to  different  syllabi  and are  easily 
adaptable for different ages, learning levels, and interests. It is important to note that the names of 
the features used here may not be the same for all mobile phones. 
Many  researchers  were  so  interested  in  mobile  assisted  language  learning  approaches  that 
they  attempt to  provide  some strong supports to  conduct  further studies on this  discipline. Today, 
mobile  learning  is  easily  possible  by  delivery  of  various  learning  materials  or  content  to  learners 
through the mobile devices. Various activities related to language learning are supported by mobile 
devices among which we can name SMS, internet access, camera, audio/video recording, and video 
messaging (MMS).  
One of the advantages of mobile learning is that collaborative learning is very encourages in 
this  kind  of  learning.  That  is,  different  learners  are  able  exchange  their  knowledge,  skills  and 
attitudes  through  interaction.  Collaborative  learning  helps  the  learners  to  support,  motivate  and 
evaluate each other to achieve substantial amounts of learning, the property which is almost absent 
in other kinds of learning. One can attain a good collaborative approach simply by using a mobile 
device as an environment for learning, which is, of course, highly dependent of the  users than the 
devices. Devices, in fact, act as pencils and calculators which are the basic equipment in a learning 

 
189 
process  of  a  student.  What  is  important,  here,  is  the  communication  between  the  learners,  as  an 
important factor in language learning is the interaction in the target language. [3, 12]  
There  are  different  mobile  devices  in  the  market  compatible  to  the  needs  of  different  users. 
The basic activities can be performed by many mobile phones. However, for language learning, the 
cost  and  technologies  related  to  the  mobile  devices  should  be  taken  into  consideration.  Such 
learners can use their customized mobile devices for language learning based on their own abilities.  
When, in 1973, the mobile devices were invented for the first time, no one ever thought some 
day they would become an important part of routine life. As soon as the mobile phones became a 
crucial  part  of  our  lives,  there  felt  a  need  for  using  them  in  language  learning  tasks.  These  days 
mobile devices such as PDAs, phones, and other handheld devices, are used everywhere for doing 
everything ranging from voice calling to making short message, video chat, listening to audio, web 
surfing, shopping, and the like. Apart from these benefits, mobile devices have increasingly grown 
toward  becoming  tools  for  education  and  language  learning,  and  all  its  users  from  teachers  or 
students  are  getting  used  to  this  environment  to  make  education  as  ubiquitous  as  possible. 
Moreover, the emerging of internet made open and distance learning a means of receiving education 
from  all  parts  of  the  world.  In  a  short  period,  the  attractiveness  of  distance  learning  led  to  the 
realization  that  various  mobile  devices  provide  a  very  effective  resource  for  education.  This  way, 
many researchers tried to make mobile devices a rich resource for teaching and learning. It was, in 
fact, a challenging affair to cover learning tasks by a mobile phone. 
MALL deals with the use of mobile technology in language learning. Students do not always 
have to  study a  foreign language in  a classroom.  They may have the opportunity to  learn it using 
mobile  devices  when  they  desire  and  where  they  are.  As  learning  English  is  considered  a  main 
factor for professional success and a criterion for being educated in many communities, providing 
more convenient environment for people to  learn English  is  one of the strategic educational  goals 
towards improving the students' achievement and supporting differentiation of learning needs. 
There  are  many  researches  and  developments  towards  the  use  of  wireless  technology  for 
different  aspects  of  language  learning.  In  the  following  lines  it  has  been  tried  to  demonstrate  the 
benefits  of using mobile phones  in  learning English  as a second language. Areas  of mobile-based 
language  learning  are  diverse  among  which  the  most  common  ones  are  vocabulary,  listening, 
grammar, phonetics, reading comprehension, etc. 
The rising speed of mobile technology is increasing and penetrating all aspects of the lives so 
that this technology plays a vital role in learning different dimensions of knowledge. Today, a clear 
shift  from  teacher-led  learning  to  students,  that  m-learning  allowed  causes  the  students  feel  using 
the technology more effective and interesting than before. In fact, we can provide a richer learning 
environment through mobile phones for our language learners. Though many researchers have been 
carried out  towards MALL technology  as  a  growing field  of study in  language learning, there are 
still so many works left to be done and a large amount of information to be uncovered. Moreover, 
the methods with the help of which mobile device technology can be used to provide a more robust 
learning environment have to be further improved. The ways through which the barriers of CALL 
have  been  removed  can  help  the  MALL  technology  to  grow  with  less  effort  and  cost.  Some 
language  skills  such  as  speaking  and  listening  as  mobile-based  activities  need  some  further 
improvements  due  to  the  hardware  weaknesses.  Mobile-based  learning  or  m-learning  faces  many 
challenges,  but  it  has  grown  in  exponentially  in  spite  of  all  its  problems  to  provide  a  better 
environment for language learning. [1, 6] 
Mobile learning technology, however, has a rapid pace of development from a teacher-learner 
text-based  approach  to  a  forthcoming  multimedia  supporting  technology.  In  addition,  podcast 
lectures  and  digitized  audio  comments  made  the  online  interaction  between  teachers  and  learners 
possible in a more convenient way without any time and space limitations. 
Although going through language activities on mobile phones may take longer time compared 
to computers, the learners feel a greater sense of freedom of time and place, so that they can take 
the advantage of spare time to learn a second language when and where they are. 

 
190 
Mobile  technology  gets  learning  away  from  the  classroom  environment  with  little  or  no 
access  to  the  teacher,  though  the  learning  process  can  hardly  be  accomplished  without  a  teacher's 
direction or guidance. As the demand for acquiring a foreign language increases and the people time 
for more formal, classroom-based, traditional language learning courses decreases, the need felt by 
busy users for learning a foreign language through MALL will inevitably increases. In other word, 
MALL can be considered an ideal solution to language learning barriers in terms of time and place. 
 
References 
 
1.
 
Chen,  C.  M.  &  S.-H.  Hsu.  ―Personalized  Intelligent  Mobile  Learning  System  for  Supporting 
Effective English Learning‖. Educational Technology & Society. 2008 
2.
 
Gay, G.; M. Stefanone, M. Grace-Martin, & H. Hembrooke. ―The effects of wireless computing in 
collaborative  learning  environments‖.  International  Journal  of  Human-Computer  Interaction.  
2001 
3.
 
Kennedy,  C.  &  M.  Levy.  ―L‘italiano  al  telefonino:  Using  SMS  to  support  beginners‘  language 
learning‖. 2008 
4.
 
Thornton,  P.  &  C.Houser.  ―Using  mobile  phones  in  English  education  in  Japan.  Journal  of 
Computer Assisted Learning‖. 2005 
 

1   ...   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   ...   44


©emirsaba.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал