Сборник материалов



жүктеу 2.8 Kb.

бет3/20
Дата15.03.2017
өлшемі2.8 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   20

Литературы 
 
1.  Государственный  общеобязательный  стандарт  образования    
Республики  Казахстан.  Начальное  образование.  Основное  среднее  об-
разование. Общее среднее образование. Основные положения. Астана, 
2008. -24 с. 
2.  Послание Президента Республики Казахстан Н.Назарбаева на-
роду  Казахстана.  28  февраля  2007  г.  [Электронный  ресурс]  –  Режим 
доступа: http://www.akorda.kz  
 
 
 
‘Double’ degrees, ‘joint’ diplomas, ‘shared’ curricula, … : towards a  
destructuring form of the multilateralisation of higher education ? 
 
 
Pierre Chabal, PhD 
University of Le Havre / Sciences-po Europe-Asie campus 
Invited professor, national universities of Kazakhstan, China,  
Uzbekistan, Mongolia, Japan 
 
Presentation at the Symposium 
Contemporary trends of development of higher education : 
quality assurance and the global context 
KazNTU University, Almaty, May 2013 
 
The world is presently experiencing again a globalizing trend, that of 
higher education and research. If this were a rational evolution, slow as was 
the construction of an international academic system throughout the Antiq-
uity and the Middle Ages, it would be a continuation of history. Yet today, 

 
30
it is more of a rupture in history, or even a rough acceleration of history, to 
the runaway homogenizing and de-structuring of history. 
Governments  and  educational  policy-makers  are  in  fact  faced  with a 
dilemma.  Either  they  assert  their  national  sovereignty  in  education  and, 
thus, run the risk of falling behind in the global competition for knowledge, 
for degrees and for skilled jobs. Or they  engage in the internationalization 
of their education system and they run the risk of being diluted in standards 
and criteria beyond their control. Certainly, the choice is not easy.
6
 
There is, to be sure, in these questions, a link with "the pursuit of ex-
cellence”. This link is however tenuous. When some countries attract mas-
sively  the  best  students  from  other  countries  -  the  "brain  drain"  -  the  stu-
dents  rush  into  the  open  arms  of  a  national  system  (Chinese,  Japanese 
American,  Soviet,  British,  etc.).  What  is  happening  today  is  a  regional 
competition and largely a supranational one (the Bologna system, the Uni-
versity of Shanghai Cooperation, etc.). 
There  exists  clearly  a necessary  to  participate in the  internationaliza-
tion of higher education (I) but also to resist losing the national characteris-
tics of education systems (II). 
I  -  The  necessary  participation  in  the  internationalization  of  higher 
education 
Taking  into  account  realities  requires  to  acknowledge  world  evolu-
tions. The world is changing from era to era. It has opened up from the 16th 
century through the great discoveries. It has known of colonisations. It has 
torn itself  in the  world  wars.  It  divided  in  the Cold  War.  Today  it  is  open 
again. Therefore,  the  education  authorities  must  understand  that  the  world 
of education has changed, too, to a new form of competition (1), including 
through a new form of international culture of training, which tends towards 
uniformity (2). 
A) the invention of an educational form of post-Cold War rivalries 
1  / The realist  school  of  international relations analysis  suggests  that 
actors strive to compete more than to agree. In other words, states have in-
creasing  difficulties  to  build  together,  not  to  compete  against  each  other. 
The  forms  of  their  competition  may  change  but  this  competition  characte-
rizes the power relations in the world. It may be territorial, economic, mili-
tary  or  ideological  competition,  as  has  been  the  case  for  millennia.  There 
                                                
6
.  See  P.  Chabal  Interregional  Competition  as  innovated  world  order  :  is  it 
enhancing  exchanges  or  destabilising  the  world ?,  in  EurŒconomica,  vol.  8,  n°  1, 
2012,  pp.  107-130;  firs  presented  at the  international  conference International  Law 
and Free Trade, RMIT, Melbourne
 

 
31
may be cultural competition, as in the case of the great empires of history, 
or, as from the colonial era, the desire to impose its cultural, linguistic or - 
today - educational model. 
2 / Education is indeed a very specific area, where contemporary riva-
lries  generate  comparative  advantages  for  the  future.  Since  the  end  of  the 
Cold War, rivalries in the world have become more cultural and ideational. I 
do not subscribe to the theories of Huntington, suggesting a violent and de-
structive confrontation between cultures and religions. I suggest that educa-
tional  issues  are  carriers,  in  the  post-Cold  War,  of  factor  of  rivalries  that 
structure the world of the 21
st
 century. 
3 / In 2006, in Moscow, I presented a paper on this subject.
 7
 I showed 
that the idea of bringing together all education systems in the world would 
be counterproductive. This would result in a loss (of differences) since dif-
ferences generate the richness of diversity. Indeed, education contributes to 
the formation of nations, of peoples and of individuals. You can not create 
an undifferentiated "educational man" any more than you can erase the his-
torical, linguistic, musical and culinary differences among nations.  
4 / What interest would a world offer where everyone would be simi-
lar and identical and where all knowledge would be the same, all certitudes 
shared and all differences disowned on the ground that they would interfere 
with the single truth ? Science, as we know, is built mainly through succes-
sive  rebuttals  and  questioning  as  to  the  knowledge  acquired.  Without  this 
feature, there would have been no opportunity for Galileo, Newton, Einstein 
..., to advance Man towards the scientific control of his world. 
5 / The end of the Cold War did not eliminate the tensions and compe-
tition. At most, it slid the competition from global to regional levels. In fact, 
regions, as  soon  as  they  have  launched their  construction, add to  this  con-
struction an educational component, often before a cultural or identity com-
ponent. Thus, the construction of Europe by the European Community did 
adopt the Bologna Cooperation as soon as 1976, in order to "unify" the Eu-
ropean  higher  education  systems.  Thus,  the  construction  of  Asia  by  the 
Shanghai Cooperation Organization did adopt as soon as 2004 the system of 
a regional University and established student mobility, which seems to echo 
the Bologna process. 
                                                
7
. See P. Chabal, « International integration of higher education systems : the 
end  of  structural  differenciation  ? »,  international  conference,  Finance  Academy  of 
the  Russian  Federation  "The  Process  of  International  Integration  in  the  sphere  of 
higher education", in Review of the Finance Academy, vol 1-2, 2006.
 

 
32
6 / In both cases, what is at stake it is to organize the continuation of the 
bipolar tension of the Cold War by a bi-educational and "bi-mobile" tension 
that allows each "camp" to ensure the presence of the best students in its uni-
versities. While mobility also creates mutual understanding between students 
from  different  countries  in  the  region,  this  inter-human,  cultural  and  psy-
chosocial aspect is only indirect. What is wanted from the beginning, is a way 
to keep students in a region, making the idea of mobility in this region an at-
tractive one in their eyes, so that they do not go "look elsewhere" and do not 
go to socialize with the values … of another regional world. 
B)  the  linguistic,  cultural  and  ideological  dimension  of  educational 
“alignment” 
1 / On the occasion of this regionalization-internationalization of edu-
cation  systems,  another  kind  of  "great  discovery"  was  made.  Simply,  the 
discovery  that  education  has  a  strong  cultural  dimension.  Indeed,  as  lan-
guages cannot be studied outside a cultural context, or even a regional con-
text,
 8
 so the studies that young people follow are taking place in a context 
that marks the student beyond the content of programs. There is no axiolog-
ical neutrality in education policies in general and especially not in higher 
education and research polices in particular. 
2 / Therefore, if the world is moving towards educational systems less 
numerous and more and more "requiring" in their suggestion to homogenize 
the  world  into  two  or  three  competing  systems,  this  strongly  resembles  a 
new  cold  war.  It  seems  that  there  is  no  difference  in  kind  between  the 
alignments  of  the  Cold  War  into  two  blocks  and the  creation  of  two  large 
models - Western and Asian - of universities. To be more precise, the curri-
cula include, even in the exact sciences, a dimension marked by the project 
of civilization of the countries that teach these curricula. 
3 / In fact, during the Cold War, there occurred a kind of partial trian-
gulation in  order  to  "escape"  the  binary  shackles  of  two  major  camps, the 
West and the East. It is the desire not to be "aligned" (on the "Greats") from 
the 1950s (Bandung) and the 1960s (Non-Aligned Movement). Today, mu-
tatis mutandis, the educational dimension of the bipolarization of the world 
(the Soviet-American university rivalry until 1991 and the Sino-US univer-
sity rivalry since 1991), is found in the willingness of Europeans to be "nei-
ther in the West nor in the East" but able to retain or impose on others their 
higher education model. 
                                                
