Сборник материалов VIІІ международной научной конференции студентов и молодых ученых «Наука и образование 2013»



жүктеу 5.01 Kb.

бет27/44
Дата22.12.2016
өлшемі5.01 Kb.
1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   ...   44

 
LINGUA-CULTURAL PECULIARITIES OF SELF-EXPRESSING IN SOCIAL 
NETWORKS 
 
Kanafina A. Y., 
aigera_kanaphina@mail.ru
 
Л.Н.Гумилев атындағы Еуразия ҧлттық университеті, Астана 
Ғылыми жетекшісі – O.V. Vorobyov 
 
We must  say that the role of emotion in online communication, particularly, from the perspective 
of social psychology and for older communications media like e-mail and chat rooms have already 
been  investigated  by  many  researchers.  Online  social  networks  facilitate  connections  between 
people based on shared interests, values, membership in particular groups (i.e., friends, professional 
colleagues), etc. They make it easier for people to find and communicate with individuals who are 
in their networks using the Web as the interface.  
There are several different online social networks, but for our purposes, we shall focus on the one 
that tends to be used mostly by learning professionals–Facebook. This network has its own unique 
style, functionality and pattern of usage. You will also find that different people are active in these 
different networks.  
Social networking is the practice of expanding the number of one's business and/or social contacts 
by making connections through individuals. While social networking has gone on almost as long as 
societies  themselves  have  existed,  the  unparalleled  potential  of  the  Internet  to  promote  such 
connections  is  only  now  being  fully  recognized  and  exploited,  through  Web-based  groups 
established for that purpose.  
The  object  of  a  social  network  is  to  find  friends  and  expand  relationships.  Top  social  networking 
websites  allows  members  to  search  for  other  members  in  a  safe  and  easy  to  use  environment. 
Common search functions include search by name, city, school and email address.  
Facebook is the world‘s largest social network, with more than 900 million users. Mark Zuckerberg 
founded Facebook in 2004 while he was attending Harvard University.  
Facebook has affected the social life and activity of people in various ways. With its availability on 
many  mobile  devices,  Facebook  allows  users  to  continuously  stay  in  touch  with  friends,  relatives 
and other acquaintances wherever they are in the world, as long as there is access to the Internet. It 
can also unite people with common interests and/or beliefs through groups and other pages, and has 

 
191 
been  known  to  reunite  lost  family  members  and  friends  because  of  the  widespread  reach  of  its 
network. 
Some  argue  that  Facebook  is  beneficial  to  one's  social  life  because  they  can  continuously  stay  in 
contact  with  their  friends  and  relatives,  while  others  say  that  it  can  cause  increased  antisocial 
tendencies  because  people  are  not  directly  communicating  with  each  other.  Some  studies  have 
named Facebook as a source of problems in relationships. Several news stories have suggested that 
using  Facebook  can  lead  to  higher  instances  of  divorce  and infidelity,  but  the  claims  have  been 
questioned by other commentators. 
Status is a posting on a social networking site that indicates a user‘s current situation, state of mind, 
or opinion about something. 
Many  researchers  have  already  investigated  the  role  of  emotion  in  online  communication, 
particularly from the perspective of social psychology and for older communications media like e–
mail  and.  These  studies  have  typically  used  interviews  or  questionnaires  to  discover  perceived 
communication  patterns  and  emotion  factors,  such  as  personality  types.  It  seems  that  no  previous 
published  study  has  investigated  the  role  of  emotion  in  SNS  Friendship  communication,  although 
some have investigated aspects of emotion in SNSs. 
An  emotion  is  generally  a  response  of  a  person  to  a  situation  in  which  he/she  finds  himself.  A 
situation which is out of the ordinary one for an individual is likely to result in emotional activity. 
This  emotional  activity  is  generally  random  and  disorganized.  It  is  accompanied  by  feelings  or 
pleasantness or unpleasantness and universally associated with marked changes in the chemistry of 
the body. 
It  goes  without  saying  that,  anger  is  one  of  those  emotions  that  can  be  destructive  and  lead  to 
various problems if it goes unnoticed. Although it can be tough sometimes, with the various types of 
anger around, recognizing when anger first occurs is a key factor in determining what to do when it 
rears its ugly head. 
Here are 12 of the most common kinds of anger.  

 
Behavioral  Anger;  Passive  Anger;  Constructive;  Self-inflicted  Anger;  Volatile;  Chronic 
Anger; Judgmental; Overwhelmed Anger; Retaliatory Anger; Paranoid; Deliberate Anger  
 
The  communicative  behavior  of  the  people  is  defined  by  their  national  mentality  and  national 
character.  
We have set out to research one of the Western and one of the Eastern cultures involved in network 
interactions.  We would like to  analyze one of their negative emotions  -  anger. We take American 
and  Korean  people.  So,  according  to  this,  let  us  look  closely  at  their  cultural  peculiarities.  The 
sociologist  of  Lord  to  Bryce  describes  Americans  as  good-natured,  promising,  formed,  moral, 
religious, but not reverential, with a commercial vein, sociable; thus he considers them changeable 
and conservative.  
Americans’ culture: 
 
Negative emotions are expressed rather openly - rude expressions, curses. 
 
As  a  whole,  it  is  impossible  to  call  the  majority  of  Americans  reserved,  close-minded  and 
disciplined people. They are - noisy, vigorous, emotional and easily excitable  
 
Initial  question  «Do  you  like  America?  »  suggests  the  answer  «lt's  fine,  great»  and 
enthusiasm existence. Any other answer is regarded as rudeness. 
 
Unacceptable  questions  –  why  do  you  have  no  children,  whether  you  are  going  to  get 
children why you not married or are unmarried. 
 
In  communication with  a familiar or unfamiliar  interlocutor it is  not  accepted to  ask about 
the details of private life (about marital status, for example, the size of a family, number of 
children, about diseases the person was ill or is ill with). 
 
Americans sincerely believe that they know themselves adequately well 
 
The American dialogue is spoken at fast rates; it is not accepted to speak to one lengthily 
 
Americans react to words of the interlocutor rather emotionally 

 
192 
Koreans culture: 
 
Communications  should  be  brief  and  to  the  point  -  Koreans  prefer  nutshell  as  opposed  to 
waffle. 
 
Insults and discussion of sensitive issues between newly associated parties are strictly taboo 
and should only be broached with the introducer. 
 
Greet people individually; the same applies when saying good-bye.  
 
We‘d like to have an analysis of lingua-cultural peculiarities of self-expressing in social networks 
from one of the most popular social network site – Facebook. Nowadays it is not so hard to identify 
people, who are dissatisfied with many things. Thus we proceed to compare Americans and Korean 
people. 
For example: (Americans) 
-
 
God bless you Senator Sanders! (
SparkyMcBiff
)  
-
 
You sound putzy. (
Scott Johnson
 ) 
-
 
Homer Simpson. (
EternalxJourney

-
 
Sanders is pissed off (
Wagner Gomes
 ) 
-
 
We are soooooooooooooooooooooo screwed! (
Wagner Gomes
 ) 
-
 
IM MAD AS HELL AND IM NOT GUNNA TAKE IT ANYMORE!!!!! (John Farley ) 
-
 
You are TOTALLY wrong! He is a nut (
Daemon Nice

These  comments  are  from  one  movie  in  Facebook.  They  show  their  discontent  with  Senator 
Bernie‘s  words.  They  do  not  agree  with  his  opinion.  Americans  react  to  words  with  much 
emotionality.  
Basically,  they  communicate  on  a  more  superficial  level;  serious  themes  are  not  touched  upon; 
"heart to heart" talk is a rare occasion. So when they have problems in life, they have to consult a 
psychiatrist rather than sharing their concerns with others. 
On the topic of politics and religion, they are unlikely to speak on. They talk about work, weather, 
cars, repairs of houses, road traffic, etc. If one talks to Americans about some deeper concerns and 
personal  matters,  or  analyzes  something,  they  will  not  encourage  it.  Also  you  can  have  trouble 
arguing with them, the same goes for disagreeing, contradicting, and interrupting.  
Practically  in  all  situations  Americans  are  inclined  to  direct,  open  discussions  on  any  problems 
which  arise  between  them  and  the  interlocutor,  and  the  tendency  to  call  things  by  their  names 
avoiding innuendoes is obvious. 
It  is  connected  with  the  aspiration  of  Americans  as  soon  as  possible  to  settle  all  problems  which 
have been especially connected with business. The frankness which was found in these situations of 
Americans sometimes is treated by foreigners as sharpness or even roughness.  
Americans  are very direct  in  expression of emotions.  It  is  not  accepted to  hide emotions; positive 
emotions can be publicly expressed by the extremely emotional interjections.  
One  more  important  manifestation  of  the  American  frankness  is  the  habit  not  to  hide  personal 
problems in verbal interaction and be free about telling about them. 
So, according to the above comments, we can determine to what type of anger it is related. All of 
these comments  are related to  behavioral,  passive, verbal and  retaliatory  kinds  of anger. They  are 
aggressive towards whatever triggered their anger. This can be someone who always seems to act 
out, or is troublesome. They are expressed through words and not actions. They criticize and insult 
people  (put  them  down).  Their  comments  occur  as  a  direct  response  to  someone  else  lashing  at 
them. People use sarcasm or mockery. 
Example of Korean people‘s comments: 
-
 
They must be insane! 
-
 
 I've met my share of dumbasses, creeps and weirdoes but rapists?? 
-
 
Look how mad that hippie is! 
-
 
You done what you came for now go home and sort out you economy. 
-
 
Koreans are not easy to defeat we are determined and fight till the end! 

 
193 
As you can see Koreans are more reserved in expressing their discontent. These comments are taken 
from the news.  
This topic is about Anti-Japanese, anti-American, anti-new government protests.  It is claimed that 
every  year  the  number  of  protests  and  demonstrations  average  11,000  while  large-scale 
deployments of riot police average 85. A humiliating history of colonization and a strong sense of 
crisis  have  created  ―angry  Koreans‖.  Over  the  years  there  was  a  lot  of  crime;  people  burned 
themselves, made suicidal jumps from roofs, rioted, etc. 
Some  scholars  believe  that  because  of  Korea‘s  small  size  and  limited  resources,  there  is  a 
widespread sense of crisis and urgency amongst the people, creating the ―angry Koreans‖, allowing 
them to use an indomitable spirit to fight for democracy, equality, and justice, crying out for their 
country‘s future and their nation‘s prosperity.  
Koreans do not like excessive display of emotion. 
Similar to the Americans‘ comments, all of the given Koreans‘ comments are referred to behavioral, 
verbal, retaliatory types of anger. Such comments like ―I‘ve met my share of dumbasses, creeps and 
weirdoes but rapists??‖ and ―You done what you came for now go home and sort out you economy‖ 
can  pertain  to  judgmental  anger.  They  put  other  people  down  and  make  them  feel  bad  about 
themselves,  or  their  abilities.  They  express  their  feelings  by  making  those  around  them  feel 
worthless.  They  also  are  aggressive  towards  whatever  triggered  their  anger.  This  can  be  someone 
who  always  seems  to  act  out,  or  is  troublesome.    Sometimes  the  outcome  is  physical  abuse  or 
attacks  against  others.  They  are  expressed  through  words  and  not  actions.  They  criticize,  insult 
people (put them down) and complain. Their comments occur as a direct response to someone else 
lashing at them. People use sarcasm or mockery, as a way to hide their feelings, typically express 
this form of anger. 
We  did  not  observe  any  constructive,  self-inflicted,  volatile,  chronic,  overwhelmed,  paranoid  and 
deliberate  types  of  anger.  We  failed  to  trace  the  precedence  when  people  were  acting  out  by 
punishing themselves for something they had done wrong. The described utterances did not show us 
the  form  of  anger  which  occurs  in  varying  degrees.  There  were  not  any  comments  which  would 
show us that a person we had come across was seemingly angry for no reason, or mad all the time. 
There was not any person who would feel jealously towards others, because they felt other people 
had  or  wanted  to  take  what  was  rightfully  theirs.    Or  they  did  not  act  out  because  they  felt 
intimidated  by  others.  They  did  not  use  anger  to  gain  power  over  a  situation  or  person.  A  person 
expressing this form of anger may not fall into anger, but will get angry when something does not 
turn  out  the  way  he/she  wants.  These  two  different  cultures  have  no  such  gaping  differences 
between  social  networking  modes.  But  they  have  some  distinctions  in  their  cultural  behavior  in 
respect to etiquette and openness.  
So, American-based SNSs exhibit more frequent self-discourse, and rely more on direct text-based 
communication.  Asian-based  SNSs  tend  to  have  tighter  social  relationships,  with  their  practices 
reflecting an indirect communication style and less open self-disclosure.  
 
References 
 
1.
 
http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/social-networking 
2.
 
http://social-networking-websites-review.toptenreviews.com/
 
3.
 
"Facebook reunites father, daughter after 48 years"
. MSN India (Delhi). January 27, 2010 
4.
 
Gardner, David (December 2, 2010). 
"The marriage killer: One in five American divorces now 
involves Facebook"
Daily Mail (London) 
5.
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Facebook

6.
 
http://www.eslstarter.com/korean-culture-and-customs.php/
 
7.
 
http://www.chinasmack.com/2011/pictures/angry-koreans-chinese-netizen-reactions.html/ 
 
 

 
194 
THE PROBLEM OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING FOR 
ADULTS 
 
                                                   Кarienova G. K. 
Л.Н.Гумилев атындағы Еуразия ҧлттық университеті, Астана 
Ғылыми жетекшісі - Anasheva D.K. 
 
The current stage of Kazakhstani development is focused on the rapid progress of the state 
among  50  most  competitive  countries  in  the  world.  Therefore  our  education  policy  is  aimed  at 
forming a national model of education which could integrate into the global educational space and 
provide  competitive  employees  in  the  global  labor  market.  Education  which  is  available  for 
everyone – is not only essential humanistic requirement and necessary element of social state, but 
the term of under which Kazakhstan can get the status of the knowledge society as well.  
Over  the  past  few  years,  a  crucial  part  is  paid  to  the  expansion  of  peoples‘  knowledge  in 
learning foreign languages. Nowadays, it can be considered as the age of information technology 
and therefore the significance of knowing the international language among all kind of generations 
is noticeably increasing[1, 95]. 
Older  adults  studying  a  foreign  language  are  usually  learning  it  for  a  specific  purpose:  to  be 
more effective professionally, to be able to survive in an anticipated foreign situation, or for other 
instrumental reasons. Affective factors such as motivation and self-confidence are very important 
in language learning. Many older learners fear failure more than their younger counterparts, maybe 
because  they  accept  the  stereotype  of  the  older  person  as  a  poor  language  learner  or  because  of 
previous unsuccessful attempts to learn a foreign language.[2, 24]  When such learners are faced 
with a stressful fast-paced learning situation, fear of failure only increases. The older person may 
also exhibit greater hesitancy in learning. Thus, teachers must be able to reduce anxiety and build 
self-confidence in the learner.  
In  problem-based  learning  classrooms,  the  roles  and  responsibilities  of  both  teachers  and 
learners are different from those in more traditional types of school-based learning. Generally, in 
problem-based  classrooms,  the teacher acts  as a coach for or facilitator of activities that students 
carry out themselves [3, 63]. 
Adult  learners  need  materials  designed  to  present  structures  and  vocabulary  that  will  be  of 
immediate use to them, in a context which reflects the situations and functions they will encounter 
when using the new language. Materials and activities that do not incorporate real life experiences 
will  succeed  with  few  older  learners.  Adult  learn  English  as  a  second  or  foreign  language  much 
faster than the children.  They  imitate the teacher‘s pronunciation, sentences, phrases, and  words 
more  easily.  They  explicit  rules  which  explain  how  sentences  are  put  together,  produced,  and 
pronounced.  They  may  ask  for  the  meanings  of  words,  but  they  are  able  to  intuitively  identify 
salient  features  of  the  meanings  of  a  word  and  use  the  word  more  correctly.  Language  learning 
should be encouraged in all the classes and in all the environments. Adult have a natural curiosity 
to investigate the environment in greater detail [4, 57]. 
To solve some of the problems, a systematic approach should be followed. The teachers should 
aim at teaching primarily, not knowledge but skill, the different skills required for good Listening-
Speaking-Reading-Writing.  Teachers  should  find  some  way  of  helping  pupils  to  enjoy  their 
language activities, and of building their confidence. 
 
Teaching  and  learning  with  adult  students  is  generally  approached  in  a  different  manner 
than  with  children.  The  underlying  reasons  for  this  are  the  focus  of  this  module.  In  addition,  we 
will explore the needs of literacy students and meet some 
typical  students.
  An  adult  must  be  emotionally  comfortable  with  the  learning  situation  to  learn. 
Many adult learners come to our classrooms with a low self-image and a recognition that they have 
failed in some way.  
There  are  natural  feelings  about  inadequacy  that  stem  from  growing  older;  some  feelings 
are artificially induced by society; some feelings come from past personal experiences with family, 

 
195 
peers,  and  educators.  It  is  important  to  recognize  that  adult  students  must  feel  welcomed, 
encouraged and enabled. They should not be judged or criticized.[5,98] 
 
 
                      Reference: 
 
Celce-Murcia, Marianne, and Lois McIntosh. 1979. Eds. Teaching English as a Second or Foreign 
Language. Rawley, MA: Newbury House Publishers, Inc.  
 
Crystal,  David.  1987.  The  Cambridge  Encyclopedia  of  Language.  Cambridge,  England: 
Cambridge University Press. 
 
Day, Richard R. 1993.  Ed. New Ways in  Teaching Reading. Alexan-  dria, Virginia:  Teachers of 
English to Speakers of Other Languages, Inc. 
 
Lessow-Hurley,  J.  (2003).  Meeting  the  needs  of  second  language  learners:  An  educator's  guide. 
Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. 
 
Echevarria,  J.,  Vogt,  M.,  &  Short,  D.  J.  (2004).  Making  content  comprehensible  for  English 
language learners: The SIOP model (2nd ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon 
 
NEOLOGISMS AS NEWLY-COINED PHRASES FINDING THEIR WAY INTO ENGLISH  
Концевая Анастасия Юрьевна, 
kate_marvell@mail.ru
   
Студентка Филологического Факультета ЕНУ им. Л.Н.Гумилева, Астана, Казахстан 
Научный руководитель – Латанова Р.У. 
Neologisms  -  words  and  phrases  created  to  describe  new  concepts  of  political,  scientific,  or 
commonly  character  formed  by  the  current  language  in  word-formation  models  and  laws,  or 
borrowed from other languages. In its structure and mode of formation neologisms exist in several 
versions. The most typical method of neologisms formation in the English language newspapers are 
word formation (compounding, affixation, conversion, reduction), changing the meaning of words 
and borrowings from other languages.  The first method of word formation of English neologisms is 
compounding.  Compounding  is  a  fusion  of  two  or  more  bases  to  form  new  words.  For  English 
compound  words  formations  consisting  of  two  pillars  are  the  most  frequent.  Recently,  in  the 
English language, and especially the American newspapers, a large number of nouns were formed 
by the conversion method of compounding combinations of verb and adverb. In some of them there 
is a clear repetition of the second component, which in some cases suggests that there is a definite 
relationship between the form and its meaning. Therefore it is often possible to predict the meaning 
(or meaning of the distribution area) of the each new formed word. But often such predictions can 
not be done for the entire group some words, which impede the understanding of new words.[1] 
Examples of this type are the words: 
ride-in - a protest against discrimination against blacks travel in buses; 
fish-in - a protest against the limitation of fishing territory by American Indians; 
apply-in - the requirement of equal opportunities in employment; 
Recently, in  the language of the  British press  nouns with  component-in  began to  appear,  with the 
meaning of the competition, contest, tournament, conference. 
read-in - match readers; 
recite-in - competition reciters; 
sail-in - Regatta; 
However, there are the component-in English words that do not have such a common meaning: 
buy-in - a bargain (the cost paid by the seller on the exchange); 
tie-in - load when buying a hot commodity; 

 
196 
A similar model is used to form nouns from verbs and other adverbs. Often the same adverb joins 
different verbs, and the meaning of each new word is unique. Typically, these words came into the 
language through different newspaper genres. For example: 
over: take-over - the seizure of power; 
switch-over - a transition (change the subject); 
push-over - easy driving obstacle; 
Complex English words are often used for the names of the realities take place in the country, and it 
requires knowledge of extralinguistic factors to understand them, such as: 
fight-back - countermeasures (after administrative action), fight back. 
sit-down protest - sit-in protest; 
shut-down - closing, liquidation (the company), for example; 
These words occur in such large numbers, and so often, that many of them still do not have a steady 
spell  (together,  separately  or  with  a  hyphen),  for  example:  shutdown,  shut-down,  shut  down.  The 
other  method  of  word-formation  is  affixation.  Affixation  is  the  formation  of  new  words  with 
prefixes  and  suffixes.  For  newspaper  style  the  appearance  of  affixed  neologisms  with  a  set  of 
common affixes, and the unusual combination of bases and affixes. In many cases, affixes develop 
new meanings previously alien to them.[2] 
For example:-ship. This Anglo-Saxon suffix was used for the formation of abstract nouns with the 
meaning of the state, the provisions, for example: friendship, leadership, lordship. It was considered 
counter-productive  for  a  long  time,  because  the  new  words  with  -ship  were  not  formed  for 
centuries.  In  the  newspaper  vocabulary  suffix-ship  combined  with  the  morpheme  -man  forms 
abstract nouns with the meaning of quality, features: 
craftsmanship - the art of influencing the masses; 
oneupmanship - the desire to be first; 
statesmanship - the wisdom of the statesman. 
The same can be said of the non-productive suffix-dom, which now is used to form new words in a 
newspaper vocabulary, and thus gained productivity, such as: 
Bangdom - organized crime; 
bogdom - the living dead end; 
officialdom - official circles. 
The  formation  of  new  words  with  prefixes  and  their  frequent  use  is  also  characteristic  for 
newspaper language. 
Using prefixes political terms were formed, such as: demilitarization - remilitarization, nazification-
denazification-renazification (revival of Nazism). 
A lot of words with the prefix non- recently appeared in the newspapers: 
non-access to nuclear weapons - the prevention of nuclear weapons; 
non-affiliated union - the American union, is not part of a large association of trade unions; 
non-beligerent country - a country not involved in the war;[1] 
 
Conversion  is  the  another  way  of  word-formation.  Conversion  is  moving  words  from  one  part  of 
speech to another, leading to the formation of a new word without changing its initial shape. This is 
another source of neologisms in English. Formed on conversion, they are widely distributed in the 
newspaper  vocabulary.  High  frequency  of  words  formed  by  conversion  -  one  of  the  hallmarks  of 
newspaper  style.  They  are  the  verbs  derived  from  nouns  and  nouns  derived  from  verbs.  It  is 
pertinent to note that the newly formed word often develop meanings that  only indirectly related to 
the based word. For example, in the pair to hit - a hit we can observe an interesting development in 
the meaning of the noun. As a result of translations and rethinking the meanings  a hit has come to 
mean the success. A similar development can be observed in the following pairs: 
to  print  -  a  print;  of  the  following  combinations  it  can  be  seen  that  in  the  noun  meaning  evolved 
print  circulation,  the  number  of  printed  copies  of  all:  the  total  print  of  editions  -  total  print 
publications; 
to cut - a cut; noun acquired meaning decline, retrenchment, abolition. 

 
197 
In the newspaper vocabulary, especially in the part that relates to political events, advertising, there 
are partially substantivized words - a kind of conversion, in which the word gets only a few signs of 
a noun, such as article or plural. For example: 
the unemployed - people who don‘t have a job; 
casuals - comfortable shoes for every day
home beautifuls - household objects (bathrobe, slippers and so on); 
Reduction is another type of word formation, which is also a source of neologisms. A great amount 
of  reducted  words,  especially  common  in  headlines  -  a  characteristic  feature  of  a  newspaper 
language. It should be noted that if the reductions are widespread in the XX century in all European 
languages, in the English language they were particularly numerous. The process of reducing words 
and  phrases  was  contributed  primarily  external  (social)  factors.  This  is  primarily  scientific  and 
technical  progress,  dramatically  increased  the  need  for  short  name  of  the  organization,  facilities, 
materials.  The  appearance  of  the  telegraph,  which  required  saving  of  linguistic  resources.  The 
development of mass media enabled to memorize abbreviations wide range of people. Gradually the 
words entrenched in everyday use. Some reduction occurring in the English newspapers, were born 
in the paper and commonly used for all styles of speech, there are some that are rarely found outside 
of  the  newspaper,  the  third  came  to  the  newspaper  from  the  language  of  technical  literature, 
language of business, that is, from other functional styles. Abbreviation is contraction of the words 
to  one  letter,  for  the  most  part  to  be  spelled:  HO  -  Home  Office.  Some  abbreviations  in  which 
consonants alternate with vowels and which resemble ordinary words are read by reading rules:[1] 
UNESCO - United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization; 
WHO - World Health Organization; 
NASA - National Aeronautics and Space Administration; 
As a rule, these reductions have long routinely use, are not explained in the text. 
Another way of neologisms formation  in language newspaper is to change the meanings of English 
words. It is connected with the change of the valence bonds of words or the possibility of their use 
in different contexts. As the press releases targeted at the general  reader, changing the meaning of 
words  is  often  based  on  the  norms  of  everyday  speech,  and  these  words  are  used  in  a  figurative, 
often exaggerated sense.[2] 
Lobby: 
 1 His first value – hallway 
2 a political term for the parliamentary lobbies 
3 a person who "handles" of the Congress members in favor to approve the boss‘ bill.  
4 a person who gathers information for his master, and sneak his policies 
5 a journalist entitled to priority in publishing information about the activities of Parliament. 
6 an appeal to the Parliament or other public authority, any requirement. 
The  third  way  of  the  appearance  of  neologisms  in  the  paper  is  borrowed  from  another  language. 
These words assimilate the language by repetitive gradually. Their appearance is caused by various 
reasons.  For  example,  the  French  detente  (easing  international  tensions),  which  is  now  frequently 
used in the British and American press, has emerged as a consequence of the peace-loving policy of 
the Soviet Union, proclaimed the easing of international tension by maintaining world peace.[2] 
 
References 
 
1.
 
Л.Ф.Дмитриева,  С.Е.Кунцевич,  Е.А.Мартинкевич,  Н.Ф.Смирнова.  Английский  язык. 
Курс перевода. – Москва – Ростов-на-Дону: ‗Март‘, 2005. – 40-41 
2.
 
Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics. Word-Formation in English, Ingo Plag. 
 

1   ...   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   ...   44


©emirsaba.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал