Сборник состоит из четырех разделов: Государственный язык



жүктеу 5.04 Kb.

бет25/29
Дата22.12.2016
өлшемі5.04 Kb.
1   ...   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29

ФОРМИРОВАНИЕ ЛИНГВИСТИЧЕСКИХ 
СПОСОБНОСТЕЙ У УЧАЩИХСЯ 
НА УРОКАХ АНГЛИЙСКОГО ЯЗЫКА

256
вание языковых знаний у каждого ученика и видеть результат данной 
деятельности, что имеет большое значение для современного человека. 
СПИСОК ЛИТЕРАТУРЫ:
1. Герасимова Т. Роль нетрадиционных уроков в формировании коммуни-
кативных навыков в процессе изучения иностранного языка. [Электрон-
ный ресурс] // [2011 г.]. – URL: http://www.bestreferat.ru/referat-137351.
html (дата обращения 30.10.2013)
2.  Немов  Р.С.  Основы  психологического  консультирования:  Учеб.  для 
студ. Педвузов / Р.С. Немов. – М.: Гуманит. изд. центр ВЛАДОС, 2000 
г. – 394 с.
3. Немов Р.С. Психология. Учебник для студентов высш. пед. учеб. за-
ведений. В 3-х кн-х. – 4-е изд. Кн. 1: Общие основы психологии / Р.С. 
Немов. – М.: Гуманит. изд. центр ВЛАДОС, 2003 г. – 688 с.
4. Немов Р.С. Общие основы психологии. В 3-х кн-х. – 4-е изд. Кн. 3. – 
М.: Гуманит. изд. центр. ВЛАДОС, 2003 г. – С. 293-301, 308-309. 
5. Рогов Е.И. Настольная книга практического психолога: В 2 кн. Кн. 1. 
/ Е.И. Рогов. – М.: Изд-во ВЛАДОС, 2001 г. – 384 c.
6.  Рубинштейн  С.Л.  Основы  общей  психологии  /  С.Л.  Рубинштейн.  – 
СПб.: Издательство Союз, 2000 г. – 355 с.
7. Тарасюк Н.А. Иностранный язык для школьников: уроки общения (на 
примере английского языка). – М., 2000 г.
8.  Леонтьев  А.А.  Психологические  предпосылки  раннего  овладения 
иностранными языками // Иностранные языки в школе, 1985 г. – № 5. – 
С. 24-30.
Жунусова А.К., Назарбаев Интеллектуальная Школа химико-
биологического направления г. Усть-Каменогорск
TEACHERS’ PERCEPTIONS OF THE IMPACT OF 
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ON TEACHING PRACTICE: 
INTELLECTUAL SECONDARY SCHOOL IN KAZAKHSTAN
Context
Continuing professional development (CPD) is becoming a priority in 
education systems of most countries worldwide. The demand for enhanced 
Раздел 3. 
Вопросы реализации компетентностного подхода 
в преподавании иностранных языков

257
quality of teaching and learning along with growing accountability and higher 
academic  standards  has  led  to  issues  related  to  the  effective  professional 
development  on  the  agenda  of  educators,  researchers  and  policy-makers 
(Creemers, Kyriakides, Antoniou, 2013). Now CPD is viewed as the most 
effi cient approach to provide teachers with adequate training, and improve 
their  instructional  and  intervention  practices  (Fraser,  Kennedy,  Reid, 
Mckinney, 2007). Generally speaking, the teachers’ CPD is one of the major 
factors in ensuring the effectiveness of education reforms at all level.
The research takes place in Intellectual Secondary School. This school 
has the capacity of 720 seats. At present there are 668 students and 485 of 
them are the holders of educational grant given by the First President of the 
Republic  of  Kazakhstan.  The  quality  innovative  educational  model,  that 
meets the needs of the modern Kazakh society is realized by 118 Kazakhstani 
teachers. They are 13 teacher-experts, 40 teacher-moderators, 35 teachers and 
30 probationers. Moreover, 14 of them are involved in the development of 
educational programs and 9 work in the development of textbooks. 24 foreign 
teachers from such countries as the USA, Canada, New Zealand, and the UK 
are invited to team-teach with local teachers. Educators in this school always 
improve  their  skills  by  attending  professional  development  courses.  Both 
experienced and newly qualifi ed teachers have an equal chance to get trained 
within the country as well as abroad and to improve basic skill and acquire 
new.  However  it  is  still  questionable  which  provisions  are  successful  in 
delivering high quality training. The main purpose of this study is to examine 
teachers’  perceptions  of  the  professional  development  and  its  infl uence  on 
teaching practice. The following research questions will guide this research:
1. What CPD courses have teachers had?
2. What other CPD provisions are available?
3. What are the forms of delivery?
4. How effective was delivery?
5.  To  what  extent  and  how  CPD  had  affected  teachers  teaching 
practice?
1. Literature review
1.1. Continuing professional development
There is a plethora of interpretations of the concept of CPD and usually 
authors use various terms when making a reference to this concept. According 
to Day and Sachs (2004) CPD can refer to ‘all the activities in which teachers 
engage  during  the  course  of  a  career  which  are  designed  to  enhance  their 
work’.  Literature  revealed  that  CPD  is  often  associated  with  terms  such 
Жунусова А.К.
TEACHERS’ PERCEPTIONS OF THE IMPACT OF 
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ON TEACHING 
PRACTICE: INTELLECTUAL SECONDARY 
SCHOOL IN KAZAKHSTAN

258
as  human  resource  development,  staff  development,  career  development, 
lifelong  learning  and  continuing  education.  As  claimed  by  Taylor  (1975) 
staff development and further professional study are the main components 
of  teacher  professional  development  (cited  in  Bell  and  Day,  1991).  He 
highlighted  that  staff  development  emerges  from  the  needs  of  institution, 
whereas  further  professional  study  originate  from  individual  needs  (Bell 
and Day, 1991). However, Watson (1976) argues, professional development 
ensures personal and professional development of the school staff, in so doing 
improves performance of both teachers and schools (cited in Bella and Day, 
1991). Day (1999) later agrees that all natural learning experiences, which 
constitute professional development, are intended to benefi t the individual, 
group or school. These experiences can be weather conscious or unconscious, 
direct  or  indirect.  Moreover,  professional  development  contributes  to  the 
quality of teaching in the classroom (Day, 1999).
Some  authors  consider  professional  development  as  a  systematic 
process. For instance Guskey (2000) claims, ‘true professional development 
is  a  systematic  process  that  considers  change  over  an  extended  period  of 
time and takes into account all levels of the organization. Glatthorn (1995) 
supports this view and defi nes it as the systematic examination and analyzing 
of  teaching  and  the  professional  growth  of  a  teacher  achieved  as  a  result 
of gaining increased experience. Consequently, the absence of a systematic 
approach can hinder or prevent the success of improvement efforts.
1.2. Models of CPD 
From  the  previous  part  it  is  clear  that  continuous  professional 
development has a wide range of defi nitions. However, it has many models 
of  delivery  as  well.  These  models  provide  teachers  with  a  wide  range  of 
opportunities and options to improve their professional knowledge and skills. 
Literature review revealed that there exist two models of professional 
development: traditional and alternative. However, because of the changes 
in teacher’s role and responsibilities, traditional model which takes form of 
formal courses and one-shot seminars is being widely criticized by researchers. 
This  mode  of  delivery  is  described  as  shallow  and  short  to  have  positive 
impact on teaching and learning, in addition it is lack of in-depth learning 
(Liberman,  1995;  Darling-Hammond,  1997;  Ferguson,  2006).  Killion  and 
Harrison  (2006)  highlight,  ‘traditional  professional  development  usually 
occurs  away  from  the  schools  site,  separate  from  classroom  contexts  and 
challenges in which teachers are expected to apply what they have learned, 
and often without the necessary support to facilitate transfer of learning.’
Раздел 3. 
Вопросы реализации компетентностного подхода 
в преподавании иностранных языков

259
Alternative model, in comparison to traditional one, is collaborative 
and learner-centred in nature. The main focus of this model is to create an 
environment  where  teachers  can  experiment  new  ideas,  be  refl ective,  and 
build  up  knowledge  about  teaching  and  learning  in  the  authentic  context 
(Borko and Putnam, 1998).
There are various forms of professional development delivery, which 
exist  within  the  traditional  and  alternative  models.  Guskey  (2000)  states 
that  the  main  professional  development  models  are  described  by  Sparks 
and  Loucks-Horsley  (1989)  and  Drago-Severson  (1994).  Professional 
development can be organized in the following forms: training, mentoring, 
study  groups,  action  research,  observation/assessment,  individually  guided 
activities, and involvement in a development.
1.3. The impact on teaching practice
The main focus of this study is to examine teachers’ perceptions of the 
impact on their teaching practice made by the various types of professional 
development. There is a number of research works (Bredeson, 2000; Boyle 
et  al,  2004;  Desimone,  2009;  Bolam,  2002;  Hargreaves  and  Evans,  1997), 
which support the idea that taking part in professional development brings 
about changes in teaching practice. 
As indicated by an inquiry of teachers’ participation in professional 
development, activities within such programmes equipped teachers with up-
to-date information, changed their perception of teaching and their teaching 
practice, and encouraged them to search for additional information (Bredeson, 
2000). Boyle et. al. (2004) agree that professional development can lead to 
changes in teaching style, improve teacher collaboration, planning, classroom 
management, and assessment practices. Professional development infl uences 
the teachers’ decision-making ability and leadership behaviour (Desimone, 
2009) so that to bring valuable changes in teaching and educate students more 
effectively (Bolam, 2002; Hargreaves and Evans, 1997). Teachers feel that in 
the long-run professional development experiences have supported them in 
building confi dence with their practice (Buczynski and Hansen, 2010; Powell 
et.  al.,  2003).  Besides,  Harris  et.  al.  (2011)  identifi ed  that  the  majority  of 
teachers  accepted  that  professional  development  has  positively  infl uenced 
their confi dence in teaching. 
Research  studies  refl ect  that  some  features  of  CPD  are  critical  to 
enriching  teacher  knowledge  and  skills,  and  enhancing  their  teaching.  For 
instance, individually oriented CPD revealed few cases when practices and 
beliefs  of  a  teacher  changed  as  a  result  of  participating  in  CPD.  (General 
Жунусова А.К.
TEACHERS’ PERCEPTIONS OF THE IMPACT OF 
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ON TEACHING 
PRACTICE: INTELLECTUAL SECONDARY 
SCHOOL IN KAZAKHSTAN

260
Teaching  Council  for  England,  2005.)  Timperley  (2008)  claims  ‘it  is 
unfortunately  possible  for  professional  development  to  have  an  adverse 
impact on teacher practice and student outcomes’. Timperley (2008) further 
explains that not every expert, offering professional development activities, 
has  the  knowledge  and  skills  to  do  such  things.  To  provide  effective 
professional development experts should be familiar with the content of the 
relevant curricula and what teaching practices make a difference for students 
(ibid).
1.4. Effective professional development
A  review  of  literature  showed  that  there  is  a  number  of  research 
studies  (Desimone,  2009;  Hawley  and  Valli,  1999;  Timperley,  2008)  that 
focus mainly on the evaluation of features of professional development that 
are  effective  in  relation  to  teaching  practice.  Findings  from  these  research 
works have revealed that professional development is more effective when 
‘the teacher has an active role in constructing knowledge (teacher as action 
researcher), collaborates with colleagues (collective critical refl ection), the 
content relates to, and is situated in, the daily teaching practice (emphasis on 
teaching skills), the content is differentiated to meet individual developmental 
needs  and  the  possibilities  and  limitations  of  the  workplace  are  taken  into 
account.’ (Creemers et. al., 2013)
Guskey (2000) believes, getting regular feedbacks is able to change 
teaching practice unlike professional development conducted in the forms of 
large group presentations, trainings, workshops and seminars. He mentions 
that effective professional development for teachers needs to provide them 
with such opportunity (Guskey, 2000). While Hargreaves (1999) states that 
collaboration raises effi ciency since it ‘eliminates duplication and removes 
redundancy between teachers and subjects as activities are co-ordinated and 
responsibilities are shared in complementary ways’ (Hargreaves, 1999). 
A strong emphasis on knowledge content is crucial to the effectiveness 
of  any  professional  development,  argues  Borko  (2004).  It  is  believed  that 
participation  in  professional  development  presents  the  opportunities  for 
teachers  to  renovate  their  knowledge  base  along  with  introducing  new 
knowledge  and  skills  (Borko,  2004).  Consequently,  it  can  be  said  that 
knowledge  content  is  the  most  important  feature  of  any  form  of  teachers’ 
professional development.
Summarizing,  CPD  is  a  broad  and  extensive  concept  and  there  is 
no  unique  defi nition.  However,  there  are  some  key  defi nitions  that  are 
close in the meaning and show the nature of CPD. CPD is considered as an 
Раздел 3. 
Вопросы реализации компетентностного подхода 
в преподавании иностранных языков

261
intentional, ongoing and systematic process of training and learning, which 
can  take  place  either  in  external  or  work-based  settings.  Mainly,  CPD  is 
designed to contribute to the advancing the quality of learning and teaching 
and consequently, to improve education system. It is also evident from this 
chapter  that  CPD  has  two  models  and  can  take  various  forms  of  delivery. 
Applying  alternative  while  organizing  CPD  is  more  prevalent  as  it  has 
collaborative nature and centered on the learner. It became apparent that CPD 
has a direct infl uence on teaching and student achievement. In addition, the 
effectiveness of CPD can be measured taking into consideration the changes 
that are brought into classroom and results of students. The emerged themes 
while reviewing literature will shape the design of this research work.
2. Research Methodology
2.1. Approach
The  research  takes  place  in  the  Intellectual  Secondary  School  in 
Kazakhstan. Consequently, a case study approach was chosen to investigate 
the problem of the study in greater depth. According to Creswell (2010), a 
case study approach allows for gaining insights of a particular situation/case 
and  understanding  its  dynamics.  Moreover,  this  approach  is  an  empirical 
research type that explores a phenomenon within its real-life context. A case 
study provides a unique example of real people in a real situation (Cohen and 
Manion, 2007). The choice of case study for this enquiry is determined by its 
appropriateness of investigating teachers’ perception of the CPD provided by 
school and its impact on their teaching practice. Some researchers critisise a 
case study approach for its lack of breadth (Ary et al., 2006) and rigor (Yin, 
2009). Thus, as claimed by Yin (2009), it provides little basis for scientifi c 
generalisation.  However,  in  spite  of  these  criticisms,  this  approach  is  still 
the most appropriate to this research work since it gives an opportunity for 
detailed exploration and interrogation of an instance in action (Bush, 2002; 
Stark, Torrance, 2005).
2.2. Method
Lankshear  and  Knobel  (2004)  highlight  that  the  research  questions 
and the case being researched could be described in-detail and in-depth by 
means  of  qualitative  research  method.  Qualitative  research  approach  has 
a number of advantages for an enquiry such as this. This research method 
examines  systems  or  people  through  interacting  with  and  observing  them 
in  their  natural  setting  (Creswell  et.  al.  2010).  McMillan  and  Schumacher 
(2001) refl ect that qualitative research assists the researcher in understanding 
human behaviour and experience, particularly in more complex systems of 
Жунусова А.К.
TEACHERS’ PERCEPTIONS OF THE IMPACT OF 
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ON TEACHING 
PRACTICE: INTELLECTUAL SECONDARY 
SCHOOL IN KAZAKHSTAN

262
integrated life processes. This research required qualitative method because 
the researcher have tried to understand specifi cally teachers’ perceptions of 
an infl uence of CPD, they are engaged in, on their teaching practice.
2.3. Instruments
I opted for an interview as the main tool of collecting data Regarding 
Kvale  (1996),  interview  is  a  specifi c  form  of  conversation  that  usually 
involves  a  researcher  asking  questions  and  interviewee  answering  them 
(Robson,  2002).  Wellington  (2000)  agrees  that  research  interviews  are 
utilised to examine participants’ views, perspectives or experiences. 
There  are  various  advantages  of  the  research  interview  over  other 
research instruments. ‘Interviews provide the opportunity to cover a broader 
range of issues’ and ‘ the researcher is able to explain the meaning of any terms 
the participant may not understand’ (Hobson and Townsend, 2010 cited in 
Hartas, 2010). In addition, Oppenheim (1992) claims that interviews have high 
rates of responses and respondents become more motivated (cited in Cohen 
et. al., 2000). Interviewing, however, has limitations as well. This methodcan 
be time-consuming, including organising visits, arranging appropriate time 
and venue, transcribing the answers, etc. Thus, the sample size may relatively 
reduce  and  it  becomes  much  harder  to  claim  the  generalizability  (Hobson 
and  Townsend,  2010  cited  in  Hartas,  2010).  This  research  applies  semi-
structured interviews with open-ended questions. Semi-structured interviews 
ensure  the  coverage  of  researcher’s  agenda  and  allow  interviewees  to  talk 
about important things to them (Hobson and Townsend, 2010 cited in Hartas, 
2010). In so doing, the researcher may achieve ‘ both breadth and depth in 
their data sets’ (ibid).  
2.4. Sampling
This  research  was  conducted  in  the  Intellectual  Secondary  School 
in  Kazakhstan.  Due  to  the  research  being  small-scale  the  researcher  could 
not involve as many participants as possible. Initially, questionnaires were 
distributed  to  20  teachers  who  hold  a  leading  and  teaching  position  in  the 
school; both experienced and newly qualifi ed teachers. However, owing to 
the mentioned above reason the process of questioning is not presented in 
this work, but it is in the scope of this research. Teachers for up-following 
interviews  were  selected  based  on  the  questionnaires.  Among  teachers 
who  had  showed  their  willingness  to  be  interviewed,  the  researcher  chose 
1  participant  from  the  leadership  team,  who  is  actually  in  charge  of  CPD 
in  school. The  rest  of  participants  constituted  2  experienced  teachers  with 
experience no less than 15 years and newly qualifi ed teachers with experience 
Раздел 3. 
Вопросы реализации компетентностного подхода 
в преподавании иностранных языков

263
no more than 2 years. 
The main reason for using this way of selection is to generate a broad 
range of perceptions and experiences of teachers about CPD and its infl uence 
on teaching practice. In this study, the researcher utilized purposive sampling 
to identify particular groups of teachers. Creswell et. al. (2010) mention that 
purposive sampling is the sampling approach where participants are selected 
based on the data they hold and to satisfy specifi c needs of the researcher 
(Cohen et. al., 2000). Creswell et. al. (2010) further explain, the purposive 
sampling holds the purpose of gaining the richest source of information to 
address the research questions.
2.5. Data collection process
The  process  of  data  collection  involved  mainly  semi-structured 
interviews.  Prior  to  actual  interviews  the  researcher  emailed  the  interview 
schedule  so  that  participants  could  refl ect  on  their  own  CPD.  In  addition, 
interviewees  were  sent  copies  of  the  signed  consent.  Bearing  in  mind  that 
the  tested  school  is  located  in  Kazakhstan  and  due  to  some  circumstances 
the  researcher  could  not  travel  there  to  conduct  face-to-face  interviews. 
Consequently, it was decided to hold interviews through Skype program. The 
researcher arranged the appointments with interviewees, previously informing 
them about the time by email. In case time was suitable, participants chose 
a  room  with  necessary  equipment  (computer,  web  camera,  microphone, 
software) where the interview took place. Interviews continued from half an 
hour to one hour and were recorded with participants’ permission. Recorded 
interviews then were transcribed and sent back to interviewees for respondent 
validation.
2.6. Authenticity 
It  is  crucial  for  the  researcher  to  ensure  the  research  fi ndings  are 
authentic.  Bush  (2007)  claims  ‘the  authenticity  of  educational  and  social 
research can be judged by the procedures used to address validity, reliability’ 
(cited in Briggs and Coleman, 2007). The researcher acknowledged biases by 
taking account of validity, reliability, and ethicality of the research methods 
applied. Silverman (2000) asserts that reliability is ‘the degree of consistency 
with which instances are assigned to the same category by different observers 
or by the same observer on different occasions’. Whereas, ‘validity tells us 
whether  an  item  measures  or  describes  what  it  is  supposed  to  measure  or 
describe. If an item is unreliable, then it must also lack validity, but reliable 
item is not necessarily valid.’ (Bell, 1999). Cohen et al. (2007) claim that the 
term reliability is not appropriate as it is common for the fi eld of quantitative 
Жунусова А.К.

1   ...   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29


©emirsaba.org 2017
әкімшілігінің қараңыз

войти | регистрация
    Басты бет


загрузить материал