8
.  See  Jean-Marc  Delagneau,  “L’influence  culturelle  des  langues  dans  la 
dynamique    régionale »,  in  P.  Chabal  (dir.)  Concurrences  Interrégionales  Europe-
Asie au 21
ème
 siècle, Paris, L’Harmattan, 2014.
 

 
33
4  /  The  awareness  that  this  influence  (rayonnement)  can  also  be  ob-
tained  through  education  begins  early,  as  was  noticed  supra. The  Bologna 
process is launched as soon as 1976, that is to say  years before the Single 
market,  the  Common  currency  in  a  Europe  with  still  only  Nine  members, 
before the enlargement to southern Europe (Greece in 1981, Spain and Por-
tugal in 1986). In the case of Asia, the Shanghai University was launched as 
soon  as  2004,  that  is  to  say,  just  three  years after the  creation  of  the  SCO 
and the same year as the admission of the first observer, Mongolia. All SCO 
members are not partners of the University of Shanghai but already five of 
the six member countries are participating. 
5 / The most advanced form, which regional international cooperation 
in  education takes,  is the  form  of  joint  degrees.  A  large number  of  shades 
exist  between  ‘double’  degrees,  ‘joint’  degrees  and  joint  ‘programs’  with 
transfer  of  grades.  In  Europe,  a  system  was  even  created  for  this  purpose: 
the  ECTS  (European  Credit  Transfer  System).  But  whatever  the  nuances 
and subtleties, the basic idea is to create the opportunity to study at several 
universities in a region, while accumulating grades and "credits" and getting 
a degree with added value compared to a national diploma. 
6 / There is, in this, a new form of culture, proactive and ideational. Is 
it an ideology ? A kind of educational and regional ideology ? In part, yes, 
of  course.  Moreover,  we  note  that  there  are  few  systems  of  interregional 
student  mobility.  Mobility  is  seen  as  taking  place  within  the  same  region. 
Some  exceptions  exist:  some  universities  have  created  a  consortium  of 
Asian,  European,  the  Pacific  and  North  American  universities,  between 
which  students  "move"  from  semester  to  semester  and  get,  after  the  same 
number of years as for a national diploma, a diploma with a "plural label." 
But this remains the exception. There is essentially a regional dimen-
sion in the internationalization of higher education. However, I would sug-
gest that the regions can not be built at the expense of nations and that there 
is a need to ensure keeping national educational characteristics in a regional 
concert, which is possible. 
II - The necessary resistance to the loss of national characteristics of teaching 
Realism also requires to take into consideration the national dimension of 
education systems. One day perhaps, the nations will be  overtaken by another 
form of construction. In the past, the European provinces were merged into the 
Nation-States,  which  subsumed  them.  However,  for  the  present,  the  Nations 
form  the  basic  framework  of  decisions,  even  international  decisions,  and  the 
sovereignty  of States is the reference that imposes itself  since the 17
th
 century 
and the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648. Thus, we must preserve the asset of di-
versity, notably academic traditions (1) and maintain universities and national 
specificities to avoid a de-motivating “dilution” (2). 

 
34
A) the richness of the plurality of intellectual and epistemological traditions 
1  /  During the  slow  emergence  of  their  diversity,  societies  have  pro-
duced  various  cultures.  Among  the  elements  that  constitute  a  culture,  the 
ways  of  thinking  and  the  modes  of  analysis  differ.  This  begins  with  the 
modes  of communication using language, syntax and grammar, sometimes 
so  different  that  learning  these  languages  is  difficult  for  speakers  of  other 
languages. Thus, gradually, societies have come to differ markedly in their 
way of exchanging ideas and arguments 
2 / This has a direct bearing on the issues of education and research. It 
seems  that  "we  do  not  think  the  same  way  in  all  languages."  Researchers 
need  as  much  differences  in  education  systems  as  differences  in  ways  of 
expressing assumptions, demonstrations and conclusions. Some languages 
are prone to putting grammatical subjects before verbs, others use verbs that 
appear at the end of sentences, and others are agglutinative, etc. In the same 
manner,  some  scientific  traditions  are  deductive  or  inductive,  empirical  or 
hypothetical. 
3 / We come thus to questions of epistemology. Science needs differ-
ent intellectual  traditions.  Sometimes  this  complicates  the  analysis  but,  al-
ways, it enriches it.
9
 Any change towards the homogenization of education 
systems, in the sense of assimilating them into a single model, is a risk: the 
risk  to  loose  intellectual richness  and  scientific  power.  To  suggest  that  all 
students be trained in the same university model comes close to suggesting 
that they be educated in a single university and by the same teachers. 
4  /  Such a  development  would not  only  cause  a radical loss  of  com-
parative advantage, but, moreover, it would nullify or almost nullify all ef-
fectiveness of a system  of higher education and research. Can we imagine 
for a minute that the military of all countries could  be trained to the same 
geostrategic  principles,  using  the  same  weapons  and  defending  the  same 
ideals ? Certainly not ! The same goes for education. Intellectual traditions 
have always differed from each other. Historically, students - and teachers! 
- travelled to train differently elsewhere ! 
5  /  So  it  was  in the  Europe  of  the  Middle  Ages  when  the  trips  were 
common across the continent, from one university to another, from Bologna 
to Oxford, from Heidelberg to Salamanca, etc. So it was in the great Orien-
                                                
9
. See P. Chabal, On some epistemological problems in West European studies 
of  'the  wider  East  Asia'  in  the  post  cold  warin  Taiwan,  Poland  and  Europe  in  the 
Age of Globalisation (Malinowski et Burdelski dirs.), Varsovie, Ed. Adam Marsza-
lek,  pages  37-85,  2006,  presented  at  the  Polish  Association  of  Political  Science, 
Gdansk, novembre 2004 ; as well at the Research Committe 42, Seoul, octobre 2010.
 

 
35
tal world where students and teachers travelled the Middle East and Central 
Asia, from Bagdad to Samarkand, and from Tehran to Chingeti, in search of 
diverse  and  complementary  knowledge.  It  is  the  same  today:  a  student 
learns better by exposing himself to teachers who "think differently" than to 
"modern" teachers who "think the same." 
6 / If teachers are able to provide different, complementary and enriching 
teachings, that is to say teachings that are complementary because they differ, it 
is simply because they themselves were educated, trained, tested and instructed 
differently. The differences are thus not just intellectual or related to knowledge, 
they  are  also  methodological,  epistemological  and  cultural  variations.  One 
knows this very well. In some countries, the number of lectures is reduced and 
students are encouraged to conduct extensive research by themselves (the "es-
say"  system  in  the  Anglo-American  world).  In  other  countries,  students  are 
trained  by  lectures  and  exams  in  lecture  form  of  masterful  "essays"  (in  Latin 
countries). However, in both cases, countries produce science, Nobel prizes and 
useful knowledge to mankind in the long-term. 
B)  keeping  national  dimensions  to  avoid  being  “sucked-up”  and      
de-structured 
1 / Educational issues are thus but one aspect among others of interna-
tional relations. To suggest to keep a character in part national for education 
systems - except of course the language question - is not the same as saying 
that we must "stiffen" international exchanges, or make them “hostile”. It is 
simply  to  say  that  there  is  more  to  lose  than  gain  in  homogenizing  too 
much.  Differences  enrich,  we  said  it above,  because  they  create  emulation 
and  a  stimulating  competition  among  players,  which  is  possible  by  Peace: 
Olympic games have indeed, in this sense, replaced wars. 
2 / For nations, to become "too similar" would be destructuring. Nations 
especially  have  as  their  role  to  be  able  to  establish  dialogues  between  them-
selves to avoid war. Similarly, at their level, regions have a vocation to develop 
and improve their capacity for dialogue.
10
 Therefore, what matters is that they 
be able to  exchange among themselves, including students, but also to  “retain 
their souls”. Nations are in this sense Homelands (“patries”). And Homelands 
do not dissolve into any higher “whole”. Once equipped  with an identity, Na-
tions and Homelands are intent (and intended) to remain themselves. 
                                                
10
.  See  P.  Chabal  Le  dialogue  Europe-Asie  et  la  stabilisation  de  l’Asie  de 
l’est :  vers  une  nouvelle  géographie  de  l’influence ?,  in  Régions,  Institutions, 
Politiques  :  perspectives  euro-asiatiques  institutionnelles  et  fonctionnelles",  P. 
Chabal  (dir.)  Apopsix,  2010,  pp.  158-190 ;  et  P.  Chabal  Le  dialogue  géopolitique 
régional  entre  l'Europe  et  la  Turquie,  in  P.  Chabal  et  A.  de  Raulin  (dirs.),  Les 
Chemins de la Turquie vers l'Europe, Artois Presses Université, 2002, pp. 85-118
 

 
36
3  /  If  all  Nations  allowed  themselves  to  be  "sucked-up"  by  a  single 
model, which would “empty them” of their own substance, the world would 
look  like  a  stereotypical  repetition.  It  would  be  a  "Brave  New  World"  as 
portrayed in Huxley's novel of the same title. What has changed dramatical-
ly in recent decades and, more so, since the Cold War, in particular, is that 
the race for excellence, intellectual competition is a race for life, a race for 
knowledge and for construction. It is no longer a death race, an arms race 
and a race to destruction. They called it, in terms of theories of international 
relations, "mutual assured destruction" (MAD). 
4 / Today, there can exist, on the contrary, an "Avant-gardist mutual and or-
ganisational construction” (AMOC), where everyone would remain different but 
where all would work together to advance science. Such a formulation sounds like 
a Utopia or naivety or even like a contradiction. Indeed, at the beginning of this 
article, I said that international relations remained equally competitive and that this 
competition had become educational, intellectual and academic. 
5 / I accept this apparent contradiction. I am not saying that issues of 
academic competition are easier to solve than diplomatic, military or politi-
cal ones. I am saying that they are different. Thus, two professors may dis-
agree and this disagreement may lead to intense clashes. Yet, through these 
clashes,  they  both  seek  not  to  be  right  at  the  expense  of  the  other  but  to 
make knowledge and expertise progress together in their field of research. 
6 / In education, as in culture, values  and traditions, humans need land-
marks. These markers are provided to them by sharing with their peers in ways 
that are common to them. This does not mean to isolate oneself. Two research-
ers from the same country and the same university system may equally need to 
confront their colleagues from other systems as they need to be together in order 
to  formalize  their  research  findings.  After  more  than  twenty  years  of  interna-
tional academic experience, the author of this article does not intend to cut him-
self  from his national academic traditions but he does not intend either, in the 
least, to deprive himself from the enriching contact that he receives from inte-
racting with his colleagues around the world. 
 
*** 
In conclusion, the question of whether countries should now merge their 
higher education systems together is quite simple. It is answered in the negative. 
If  we  must  remain  attentive  to  international  developments,  we  should  build 
national education systems and keep  on improving them, and not dilute them 
from the start into an international or intercontinental or transnational illusion, 
which is a kind of mirage. Mirages are the prerogative of deserts. 
 We should not turn the world into an intellectual desert, with the pre-
text  to  endow  the  world  with  similar  universities,  identical  programs  and 
reproduced knowledge. 

 
37

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   20


©emirsaba.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал